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REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (15211)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 108
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (12414)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Wendell W. Wright 1120
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (15210)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 108
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (15209)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM — 1:10 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 108
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (15206)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM — 9:55 AM
Location: Sycamore Hall 108
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (15207)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Sycamore Hall 108
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (15208)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 200
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (30060)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (30061)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (30059)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (30054)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (30057)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM — 1:10 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (30053)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (9692)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 100
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (32302)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Bartzel, Joe
Course Duration: 3/7/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: TR 6:50 PM — 8:50 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 202: TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (30345)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Religion And Sports
Instructor: Harriss, Mathew Cooper
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 240
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

On the appointed day supplicants file into the sacred chamber wearing the appropriate colors and symbols on their bodies and clothing. They chant in unison the words inherited from their ancestors, standing and sitting at crucial moments as they implore powers beyond themselves to intervene in human affairs, to vanquish the forces of evil, tilting the balance and bringing forth another Hoosier basketball victory over Purdue. This course considers the many ways that religion and sports are alike and argues that you can learn a great deal about one through careful attention to the other. We'll consider how fans treat sporting events like sacred rites, examine the civil religion of the Super Bowl, delve into sports as religion (as with surfing), the peril of religious athletes (Tim Tebow, Sandy Koufax, or Muhammad Ali, for instance), sacred space, holy violence, and shrines of sacred memory (as with halls of fame). By the end of the semester you should have a new and deeper appreciation of the fascinating and complicated ways religion works that comes from looking closer at seemingly familiar materials. At the same time, you'll never participate in or observe even a simple sporting event again in quite the same way.

REL-R 202: TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (30346)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Death
Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course will explore several issues under the broad topic of "death." In particular we will study various cultural responses to personal death (i.e., one¿s own death) and the death of others, as well as various cultural responses to grief associated with the loss of significant things. We will spend much of the semester thinking about questions such as, how have people thought about death? How do people cope with personal death anxiety? How have various cultures dealt with the grief associated with losing someone significant? In thinking through these questions we will read the work of contemporary philosophers, anthropologists, and scholars of religious studies. This will involve learning about early China, ancient Greece, and contemporary Europe and the United States. Students who take this class will be able to understand the role of mourning across cultures, analyze various approaches to coping with anxieties associated with death, and think through the ways in which death might influence how people live their lives. Assignments include summaries of readings, a mid-term paper (four to six pages), and a final exam.

REL-R 202: TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (30348)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Death
Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 235
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course will explore several issues under the broad topic of "death." In particular we will study various cultural responses to personal death (i.e., one¿s own death) and the death of others, as well as various cultural responses to grief associated with the loss of significant things. We will spend much of the semester thinking about questions such as, how have people thought about death? How do people cope with personal death anxiety? How have various cultures dealt with the grief associated with losing someone significant? In thinking through these questions we will read the work of contemporary philosophers, anthropologists, and scholars of religious studies. This will involve learning about early China, ancient Greece, and contemporary Europe and the United States. Students who take this class will be able to understand the role of mourning across cultures, analyze various approaches to coping with anxieties associated with death, and think through the ways in which death might influence how people live their lives. Assignments include summaries of readings, a mid-term paper (four to six pages), and a final exam.

REL-R 202: TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (30338)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Religion And Sports
Instructor: Harriss, Mathew Cooper
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 240
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

On the appointed day supplicants file into the sacred chamber wearing the appropriate colors and symbols on their bodies and clothing. They chant in unison the words inherited from their ancestors, standing and sitting at crucial moments as they implore powers beyond themselves to intervene in human affairs, to vanquish the forces of evil, tilting the balance and bringing forth another Hoosier basketball victory over Purdue. This course considers the many ways that religion and sports are alike and argues that you can learn a great deal about one through careful attention to the other. We'll consider how fans treat sporting events like sacred rites, examine the civil religion of the Super Bowl, delve into sports as religion (as with surfing), the peril of religious athletes (Tim Tebow, Sandy Koufax, or Muhammad Ali, for instance), sacred space, holy violence, and shrines of sacred memory (as with halls of fame). By the end of the semester you should have a new and deeper appreciation of the fascinating and complicated ways religion works that comes from looking closer at seemingly familiar materials. At the same time, you'll never participate in or observe even a simple sporting event again in quite the same way.

REL-R 202: TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (30347)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Death
Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 235
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course will explore several issues under the broad topic of "death." In particular we will study various cultural responses to personal death (i.e., one¿s own death) and the death of others, as well as various cultural responses to grief associated with the loss of significant things. We will spend much of the semester thinking about questions such as, how have people thought about death? How do people cope with personal death anxiety? How have various cultures dealt with the grief associated with losing someone significant? In thinking through these questions we will read the work of contemporary philosophers, anthropologists, and scholars of religious studies. This will involve learning about early China, ancient Greece, and contemporary Europe and the United States. Students who take this class will be able to understand the role of mourning across cultures, analyze various approaches to coping with anxieties associated with death, and think through the ways in which death might influence how people live their lives. Assignments include summaries of readings, a mid-term paper (four to six pages), and a final exam.

REL-R 202: TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (30344)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Religion And Sports
Instructor: Harriss, Mathew Cooper
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 240
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

On the appointed day supplicants file into the sacred chamber wearing the appropriate colors and symbols on their bodies and clothing. They chant in unison the words inherited from their ancestors, standing and sitting at crucial moments as they implore powers beyond themselves to intervene in human affairs, to vanquish the forces of evil, tilting the balance and bringing forth another Hoosier basketball victory over Purdue. This course considers the many ways that religion and sports are alike and argues that you can learn a great deal about one through careful attention to the other. We'll consider how fans treat sporting events like sacred rites, examine the civil religion of the Super Bowl, delve into sports as religion (as with surfing), the peril of religious athletes (Tim Tebow, Sandy Koufax, or Muhammad Ali, for instance), sacred space, holy violence, and shrines of sacred memory (as with halls of fame). By the end of the semester you should have a new and deeper appreciation of the fascinating and complicated ways religion works that comes from looking closer at seemingly familiar materials. At the same time, you'll never participate in or observe even a simple sporting event again in quite the same way.

REL-R 202: TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (30246)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Death
Instructor: Ing, Michael Kaulana
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: TR 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 330
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course will explore several issues under the broad topic of "death." In particular we will study various cultural responses to personal death (i.e., one¿s own death) and the death of others, as well as various cultural responses to grief associated with the loss of significant things. We will spend much of the semester thinking about questions such as, how have people thought about death? How do people cope with personal death anxiety? How have various cultures dealt with the grief associated with losing someone significant? In thinking through these questions we will read the work of contemporary philosophers, anthropologists, and scholars of religious studies. This will involve learning about early China, ancient Greece, and contemporary Europe and the United States. Students who take this class will be able to understand the role of mourning across cultures, analyze various approaches to coping with anxieties associated with death, and think through the ways in which death might influence how people live their lives. Assignments include summaries of readings, a mid-term paper (four to six pages), and a final exam.

REL-A 202: ISS AFRI EURO&WEST ASIAN REL (14994)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Can Christ Be Saved
Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 103
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

In its severe attacks against religious belief, the radical French Enlightenment (circa 1750) leveled a devastating critique against the authority of Jesus as the Son of God. Responding to these challenges, successive generations of European theologians and religious thinkers (circa 1770-1920) tried to make Jesus once again relevant and meaningful to modern audiences. In the process, they, too, abandoned the traditional pillars of Christ's authority (such as miracles and prophecy), settling instead on claims about cultural and historical progress, inner religious experience, free choice, even foolishness and personal apocalypse. This course examines these wide-ranging attempts to save Christ and the paradoxes they engendered through a close reading of key texts by Kant, Hegel, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, and other important figures in the history of modern European Christian thought.

REL-A 202: ISS AFRI EURO&WEST ASIAN REL (30067)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Bibles Bodies Reformation
Instructor: Furey, Constance
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 105
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Are Christians saved by faith alone? Who decides how to interpret the Bible? What do religious rituals do exactly? Is it what we feel with our heart that matters, or what we do with our bodies? These fundamental questions, and the fact that they are seen as crucial questions still today, demonstrates the enduring significance of the Protestant Reformation. These were questions that became matters of life and death at the time of the Protestant Reformation, when disagreements about how they should be answered created enduring fault lines within Christianity. These debates from the sixteenth century also continue to influence the way religion is perceived today: are religious rituals significant? Or irrelevant? When and why? In this course we will examine Reformation debates from a modern perspective, beginning with a short story by Flannery O'Connor and ending with a great twentieth century movie. In between, we'll study the way Protestants and Catholics celebrated, condemned, and debated the significance of bodies and bibles. You will leave this class not only with knowledge of specific Catholic and Protestant debates but also a framework for understanding modern assumptions about "good" religion and "bad" religion. Requirements include regular posts, participation, and a take-home midterm and final.

REL-R 202: TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (30231)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Religion And Sports
Instructor: Harriss, Mathew Cooper
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Chemistry 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

On the appointed day supplicants file into the sacred chamber wearing the appropriate colors and symbols on their bodies and clothing. They chant in unison the words inherited from their ancestors, standing and sitting at crucial moments as they implore powers beyond themselves to intervene in human affairs, to vanquish the forces of evil, tilting the balance and bringing forth another Hoosier basketball victory over Purdue. This course considers the many ways that religion and sports are alike and argues that you can learn a great deal about one through careful attention to the other. We'll consider how fans treat sporting events like sacred rites, examine the civil religion of the Super Bowl, delve into sports as religion (as with surfing), the peril of religious athletes (Tim Tebow, Sandy Koufax, or Muhammad Ali, for instance), sacred space, holy violence, and shrines of sacred memory (as with halls of fame). By the end of the semester you should have a new and deeper appreciation of the fascinating and complicated ways religion works that comes from looking closer at seemingly familiar materials. At the same time, you'll never participate in or observe even a simple sporting event again in quite the same way.

REL-D 202: ISS THEORY, ETHICS&COMPARISONS (15746)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Deadly Vices Chrstin Tradition
Instructor: Swan Tuite, James Elliott
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 103
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Deadly vices and behavioral excesses have been a perennial concern in western Christian life due to their self-deceptive, disorienting and destructive tendencies. Traditionally identified as a special class of vices (anger, greed, sloth, pride, lust, envy, and gluttony) or "deadly sins" that thoroughly undermined human flourishing, these behaviors and their consequences remain central concerns in American life from the rise of addiction medicine and self-help practices to public and private initiatives designed to confront the causes and consequences of these behaviors such as Prohibition, the War on Drugs, and domestic violence intervention programs. The course surveys the origins and continuing significance of the deadly vices in western life from pre-modern conceptions of the eight evil thoughts and seven deadly sins to modern interrogations and re-framing of behavioral excess. In addition to theological, philosophical and psychological writings about vice an. behavioral excess, this course also draws on representations of vice from literature, art, cinema and popular media.

REL-A 210: INTR OLD TESTAMNT/HEBREW BIBLE (10801)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Mokhtarian, Jason Sion
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Myers Hall 130
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

The Hebrew Bible is a foundational text of Western civilization. The goal of this course is to familiarize you with this collection and to understand its development over time in an ancient culture that was radically different from our own. Besides the texts that make up the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, we will also consider non-biblical texts that were written and read in the same period, including writings from the Dead Sea Scrolls, placing them in a broader historical and cultural context of Jewish Antiquity. How were these writings created, interpreted, used, and collected by ancient communities in the formative period that gave birth to Judaism and Christianity? Throughout the course, we will discuss how the texts of the Hebrew Bible have been read and interpreted in very different ways by ancient religious communities and by modern biblical scholars. This approach is meant to encourage reflection on our own reading practices, and to understand how the assumptions we bring to a text, and the context in which we read it, affect the meanings that it comes to make.

REL-B 220: INTRODUCTION TO HINDUISM (30073)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Manring, Rebecca
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Lindley Hall 102
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

"Hinduism" is the umbrella term for the vast and multifaceted traditions of at least 80% of the people of India, and of about one out of every five human beings on earth right now. In this short semester we can only begin to wrap our minds around its richness and diversity! Our goal is to gain some understanding and appreciation of the religious culture of many of those with whom we share this planet, to expand our own ideas of what it means to be human, and to broaden our understanding of what "religion" is. Using the recurrent themes of Creation, Preservation, and Destruction we will examine a variety of Indian religious expressions and explore their meanings. Central to our exploration will be the constant tensions between various strands of Hinduism: renunciation vs. sensual desire, monism vs. monotheism vs. polytheism, social duty vs. personal freedom, and more. The challenge is to allow ourselves to accept that seemingly opposite tendencies are not necessarily mutually exclusive, and that we can hold more than one perspective at a time. Such is the extraordinary richness of religious expression in India, from time immemorial to the present day.

REL-D 250: RELIGION, ECOLOGY & THE SELF (30074)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Haberman, David L.
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Radio-TV 251
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

The essence of Deep Ecology is to ask deeper questions. We face many problems in the world today; many argue that these problems are deeply interconnected. Deep Ecology is one response to global problems. It seeks fundamental transformations in our views of world and self, claiming that there is no ontological divide in the forms of life. Deep Ecology, therefore, aims for an environmentally sustainable and spiritually rich way of life that recognizes the intrinsic value of all life forms and the enchantment of the world. This course involves an introductory examination of Deep Ecology from a Religious Studies perspective that investigates traditions in terms of their thought, action, and communities.

REL-A 270: INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM (29902)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Radio-TV 251
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This is an introductory course to the study of Islam designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of the religion. The course begins with the historical emergence of Islam at around the seventh century AD, and concludes with the various forms that Islam has taken in the contemporary era. In-between these bookends, we will read about how Muslims have sought to put into practice the word of God and the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad by configuring and transforming various aspects of social life such as personal piety, education, law, gender relations, and so on. Apart from identifying the core beliefs and cultural practices that have defined Islam, we will also look at issues that have sparked unceasing debate and disagreement between Muslims. Some of the major theoretical concepts that will recur in our discussions include authority, interpretation, tradition, and representation.

REL-C 300: ISSUES IN RELIGION IN AMERICAS (32303)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: New Media And Digital Religion
Instructor: Cooper, Travis Warren
Course Duration: 3/7/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM — 7:45 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 242
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

How do emerging religious traditions cultivate Internet presences? How are people using online technologies and new media forms-for example, social networks including Facebook or Twitter; image sharing programs such as Instagram or Flickr; church, synagogue, or mosque websites; blog or text-based platforms; or video sharing formats like YouTube or Vimeo-to spread information, build communities, promote teachings, organize (online) rituals, debate theological principles, or construct and maintain social, cultural, and religious boundaries? How do new media facilitate, enable, or constrain discourse? How are new media forms mediating interactions, relations, and communications between both competitive religious traditions and among people of particular religious collectives? Aside from excavating popular media ideologies that inform peoples' ideas of how technologies and social networks ought to work, this course will explore broad and multi-modal intersections between Internet-enabled technologies and religious traditions in the Americas. We will investigate a number of conceptual categories (including gender, sexuality, politics, power, ritual, and economics) embedded in user-generated-content online by drawing on digital ethnographic methods and employing discourse, text, and rhetoric analysis.

REL-C 300: ISSUES IN RELIGION IN AMERICAS (13026)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Religionthe U.s.constitution
Instructor: Sullivan, Winnifred Fallers
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

The constitutional role of religion in the public life of Americans has been debated since the creation of the country. In this class we will examine the ways in which the US Constitution structures the religious lives of americans through a close examination of significant Supreme Court decisions in the broader context of US social and political history and the regulation of these matters elsewhere in the world. The text we will use is a casebook designed for law school use. Assessment will be based on weekly responses and a final exam.

REL-A 316: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, OTHERS (30249)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Mokhtarian, Jason Sion
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course explores the interactions between Jews, Christians, and other religious groups in antiquity, especially in Roman Palestine and Sasanian Persia circa the first through seventh centuries C.E. In this class we pay particular attention to the portrayals of Christians in ancient Jewish literature, but we also draw from early Christian and other sources. In this course students explore such questions as: How did Jews define themselves in relation to Christians, and vice versa? In what ways did Jews and Christians part ways with one another, as scholars often maintain? And, lastly, what role did other groups play, such as Zoroastrians, Gnostics, and Manichaeans, in this development? This course assumes no prior background in religious studies.

REL-C 323: JEWS AND RACE (30266)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Swain East 105
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

Are Jews white? Are Jews a race? How does the Jewish community relate to "other" races? This class will explore the wide spectrum of ways American Jews have thought of themselves in relation to the idea of race and how the answers to these questions changed over time. Looking at both contemporary and historical sources, we will discuss how Jews fit into the racial landscape in different times and places. This course will analyze the complex relationship of Jews and African Americans, from slavery to Jim Crow to Civil Rights to the incident in Crown Heights. It will also consider topics such as Sephardi and Mizrahi Jews in the United States, the place of Jews as immigrants and subjects of "race science" in the early twentieth century, contemporary scientific ideas about DNA, the role of race in American Jewish literature, music, and theater, and the contemporary realities of Jews of different races through adoption, conversion, and intermarriage.

REL-C 330: EVANGELICAL AMERICA (13038)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

From eighteenth-century Great Awakening revivals to twenty-first-century presidential campaigns, evangelicals¿and Pentecostal and Charismatic movements within evangelicalism¿have played a vital role in shaping American cultural, social, and political institutions. Who are evangelicals? What do they believe, and how do they behave? Should non-evangelicals be worried about them? This course explores the causes, nature, and implications of evangelical influence through the lenses of history, literature, and religious studies-drawing upon fiction, poetry, autobiography, music, television, film, ethnography, and food.

REL-D 350: RELIGION, ETHICS & ENVIRONMENT (15041)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Sideris, Lisa H
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Student Building 131
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course is built upon an examination of the relationship of humans to the rest of the natural world and its inhabitants. The course surveys various religious and secular/philosophical schools of thought in environmental ethics (e.g. ecotheology and nature religions, ecofeminism, 'land ethics,' animals rights and liberation, science-based approaches, etc). Topics concerning ethics and the environment may include: instrumental and intrinsic value in nature and animals; anthropocentrism; individualistic versus holistic ethics; ecological and evolutionary science; obligations to future generations; population; climate change and energy depletion; diminishing species; environmental justice, economics and sustainability. This class will explore dilemmas associated with these issues, and will provide a forum for students to understand, articulate, and defend their own personal environmental worldviews.

REL-A 355: ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY (15021)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Sycamore Hall 105
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course offers an in-depth study of modern Orthodox Christianity, the second largest Christian denomination in the world. Students will explore the various experiences of Orthodox believers, and the ways they interpret those experiences, in the context of religious rivalry, war, revolution, and oppression. Here we will see a faith community confront Antichrist and atheists, heretics and heathens, radicals and revolutionaries, all in an effort to defeat the "synagogue of Satan" and realize the Kingdom of God.

REL-R 389: MAJORS SEMINAR IN RELIGION (10803)

intensive writing

Topic Title: Religion And Fantasy
Instructor: Blair, Heather Elizabeth
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Lindley Hall 019
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): IW

This discussion-intensive seminar looks at the relationship of religion and fantasy in two ways. It asks whether religion is-or can be-a type of fantasy, and it examines how fantasy makes use of-and often acts like-religion. We will be reading theoretical works by thinkers like Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud, as well as recent academic articles, science fiction, and fantasy novels. We will also watch a couple of films. The main requirements for this course are regular participation in class discussions, short weekly postings, and completion of an independent research project. This course carries intensive writing (IW) credit. Please note that this semester this course is open to BOTH majors AND minors in Religious Studies. For help registering, please contact Mary Nuznov (mnuznov@indiana.edu) and/or Heather Blair (heablair@indiana.edu).

REL-B 420: TOPICS IN HINDU REL TRADITIONS (30352)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Topic Title: Explre Hindu Txtbhagavad-gita
Instructor: Haberman, David L.
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 212
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

The Bhagavad Gita is sometimes referred to today as the "Bible" of Hinduism. This text has been favored by many Hindus (it was Gandhi's favorite text), and even non-Hindus such as the New England Transcendentalists (Thoreau and Emerson). Almost every major Hindu thinker has written a commentary on the Bhagavad Gita. This text, however, was composed in a specific cultural context and expresses a very particular religious philosophy. This seminar involves a close reading and deep exploration of the Bhagavad Gita, examining it for both universal themes and distinctive cultural expressions. It also aims to teach students to generate and pursue textual questions, thereby empowering productive readings of religious texts.

REL-A 420: RELIGIONS OF ANCIENT ROME (30270)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Topic Title: The Age Of Constantine
Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 6:50 PM — 7:40 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0006
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

A focused study of the textual and material sources for the study of religion, culture, and politics in the age of Diocletian and Constantine (roughly 280-340 CE), Readings will be in English translation, though students with background in Latin or Greek may elect to do some work in original languages. Throughout the course. the members of the class will collaborate in producing an online resource, "Constantinian Texts and Documents," a webpage that will collect key documentary and literary sources directly related to Constantine and his court (e.g. imperial letters, speeches, etc.). Students will help to produce scholarly notes and commentaries on these sources. Topics covered in the course will include: persecution and martyrdom, religion and Roman law, political philosophy/theology, and late-ancient historiography. Texts/authors covered in the course will include: Eusebius of Caesarea, Lactantius, Scriptores Historiae Augustae, and various documentary sources (letters, inscriptions, etc.). There are no prerequisites; however, it is recommended that students have taken previous coursework on any aspect of the ancient world, religious studies, or literature.

REL-C 420: M.L. KING JR&MALCLM X AMER REL (30356)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Harriss, Mathew Cooper
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Student Building 138
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

Martin Luther King and Malcolm X were both freedom fighters in the civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 60s. Their respective visions of "freedom" and the means through which such freedom should be achieved, however, proved starkly different-often in unexpected ways. More recently, the religious dimensions of Rev. King and Minister Malcolm have become more obscure in the way both are remembered in popular imagination. This course examines King and Malcolm as American religious thinkers and political activists who drew on their respective religious traditions (Black Baptist Christianity and the Nation of Islam, or the so-called Black Muslims) to generate meaningful resistance to white supremacy in the US and globally.

REL-D 430: PROBLEMS IN SOCIAL ETHICS (15043)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Nietzsche In Religious Imagin
Instructor: Swan Tuite, James Elliott
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: R 4:40 PM — 7:00 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Since his death in 1900, Friedrich Nietzsche has rapidly become one of the most influential and controversial writers in western philosophical and religious thought. And, while most interpreters identify his continuing significance with his critique of the western religious and moral practice, there is little agreement on the substance and methods of his critique. The first part of this course examines the central themes and concepts in Nietzsche's writings (e.g., genealogy, power, nihilism, perspectivism, eternal recurrence, ressentiment, bad conscience, and ascetic ideal) and how these inform his conceptions and critique of religious and moral practice. Primary readings are drawn from Nietzsche's mature works including but not limited to Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, The AntiChrist and selections from his late notebooks. The second part of the course considers how Nietzsche's writings bear on prominent themes in contemporary religious studies including religious imagination, affectivity and moral practice, subjectivity, social life, and critical inquiry.

REL-A 450: TPCS IN THE HIST CHRISTIANITY (30357)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Topic Title: Catholic Controversies
Instructor: Furey, Constance
Course Duration: 1/11/16 — 5/6/16
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 018
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

Catholicism has often been synonymous with controversy. Is Pope Francis radical? Is he transforming the Church? Would it be good if he did? Why do Catholics and non-Catholics alike even care about these questions? In this course we'll study a history that stretches from Martin Luther's critique of the church's corruption to recent controversies surrounding Pope Francis, including debates about marriage, the ordination of women, and the church's response to the sexual abuse crisis. We begin by exploring the place of Catholicism in the modern imagination, with a reading of Graham Greene's classic novel, The Power and the Glory. We then turn to key historical figures and events, including Luther's challenge and the Church's response; an Italian miller's Inquisitorial trial; Teresa of Avila's mystic visions, initially condemned as the work of the devil but later hailed as the visions of a saint; disputes about cultural adaptation and conversion strategies in Catholic missions; a famous debate between pragmatic and radical Catholics in France; and a shocking story about the Church's kidnapping of a Jewish boy in the nineteenth century. The final section of the course will focus on twentieth century controversies, including Liberation Theology and the reception of Vatican II reforms. Background knowledge of Christianity is helpful but not required: the crucial prerequisite is interest in analyzing how religious traditions adapt and change over time, and how a particular tradition (in this case, Catholicism) comes to be defined as "traditional" or "conservative" rather than "modern". Requirements include reading, discussion, several blog postings, and a research paper on a topic to be decided by the student in consultation with the instructor.