Undergraduate Courses

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REL-R 133: INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION (29905)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Myers Hall 130
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

What is this thing that we call religion, and how should we study it? This course introduces students to the many different ways modern scholars of religion have tried to answer these questions. In examining religious studies from this perspective, students will learn that much of our current knowledge about religion is founded upon competing claims about the existence of God, the value of religion in shaping individual and collective psychology, the origins of religious practice and consciousness, and the role that religion plays in structuring culture and society.

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (29897)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: F 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 135
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (29896)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 135
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (29895)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: R 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (29894)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: MW 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Lindley Hall 102
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (29903)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: F 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (29904)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: F 5:45 PM — 6:35 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (29901)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: R 7:55 PM — 8:45 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (29902)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (29899)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: R 5:45 PM — 6:35 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (29900)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: R 6:50 PM — 7:40 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (29898)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: TR 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Jordan Hall A100
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 175: RELIGION AND SPORTS (32431)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Harriss, Mathew Cooper
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: MWF 12:20 PM — 1:10 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

On the appointed day supplicants file into the sacred chamber wearing the appropriate colors and symbols on their bodies and clothing. They chant in unison the words inherited from their ancestors, standing and sitting at crucial moments as they implore powers beyond themselves to intervene in human affairs, to vanquish the forces of evil, tilting the balance and bringing forth another Hoosier basketball victory over Purdue. This course considers the many ways that religion and sports are alike and argues that you can learn a great deal about one through careful attention to the other. We'll consider how fans treat sporting events like sacred rites, examine the civil religion of the Super Bowl, delve into sports as religion (as with surfing), the peril of religious athletes (Tim Tebow, Sandy Koufax, or Muhammad Ali, for instance), sacred space, holy violence, and shrines of sacred memory (as with halls of fame). By the end of the semester you should have a new and deeper appreciation of the fascinating and complicated ways religion works that comes from looking closer at seemingly familiar materials. At the same time, you'll never participate in or observe even a simple sporting event again in quite the same way.

REL-D 201: SHAMANS, MEDIUMS AND PROPHETS (29916)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Selka, Stephen
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Ballantine Hall 103
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course is concerned with spirits and their interactions with human beings in the material world. It focuses on the phenomena of spirit possession and exorcism in particular, approaching these not simply as oddities on the margins of what is properly religious, but as central to how religion and modernity are defined. During the semester we will looking at particular practices of possession and exorcism, the wider social and historical contexts of these phenomena, and how possession and exorcism fit into the academic study of religion in general. Specific topics we will cover include theories of spirit possession, theories of gender and embodiment, spiritualist practices in the nineteenth century United States, African-derived spirit possession practices in the Americas, rites of exorcism in Catholicism and evangelical Christianity, and the depiction of exorcism in film.

REL-A 210: INTR OLD TESTAMNT/HEBREW BIBLE (11511)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Mokhtarian, Jason Sion
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 310
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

The Hebrew Bible is a foundational text of Western civilization. The goal of this course is to familiarize you with this collection and to understand its development over time in an ancient culture that was radically different from our own. Besides the texts that make up the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, we will also consider non-biblical texts that were written and read in the same period, including writings from the Dead Sea Scrolls, placing them in a broader historical and cultural context of Jewish Antiquity. How were these writings created, interpreted, used, and collected by ancient communities in the formative period that gave birth to Judaism and Christianity? Throughout the course, we will discuss how the texts of the Hebrew Bible have been read and interpreted in very different ways by ancient religious communities and by modern biblical scholars. This approach is meant to encourage reflection on our own reading practices, and to understand how the assumptions we bring to a text, and the context in which we read it, affect the meanings that it comes to make.

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (29914)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: F 5:45 PM — 6:35 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (29913)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: F 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (31298)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: R 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-B 220: INTRODUCTION TO HINDUISM (29907)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Manring, Rebecca
Course Duration: 3/6/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: TR 8:00 AM — 10:30 AM
Location: Ballantine Hall 208
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (29910)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: R 6:50 PM — 7:40 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0006
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (29912)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (29909)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: R 5:45 PM — 6:35 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0006
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (29908)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: TR 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Chemistry 122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (29911)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: R 7:55 PM — 8:45 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0006
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-B 230: INTRO TO CHINESE RELIGION (30447)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Zhang, Meng
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 3/4/17
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM — 8:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 146
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 235: SACRED BOOKS OF THE JEWS (29917)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Mokhtarian, Jason Sion
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 244
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course will explore the sacred texts of Judaism after the Bible with a particular emphasis on cultivating the skills of close textual analysis. In this course, students explore questions such as: Why are some texts considered sacred, while others are not? How did Jews create new religious knowledge after the Bible was canonized? Did they imagine that revelation had stopped, and if so, how could a new sacred text come into being? In exploring these types of questions, this class exposes students to a wide variety of genres of Jewish sacred texts, including the Mishnah, Talmud, Midrash, and Kabbalah, often engaging parallel traditions within these works. Other readings may include excerpts from liturgical, philosophical, and poetic texts.

REL-A 270: INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM (15650)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Student Building Frances Morg 150
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This is an introductory course to the study of Islam designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of the religion. The course begins with the historical emergence of Islam at around the seventh century AD, and concludes with the various forms that Islam has taken in the contemporary era. In-between these bookends, we will read about how Muslims have sought to put into practice the word of God and the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad by configuring and transforming various aspects of social life such as personal piety, education, law, gender relations, and so on. Apart from identifying the core beliefs and cultural practices that have defined Islam, we will also look at issues that have sparked unceasing debate and disagreement between Muslims. Some of the major theoretical concepts that will recur in our discussions include authority, interpretation, tradition, and representation.

REL-R 300: STUDIES IN RELIGION (29922)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Prac Apps Of Religious Stu Edu
Instructor: Jaques, Robert Kevin
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Description: This course will explore how a religious studies education can be applied to various careers outside the academy. Students will work with a range of methods and theories in the study of religion and learn how to apply them in specific everyday contexts. Former students (both Religious Studies majors and those who took only a few courses) will speak to the class after each section and talk about how they have utilized their educations in the academic study of religion. These speakers represent a broad spectrum of professions, such as medicine, education, public relations, human resources, journalism, non-profit management, finance, and fashion merchandising. Requirements: Attendance is required as are weekly reviews of the readings, and a mid-term exam. In addition, each student will work with the service learning center to locate an internship in a chosen area of emphasis. Students will compose a final paper (10-15 pages) that details the outcomes of the service-learning internship and how a particular theory or method explored during the semester was applied during the internship period.

REL-R 300: STUDIES IN RELIGION (29921)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Relspritual Atheism America
Instructor: Selka, Stephen
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 242
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

In recent decades, the number of Americans who identify either as non-religious or "spiritual, not religious" has grown considerably. This is evident, for example, in the increasing popularity of spiritual retreats and atheist conventions around the United States. How do these developments affect our understanding of the American religious landscape and our understanding of what "religion" is more generally? How do these changes reflect wider trends and patterns in American religious history, and in what ways do they represent something new and novel? To the extent that they are new, what broader social, cultural and political changes are these developments related to? In order to address these questions, this course explores the complex and shifting relationship between the religious, the secular and the spiritual. It focuses in particular on the emergence of spirituality as a category of belief and practice and on the growing visibility of atheism in American public life. Students will learn about theory and methods and religious studies, become familiar with American religious history, and explore some of the most pressing issues in the interdisciplinary study of religion today.

REL-D 301: RELIGION AND ITS CRITICS (29923)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Ballantine Hall 322
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course examines the problem of the death of God in modern Christian thought and culture. It does so by exploring the atheistic claim that "God is dead" and the various responses by theologians, philosophers, religious thinkers, and cultural commentators to that claim. Together, we will read and discuss several of the major texts in the death of God literature, ranging from the writings of Martin Luther to those of Friedrich Nietzsche and Albert Camus, with the intent of exploring what this idea might mean for understanding culture, knowledge, life, and, of course, death.

REL-A 316: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, OTHERS (29944)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 135
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

What were the differences and similarities among Jews, Christians, Muslims, and others in the ancient world, and what might these ancient differences and similarities mean for us today? In this course, we will explore the rich variety of religious thought and expression in antiquity, from the time of Jesus and Paul to the age of Muhammad and the Rabbis. We will consider a variety of topics, including: theological disputes about the nature of God and theories of salvation, the role of books and reading in ancient religions, scriptural interpretation, ideologies of sex and gender, and the relationships between the state and religion.

REL-C 330: EVANGELICAL AMERICA (13351)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 205
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-A 335: INTRO TO JEWISH MYSTICISM (29919)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Magid, Shaul
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Fine Arts 010
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 355: ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY (14731)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 336
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-D 410: TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT (29925)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Irony In Religion Literature
Instructor: Harriss, Mathew Cooper
Course Duration: 1/9/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

One frigid morning you happen upon your professor on campus. "It's a lovely warm day!" she says. You pause. This odd statement could mean a number of things: Is your professor crazy? Delirious? Canadian? Or is she joking? She smiles and you realize that by saying the opposite of what she meant, she was being ironic. You laugh, being in on the joke's meaning, but also recognize that in this ironic moment any number of "truths" were equally in play. Religion and literature are both meaning making enterprises. Sometimes their meanings are stable but more often they are not. Life is complicated and the meaning that we give it through literature and/or religion matches this instability. The concept of irony allows us to hold multiple meanings, contradictory truths, in tension, equipping us to deal with the absurdity of reality in meaningful ways - even when there may seem to be no stable meaning. This course considers a few theories of irony as a literary, religious, and political concept and then reads closely in selected literary texts (Shakespeare, Austen, Melville, Faulkner, and Ellison) to consider how irony enriches our readings of these texts (including questions of power, economy, gender, and race) and how the process of reading ironically helps us to understand how religions build communities around the making of meaning through which diverse people and groups may find some agreement (while also keeping others away).

REL-B 420: TOPICS IN HINDU REL TRADITIONS (30353)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Topic Title: The Mahabharata
Instructor: Manring, Rebecca
Course Duration: 3/6/17 — 5/5/17
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM — 8:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 105
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

What is our duty as human beings? In this course we will explore how ancient Indian intellectuals answered this question. The Mahabharata is one of the foundational texts of Indian civilization and is a world classic offering tremendous mythic and psychological insight into the human condition. We will examine that classical Indian epic, stressing its role as a living tradition that is constantly being recreated and reinterpreted. We'll read significant excerpts from the epic itself, alongside recent scholarship on its literary, religious and historical contexts. We'll also consider it as performance tradition and so will view and discuss recordings of several modern stagings of the Mahabharata. Students will also consider recent novels (all available, if not originally written, in English) treating sections of the epic.

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Other courses of interest

CEUS-R 312 Shrine and Pilgrimage in Central Asian Islam

Instructor: DeWeese, D.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: M 2:30p-5:00p
Credit Hours: 3

Surveys religious beliefs and activities involving shrines and pilgrimage to holy places in Muslim Central Asia, from beginning to present. Broadens understanding of how shrines served the religious needs of Central Asian Muslims and the relationship between shrine-centered religious life and "normative" religious practice.

COLL-P 155 PUBLIC ORAL COMUNICATION

Instructor: Bartzel, J.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 1:25p-2:15p or 2:30p-3:20p
Credit Hours: 3

Above class is for students interested in Religious Studies

Prepares students in the liberal arts to communicate effectively with public audiences. Emphasizes oral communication as practiced in public contexts: how to advance reasoned claims in public; how to adapt public oral presentations to particular audiences; how to listen to, interpret, and evaluate public discourse; and how to formulate a clear response.

COLL-C103 Original Sin: Religion and Psychology

Instructor: Furey, C.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 12:2p-1:10p
Credit Hours: 3

The doctrine of Original Sin--the claim that humans don't have free will--has infuriated and intrigued people since it was first articulated by the fourth century Christian bishop, Augustine of Hippo. This theory of human nature suggests that we are captive to impulses beyond our control. Many Christian movements have rejected Augustine's interpretation of the origin story in Genesis, and many secular and religious thinkers alike have offered alternative--and more optimistic--theories of human nature. But Original Sin remains one of the most powerful religious versions of a view shared by many secular and scientific thinkers; that humans cannot freely choose to resist selfish or violent impulses. "Original Sin" traces the enduring influence of this idea by exploring how it has been variously conceived, defended, and challenged. This course serves as an introduction to the study of religions as well as a comparative exploration of religion and psychology. Assignments will include short reading responses, several blog postings, an investigation essay on a topic of your choice, and a take-home final exam.

COLL-C103 Work Hard, Pray Hard

Instructor: Velazquez, S.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 11:15a-12:05p
Credit Hours: 3

No one, not even God, is free from the tolls of labor. And yet, from the Christian Garden of Eden to the Greco-Roman ideal of the Golden Age, human imaginings of perfect happiness emphasize a utopic world where human survival is assured and not dependent on our toils and troubles. Indeed, having to work for one's sustenance ("to eat by the sweat of our brow" Gen 3:19) and to reproduce through painful labor are depicted as divine punishments for human disobedience. And yet, parallel to this punitive vision of work, Christianity also developed an ethos of liberating labor through the institution of monastic orders that exalted manual crafts and meditative practices as a means of salvation. In this class we will examine on the one hand, this twin legacy of labor as punishment and as salvation as it appears in artistic, religious, political and philosophical texts and contexts, and on the other, we will explore the "others" of work (boredom, idleness, leisure). We will consider questions such as: to what extent is our humanity linked to our capacity for work; are we homo sapiens ("knowing men") or homo laborans ("working men")? Is labor gendered? Must labor be productive and produce a profit or can there be leisurely labor? Can labor heal? Why do we call artistic creations works of art? How do ideas of labor as punishment and labor as creation affect the social acceptance of art and artists?

COLL-C103 Power, Politics, and Piety

Instructor: Magid, S.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 12:20p1:10p
Credit Hours: 3

pThis course will examine the political situation in Israel/Palestine from historical, theological, and cultural perspectives with special emphasis given to questions of nationalism and territorialism. We will read primary and secondary literature dealing with modern nationalism and territory, the concept of "land" in Judaism and Islam (using primary sources in translation), the history of Zionism and Palestinian Nationalism, the rise of the anti-nationalist Islamist movement including its roots in British colonialism. We will explore the rise of nationalism in the Middle East more generally including its secular, Marxist, and Islamist roots and will read some classical and contemporary Zionist debates on bi-nationalism, militarism and territorial compromise, and the more contemporary discussion in Israel and Palestine in the media and in the academy. This is not a political science course--meaning we will not debate policy, legislation, and predictions for the future. Rather, we will examine the underlying theological and cultural roots of the political crisis founded on the relationship between territory and national identity. At the end of the semester we will turn to some political commentary on issues of territory and resolution including the Israeli Declaration of Independence, Camp David II, the Hamas Charter, the Geneva Accords, and the Saudi Arabia Peace Plan.

JSTU-J 251 Jewish History: the Bible to Spanish Expulsion

Instructor: Gonzalez Dieguez, G.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 2:30p-3:45p
Credit Hours: 3

This course introduces students to various aspects of Judaism from the Biblical Era to the Middle Ages. Key historical events to be studied include the origins of the ancient Israelites; the composition of the Hebrew Bible; the destruction of the Second Temple; the Jewish encounter with Hellenism; the rise of the Rabbis and Rabbinic Literature; symbiosis and conflict between Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Europe; and the Spanish Expulsion. As we work our way through these major stages of Jewish history, we also pay close attention to the formation of religious ideas and practices that characterize Jewish life in each period, such as monotheism, covenant, Torah, temple, liturgy, mysticism, and diaspora. Course readings incorporate a large selection of primary texts in translation alongside secondary literature from various introductory-level books. Assignments include exams and short research papers.

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