Faculty News

PROFESSOR BLAIR AWARDED NEW FRONTIERS IN THE ARTS & HUMANITIES GRANT

Professor Heather Blair was awarded a 2015 New Frontiers in the Arts & Humanities grant of $38,177 for her project, The Gods Make You Giggle: Finding Religion in Japanese Children's Picture Books.

PROFESSORS HEATHER BLAIR AND DAVID HABERMAN AWARDED RESEARCH GRANTS BY THE CONSORTIUM FOR THE STUDY OF RELIGION, ETHICS, AND SOCIETY

Heather Blair
Heather Blair
David Haberman
David Haberman

The Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society has awarded $51,248 to 11 faculty from three IU campuses to further their research on the topic of “Wonder and the Natural World.” This grant funding is the first phase of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by the consortium on the theme of “Wonder and the Natural World.” The first phase will culminate in a daylong public symposium on May 22, 2015, at which funding recipients, along with invited guests, will present their works-in-progress.

“We received a truly impressive array of proposals, linking wonder to many facets of human and nonhuman life,” said IU Bloomington religious studies professor and consortium director Lisa Sideris. “The successful proposals reflect on the light and dark dimensions of wonder, as well as wonder’s ethical, emotional, cognitive, pedagogical, aesthetic and religious forms. It will be exciting to see the conversations that emerge from these diverse studies of wonder.”

The goal of the funding is to encourage faculty to engage with the idea of “wonder” in all its forms and in a variety of disciplines. The awardees cut across academic fields, from faculty in religious studies and English to bioethics and anthropology.

Heather Blair, assistant professor in the Department of Religious Studies at IU Bloomington, was awarded funding for her project "Super-Natural: Configuring Childhood Virtue in Contemporary Japanese Picture Books." “This project examines representations of the natural world in post-war Japanese children’s literature,” she said, “with a particular emphasis on contemporary picture books designed for children ages 3 to 6. Broadly speaking, it aims to introduce the study of Japanese children’s literature into ongoing conversations about childhood, character education, religion, and ethics.”

The symposium, May 22, 2015, will provide a space for grantees to present their in-progress work to colleagues and the public. It will be followed in 2016 by an international conference to explore more deeply discussions of wonder and nature begun at the symposium.

LISA SIDERIS AWARDED THE BETH WOOD DISTINGUISHED SERVICE-LEARNING FACULTY AWARD

Lisa Sideris
Lisa Sideris

Associate Professor Lisa Sideris was awarded the 2014-2014 Beth Wood Distinguished Service-Learning Faculty Award. This award honors faculty who have demonstrated excellence in three areas: 1) teaching pedagogically strong and mutually beneficial service-learning classes, 2) participating in Service-Learning Program events (for example, as attendees at coffee hours or presenters at our more formal events) and 3) raising visibility of service-learning on and off campus. This award is named after Beth Wood who taught service-learning public relations courses in the School of Journalism, until she lost her battle with cancer in November of 2009. Her teaching exemplified high quality service-learning valued by students and community partner agencies alike.

PROFESSOR ING AWARDED CHIANG CHING-KUO FOUNDATION GRANT

photo of Michael Ing
Michael Ing

Michael Ing, assistant professor of Religious Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington, was awarded a Junior Scholars Grant by The Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange. Ing will be awarded $30,000 to study “Vulnerabilities of the Self in early Confucianism”.

As part of The Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation grant Ing will look at the question of vulnerability in the context of early Confucianism. In particular he will examine the meaningful things people believed to be beyond their power to control, i.e. relationships, social position, health, and how they coped with the possibility, or even the inevitability, of loss. Ing’s project will challenge the dominant view of Confucian self-cultivation as invulnerable to misfortune and on a larger scale will broaden the field of Confucian thought by bringing neglected texts to bear on contemporary philosophical issues.

“I believe that Vulnerabilities of the Self will reveal a kind of value in vulnerability,” Ing explains. “Vulnerability, in this light, shows the risks associated with living a good life. It demonstrates that living a life without risk is a life not worth living. A vulnerable self is a permeable and precarious self, yet the self can only be cultivated by opening up to relationships with other people.”

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PROFESSOR BLAIR WINS 2014 TRUSTEES TEACHING AWARD

Photo of Heather Blair
Heather Blair

Professor Heather Blair was awarded the Trustees Teaching Award recognizing her excelence in teaching at Indiana University, especially at the undergraduate level. This peer nominated award is for tenured or tenure-track faculty, or full-time lecturers or clinical faculty whose primary duty is teaching, who have demonstrated that they are the best teachers. The IUB Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Affairs is responsible for establishing and supervising the procedures for determining the award recipients.

CONSTANCE FUREY AWARDED THE JAMES P. HOLLAND AWARD FOR EXEMPLARY TEACHING AND SERVICE TO STUDENTS

photo of Constance Furey
Constance Furey

April, 2014. Constance Furey was selected to receive the 2014 James P. Holland Award for Exemplary Teaching and Service to Students.

This award was established in memory of the late James P. Holland, a long time faculty member in Biology celebrated for his concern for and commitment to service to students, as well as his excellent teaching. Each spring, undergraduate students from the College nominate professors for this award. Professors Anne Pyburn and Eric Sandweiss, the 2012 and 2013 Holland Award recipients, respectively, joined Associate Dean John Louis Lucaites on the selection committee this year.

Several of Furey's students wrote letters of support, providing compelling descriptions of the outstanding contributions of teaching and service to students that she makes to the College of Arts and Sciences, as well as to the campus as a whole. This award rightly honors an exceptional and enthusiastic educator, whose concern for the personal well-being and intellectual development of her students inspires respect as well as deep admiration.

SIDERIS NAMED DIRECTOR OF CONSORTIUM FOR THE STUDY OF RELIGION, ETHICS AND SOCIETY (CSRES)

Lisa Sideris
Lisa Sideris

January, 2014. Lisa Sideris, Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies, has been tapped to direct a new consortium that builds on longstanding Indiana University strengths in fields related to religion, spirituality, and ethics. This consortium has been established as a partnership between IU Bloomington and Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis.

IU is launching the Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society (CSRES) to encourage research examining the interaction of religious ideas and practices with ethical, legal, and other social and cultural frameworks. The CSRES will sponsor a biannual internal grant competition paired with a national conference, both focused on a research theme such as religion and politics, religion and the environment, or the ethics of war and peace. IU faculty from various disciplines will be eligible to apply for the internal research grants, with the first biannual national conference planned for 2015-16. The conferences will involve scholars from IU and other institutions.

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HABERMAN RECEIVES GUGGENHEIM FELLOWSHIP

david haberman
David Haberman

April 16, 2013 - David Haberman is among the five Indiana University Bloomington professors in the College of Arts and Sciences who are recipients of the prestigious John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for 2013.

"This is an important and happy moment in the College," said Larry Singell, executive dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. "These fellowships will allow our accomplished scholars to pursue freely their research interests. This experience will advance their scholarship and benefit their colleagues and students. Thus, the impact of a Guggenheim is felt across multiple generations of scholars."

Haberman's research interests include South Asian religious traditions and, more recently, the intersection of religion and ecology. He's involved in this emerging field and serves on the advisory board of the Forum on Religion and Ecology based at the Yale University School for Forestry and Environmental Studies. He plans to use his fellowship to work on a book project focused on the worship of Mount Govardhan, one of the most distinguishing features of the sacred landscape of Braj, the region in northern India associated primary with Krishna.

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