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REL-R 133: INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION (8592)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Morrison Hall 007
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

What is this thing that we call religion? And how should we study it? This course introduces students to the many different ways in which modern scholars of religion have tried to answer these questions. In examining the history of religious studies, students will discover that much of our current knowledge about religion is founded upon competing claims about the existence of God, the value of religion in shaping individual and collective psychology, the origins of religious practice and consciousness, and the role that religion plays in structuring culture and society. In other words, students will come out of this class not so much with a better understanding of their own religious tradition. Rather, they will acquire an informed, sophisticated, and ultimately meaningful way to talk about religion.

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30797)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM — 9:55 AM
Location: Student Building Frances Morg 131
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30794)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: R 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30795)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: R 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Spruce Hall B109
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30796)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: R 5:45 PM — 6:35 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 018
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30793)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Ernie Pyle Hall 220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30799)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Student Building Frances Morg 131
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30798)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Student Building Frances Morg 131
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (12834)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Haberman, David L.
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: R 5:45 PM — 6:35 PM
Location: Swain East 010
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (12836)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Haberman, David L.
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: R 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Swain East 010
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (12833)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Haberman, David L.
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Wells Library 033
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (12835)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Haberman, David L.
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: R 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Swain East 010
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (11277)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: R 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Jordan Hall A106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (11280)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (11281)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (11282)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Briscoe Quad C232
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (11276)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (11279)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: R 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Jordan Hall A106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (11278)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: R 5:45 PM — 6:35 PM
Location: Jordan Hall A106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-B 210: INTRODUCTION TO BUDDHISM (7326)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Nance, Richard F.
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Cedar Hall C006
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to Buddhism, broadly conceived. We will survey the development of Buddhist thought and practice, from its origins in India to its subsequent expansions into other parts of the world. The course has two main aims: to familiarize you with basic Buddhist ideas and practices as these have taken shape in various historical and cultural settings, and to invite you to think critically and carefully about these ideas and practices and what they imply for those who espouse and engage in them. In pursuit of these aims, we will be reading a number of primary sources in translation, together with several additional texts that will help you to contextualize this material. We will be screening several films as well. No previous knowledge of Buddhism is necessary, nor will any be presumed.

REL-A 210: INTR OLD TESTAMNT/HEBREW BIBLE (12839)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Mokhtarian, Jason Sion
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-B 220: INTRODUCTION TO HINDUISM (12848)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Manring, Rebecca
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Wells Library 031
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

"Hinduism" is the umbrella term for the vast and multifaceted traditions of at least 80% of the people of India, and of about one out of every five human beings on earth right now. In this short semester we can only begin to wrap our minds around its richness and diversity! Our goal is to gain some understanding and appreciation of the religious culture of many of those with whom we share this planet, to expand our own ideas of what it means to be human, and to broaden our understanding of what "religion" is. Using the recurrent themes of Creation, Preservation, and Destruction we will examine a variety of Indian religious expressions and explore their meanings. Central to our exploration will be the constant tensions between various strands of Hinduism: renunciation vs. sensual desire, monism vs. monotheism vs. polytheism, social duty vs. personal freedom, and more. The challenge is to allow ourselves to accept that seemingly opposite tendencies are not necessarily mutually exclusive, and that we can hold more than one perspective at a time. Such is the extraordinary richness of religious expression in India, from time immemorial to the present day.

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (12843)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Teter Quad F106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (12840)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Chemistry 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (12842)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Teter Quad F106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 220: INTRO TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (12841)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Teter Quad F106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-A 250: INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIANITY (30801)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Geological Sciences 126
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-A 270: INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM (11272)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Jaques, Robert Kevin
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Wylie Hall 015
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This is an introductory course to the study of Islam designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of the religion. The course begins with the historical emergence of Islam at around the seventh century AD, and concludes with the various forms that Islam has taken in the contemporary era. In-between these bookends, we will read about how Muslims have sought to put into practice the word of God and the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad by configuring and transforming various aspects of social life such as personal piety, education, law, gender relations, and so on. Apart from identifying the core beliefs and cultural practices that have defined Islam, we will also look at issues that have sparked unceasing debate and disagreement between Muslims. Some of the major theoretical concepts that will recur in our discussions include authority, interpretation, tradition, and representation.

REL-R 300: STUDIES IN RELIGION (30800)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Rel Spirituality Secularism
Instructor: Selka, Stephen
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 10/12/18
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM — 8:15 PM
Location: Global International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

In recent decades, the number of Americans who identify as non-religious or "spiritual but not religious" has grown considerably. This is evident, for example, in the increasing popularity of spiritual retreats and atheist conventions around the United States. How do these developments affect our understanding of the American religious landscape and our understanding of what "religion" is more generally? How do these changes reflect wider trends and patterns in American religious history, and in what ways do they represent something new? To the extent that they are novel, what broader social, cultural and political changes are these developments related to? In order to address these questions, this course explores the complex and shifting relationship between the categories of religion, spirituality, and science. It focuses in particular on the emergence of spirituality as a category of belief and practice, as well as on the complicated relationship between religion and science. Although the categories of religion and science are often defined in opposition to one another, for example, one of the main concerns of the course is to explore the many ways in which they overlap, including in the discourse of spirituality. Students in this course will learn about theory and methods in religious studies, become familiar with American religious history, and explore some of the most pressing issues in the interdisciplinary study of religion today.

REL-A 300: STUDIES IN AFRI EUR&WST AS REL (30807)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Seeing Islam Thru Muslim Fictn
Instructor: Jaques, Robert Kevin
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM — 7:00 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

The purpose of the course is to explore contemporary Muslim religious experiences through fiction written by Muslim authors. By using genres as diverse as romance, historical fiction, spy thrillers, and fantasy the course will examine how Muslim authors have used fiction to represent different religious ideas and worldviews in the 20th and 21st centuries. By the end of the course you should be able to identify: the four major intellectual and cultural forces that shape contemporary Muslim thought and practice; how Muslims who seek shelter in the West as immigrants and refugees are forced to redefine social and inter-personal norms, how these redefinitions influence Muslim views of Muslim identity, Islam, the West, and the "double consciousness" the authors describe as forming the foundation of the Western/Muslim Self; how and why authors frequently juxtapose issues such as sexual, emotional, and physical abuse with phenomena such as terrorism, war, and cultural conflict to rethink the locus of conflict on the body of the (usually female) individual; and how and why authors frequently present the Muslim community as a feminized subject to depict the threatened status and physical weakness of the Muslim world as it relates to the West. Required readings will include Naguib Mahfouz, Children of the Alley, Yasmina Khadra, The Attack, Monica Ali, Brick Lane, Pramoedya Toer, The Girl from the Coast, and Mohsin Hamid, The Reluctant Fundamentalist.

REL-B 310: EAST ASIAN BUDDHISM (30811)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Blair, Heather Elizabeth
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 214
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This discussion-oriented course introduces students to Buddhism in China, Korea, Japan, and their cultural diasporas. The basic question driving the course is: how do East Asian Buddhists past and present use religion to construct and interpret their worlds? The course is divided into four units. First, we will examine Buddhist cosmology, that is, the ways the world, from the heavens down to the hells, is imagined. Next we will explore the monastery as a site for dedicated practice by religious specialists (mostly, but not exclusively, monks and nuns). Then we will look at the question of how rulers have used Buddhism for political purposes. Finally, we will study pilgrimage, which brings people from all walks of life to sacred places. Course materials draw from both primary and secondary sources, and range from the classical to the contemporary, from scripture to film. There are no pre-requisites; however, those with no background in Buddhism or East Asian cultures are especially encouraged to come to office hours and may need to put in some extra effort at the beginning of the semester. Course requirements include regular attendance, participation in discussion, four quizzes, and two short papers.

REL-C 325: RACE, REL & ETHNIC IN AMERICAS (12837)

Instructor: Selka, Stephen
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 10/12/18
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM — 8:15 PM
Location: Swain East 245
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): S&H DUS

This course examines the various intersections of religion, race, and ethnicity in the Americas. It introduces students to approaches and concepts from religious studies and from the interdisciplinary study of race and ethnicity. Our starting point in the course is the idea that religion, race, and ethnicity are not given or stable categories, but concepts that change over time, vary across contexts, and are often constructed in relation to one another. We will explore these ideas across the Americas and by looking at four major topics: religion and immigration in the United States, particularly in immigration to the US in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; African American and African Diaspora religions, ranging from Christianity in the US to African-derived Candombl in Brazil; and religion and ethnonationalism, including examples from Canada, Brazil, and Mexico. Our scope will not be limited to those topics, but they will provide our primary focus.

REL-C 345: DISASTER: AMER RELIGN & CULTRE (30804)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Harriss, Mathew Cooper
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 211
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

Disasters lead to questions. "Why?" "How?" Even "where is God in the midst of all this?" People often turn to artistic expression in the attempt to find answers for these questions. This course focuses on four American disasters and the artistic production they have spawned (Titanic movies, the 1927 flood and blues music, Indian eradication and the Ghost Dance, and 9/11 graphic novels) to think about how these cultural forms attempt to provide order in chaos, seeking to find answers for what is essentially unanswerable about suffering as a human experience.

REL-A 355: ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY (30812)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 211
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course offers an in-depth study of modern Orthodox Christianity, the second largest Christian denomination in the world. Students will explore the various experiences of Orthodox believers, and the ways they interpret those experiences, in the context of religious rivalry, war, revolution, and oppression. Here we will see a faith community confront Antichrist and atheists, heretics and heathens, radicals and revolutionaries, all in an effort to defeat the "synagogue of Satan" and realize the Kingdom of God.

REL-D 375: RELIGION AND LITERATURE (30805)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Yng Adult Chldn Literature
Instructor: Blair, Heather Elizabeth
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 006
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 389: MAJORS SEMINAR IN RELIGION (30806)

intensive writing

Topic Title: Vulnerability And Resilience
Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Lindley Hall 016
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): IW

Vulnerability and resilience have become important terms of study for philosophers, theologians, psychologists, social workers, and those involved in public policy. This seminar will look at themes of vulnerability and resilience across various disciplines and fields of study with the aim of students producing a research paper investigating these themes in religious traditions of their choice. We will read the work of ethicists, feminist philosophers, political thinkers, social workers, and theologians in thinking through questions such as what is vulnerability? What is resilience? How have these terms been understood? How have scholars worked to rehabilitate these terms? How might these terms continue to be reshaped and rethought? And most importantly, how relevant are vulnerability and resilience to human flourishing? This course is writing intensive (IW).

REL-C 402: RELIGION, ILLNESS, AND HEALING (9965)

intensive writing arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Lindley Hall 030
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): IW A&H DUS

REL-B 414: BUDDHIST PHILOSOPHY IN INDIA (30823)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Nance, Richard F.
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Wylie Hall 111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course surveys the historical development of Buddhist philosophy in India. We will begin by briefly reviewing some of the basic contours of early Indian Buddhist philosophical reflection. Following this review, we will read and discuss several texts by thinkers of seminal importance to Buddhist tradition, focusing on how these thinkers posed and attempted to answer questions regarding the self, reality, reasoning, knowledge, belief, conduct, and liberation. Students who enroll will be expected to participate in extensive in-class discussion.

REL-A 470: TOPICS IN ISLAMIC STUDIES (30821)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Topic Title: Contemporary Study Of Islam
Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Course Duration: 8/20/18 — 12/14/18
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Global International Studies 0005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

Utilizing the critical lenses of anthropology and ethnography, this course examines the ways that Islam influences culture and society in the contemporary world. We will draw upon scholarship of different social contexts, from the Middle East to Southeast Asia and the Western world, to investigate the contributions made by Islam in fields as diverse as art and aesthetic production, finance and banking, organ transplantation and other medical procedures, law and politics, resource extraction and environmental protection, and expressions of gender identity and sexual preferences. Students will acquire some familiarity with critical concepts such as tradition, self-cultivation, embodiment, everyday religion, and global assemblages. In addition to our theoretical focus, we will also pay close attention to the politics of representing Islam in the contemporary context. As such, we will supplement our reading of academic texts with an analysis of popular sources like documentaries, cartoons, comics, newspapers, and magazines.

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Other courses of interest

COLL-C103 Buddhism and Popular Culture

Instructor: Blair, H.
Course Duration: 1/8/18 - 5/4/18
Day & Time: MF 10:10a-11:00a
Credit Hours: 3

Popular media such as anime (video animation), manga (comic-books), and live-action film are not “just” fantasy. Similarly, TV and newspapers don’t “just” inform us. Rather, they create new realities by shaping our values and social identities. In this course, students will examine three major questions: What kinds of relationships connect popular culture to religion—specifically Buddhism? In the global context that we now inhabit, what does it mean to be an authentic and responsible participant in popular culture? And what does it mean to be Buddhist? Course materials draw from a range of disciplines, such as religious studies, anthropology, and media studies. We will also be watching films and reading popular treatments of Buddhism. Requirements include regular attendance; active participation in discussion; timely completion of course readings; several exams; short weekly writing assignments; and a final paper. Though scheduled as a lecture, this course emphasizes discussion and peer interaction: students will regularly work with small groups during class sessions.

COLL-C103 Work Hard, Pray Hard

Instructor: Velazquez, S..
Course Duration: 1/8/18 - 5/4/18
Day & Time: MW 11:15a-12:05p
Credit Hours: 3

No one, not even God, is free from the tolls of labor. And yet, from the Christian Garden of Eden to the Greco-Roman ideal of the Golden Age, human imaginings of perfect happiness emphasize a utopic world where human survival is assured and not dependent on our toils and troubles. Indeed, having to work for one’s sustenance (‘to eat by the sweat of our brow” Gen 3:19) and to reproduce through painful labor are depicted as divine punishments for human disobedience. And yet, parallel to this punitive vision of work, Christianity also developed an ethos of liberating labor through the institution of monastic orders that exalted manual crafts and meditative practices as means of salvation. In this class we will examine on the one hand, this twin legacy of labor as punishment and as salvation as it appears in artistic, religious, political and philosophical texts and contexts, and on the other, we will explore the “others” of work (boredom, idleness, leisure). We will consider questions such as: to what extent is our humanity linked to our capacity for work: are we homo sapiens (‘knowing men”) or homo laborans (‘working men”)? Is labor gendered? Must labor be productive and produce a profit or can there be leisurely labor? Can labor heal? Why do we call artistic creations works of art? How do ideas of labor as punishment and labor as creation affect the social acceptance of art and artists?

COLL-C103 Critical Approaches: Social and Historical: Global tourism

Instructor: Selka, S.
Course Duration: 1/8/18 - 5/4/18
Day & Time: TR 12:20p-1:10p
Credit Hours: 3

This course focuses on transnational tourism, a major aspect of globalization that involves the cross-cultural consumption of experience. Our readings and discussions will center on the complex relationships among different kinds of tourists, tourism organizations, cultural representations, and host communities. Questions that we will explore include: How does tourism affect local communities, such as through economic, political and environmental impacts? What kinds of power relations are entailed between the “hosts and guests” who are involved with tourism? What kinds of desires and fantasies, and promises of gratification, motivate tourists to travel? In what ways in tourism similar to religious pilgrimage? How do forms of travel that are for religious or spiritual purposes relate to tourism? We will begin the course with an overview of basic concepts in the study of tourism and travel and proceed to discuss several case studies from across the Americas. Students will become familiar with critical approaches to the analysis of tourism and travel from anthropology, religious studies, and related disciplines.

FOLK-F 722 The Black Messiah: Music, Religion, & Activism

Instructor: Jones, A.
Course Duration: 1/8/18 - 5/4/18
Day & Time: M 3:00p-5:30p
Credit Hours: 3

Since 2013, there has been a resurgence in aural-visual interpretations of the black messiah as represented in the cinematic revival of Langston Hughes’ gospel play The Black Nativity (2013), the controversial cable television show Black Jesus (2014), D’Angelo’s highly anticipated Black Messiah (2014) album and the forthcoming feature film The Revival! Experience (2015) starring musician Mali Music. We will examine musical performances of the black messiah through the prism of race/gender/class throughout popular ideological and religious expressions from the African diaspora such as spiritualism, Nation of Islam, Rastafarianism, and Hebrew Israelites. In addition, our discussions will center on the ways in which black messianism is articulated by exploring marginalized conceptual frameworks that include womanism, chiliasm, cult of personality, and the common goals of nationalistic teachings. With attention to this vast area of scholarship, we will ask: what is the sound of black messianism? How might we undertake an anti-oppression listening of sonic worlds?