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REL-R 102: RELIGION AND POPULAR CULTURE (27456)

arts/humanities

Instructor: TBA
Course Duration: 3/9/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 6:00 PM
Location: Swain West 220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

How do religious ideas and values reflect and shape popular culture? And how does popular culture use religious figures to express its values and anxieties? We will explore these questions through the example of Jesus in ancient and modern cultures. First we will see how the Gospels about Jesus present him in different ways to appeal to ancient people and how the earliest visual images of Jesus reflected ancient ideas about gods and special human beings. We will then look at various depictions of Jesus from the late nineteenth century through the early twentieth century, including novels, movies, art, and drama. The themes here will be changing ideas of masculinity, the anxieties of the Cold War, the rise of the youth culture in the 1960s, and the Culture Wars of the 1990s/2000s. Some of the images of Jesus we will study have been warmly embraced by modern Christians (for example, the film The King of Kings from 1927), while some others have been denounced by Christians as blasphemous (for example, the play Corpus Christi from 1998).

REL-R 133: INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION (23230)

arts/humanities

Instructor: TBA
Course Duration: 3/9/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM — 7:45 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 103
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

What is religion? The word of God? A blueprint of the nature of things? A human response to uncertainty and suffering? A conspiracy of forces known or unknown? A set of universal ideals? This course is a consideration of some of the ideas, figures, and practices evoked by the word religion. We will read scriptures, philosophies, and literatures that challenge us to think through our various assumptions about religion, and, in turn, we will have cause to ponder the terms we use to identify and study it, such as the divine, the sacred, nature, supernaturalism, ritual, spirit, value, God, human being, reality, and the secular.

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30982)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM — 1:10 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 212
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This introductory class explores Islam, Christianity, and Judaism through three major themes: scripture, religion and the state, and gender. It will consider traditional and contemporary issues, such as: What texts do these traditions share, which ones are distinctive to each tradition, and how do religious people read those texts? What do people mean when they talk about Islamic ¿shariah law,¿ whether or not America is a ¿Christian nation,¿ or the modern state of Israel as a ¿Jewish state¿? Why can some Christian ministers marry while others are celibate? Why do some Muslim women cover their heads or faces? Why do men and women sit apart in some synagogues?

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30985)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 212
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (26422)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Chemistry 122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30983)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 212
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30984)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 212
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30987)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Sycamore Hall 212
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (30986)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 212
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 153: RELIGIONS OF ASIA (23231)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: TBA
Course Duration: 3/9/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 6:50 PM — 8:50 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 344
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course will introduce students to the religious traditions of Asia. More specifically it will examine Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto. We will spend much of the semester engaging questions such as, what is religion? How do the adherents of Asian religious traditions talk about their own tradition and the traditions of others? What issues did the authors of Asian religious texts believe to be at stake in the texts they produced? In particular, we will explore the following question from the view of each religious tradition: What kind of world do we live in, and what are human beings to do about this world? After a brief overview we will spend several weeks studying the beliefs and practices of each religious tradition. We will also study in depth one major text from each tradition. All readings are in English. No prior knowledge of Asia or religion is necessary.

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (30991)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 0008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (30993)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 016
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (30992)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM — 1:10 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 337
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (30994)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 016
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (30990)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Ballantine Hall 016
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (30989)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM — 9:55 AM
Location: Ballantine Hall 016
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 160: INTRO TO RELIGION IN AMERICA (30988)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Myers Hall 130
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (30997)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Swan Tuite, James Elliott
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM — 1:10 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (30999)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Swan Tuite, James Elliott
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (27465)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Religion Ethics Public Life
Instructor: Swan Tuite, James Elliott
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Swain East 140
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (30998)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Swan Tuite, James Elliott
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 337
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-A 202: ISS AFRI EURO&WEST ASIAN REL (30676)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Can Christ Be Saved
Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

In its severe attacks against religious belief, the radical French Enlightenment (circa 1750) leveled a devastating critique against the authority of Jesus as the Son of God. Responding to these challenges, successive generations of European theologians and religious thinkers (circa 1770¿1920) tried to make Jesus once again relevant and meaningful to modern audiences. In the process, they, too, abandoned the traditional pillars of Christ¿s authority (such as miracles and prophecy), settling instead on claims about cultural and historical progress, inner religious experience, free choice, even foolishness and personal apocalypse. This course examines these wide-ranging attempts to save Christ and the paradoxes they engendered through a close reading of key texts by Kant, Hegel, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, and other important figures in the history of modern European Christian thought.

REL-A 202: ISS AFRI EURO&WEST ASIAN REL (30682)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Conversion And Transformation
Instructor: Velazquez, Sonia
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM — 7:00 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 317
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

What is a human being? How do we define the boundaries of the self? To what extent is that ¿self¿ stable, and what is required for it to change? In this course we will examine the ways in which humans relate to the realms of the divine, the animal and the inanimate by focusing on the importance of transformational tales in works of mythology, fiction, history and autobiography in writing and the visual arts. In so doing, we will address not only matters of content (i.e., Did the Greeks believe in their myths? Is authenticity important in conversion? Can you trust a renegade? Do hermaphrodites exist? Does gender affect how a religious conversion is narrated?) but also pay attention to the genre and medium of expression of these attempts to imagine ourselves otherwise and the context of their reception. Readings will include: tales of holy harlots, chronicles of the conquest of the Americas, Inquisitional accounts of hermaphroditism, and selections from Hesiod¿s Theogony, Ovid¿s Metamorphoses, Augustine¿s Confessions, Blaise Pascal¿s Penses, among others.

REL-D 202: ISS THEORY, ETHICS&COMPARISONS (33138)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Deadly Vices Chrstin Tradition
Instructor: Swan Tuite, James Elliott
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Deadly vices and behavioral excesses have been a perennial concern in western Christian life due to their self-deceptive, disorienting and destructive tendencies. Traditionally identified as a special class of vices (anger, greed, sloth, pride, lust, envy, and gluttony) or ¿deadly sins¿ that thoroughly undermined human flourishing, these behaviors and their consequences remain central concerns in American life from the rise of addiction medicine and self-help practices to public and private initiatives designed to confront the causes and consequences of these behaviors such as Prohibition, the War on Drugs, and domestic violence intervention programs. The course surveys the origins and continuing significance of the deadly vices in western life from pre-modern conceptions of the eight evil thoughts and seven deadly sins to modern interrogations and re-framing of behavioral excess from individual moral failings to psychiatric conditions and social problems. In addition to theological, philosophical and psychological writings about vice and behavioral excess, this course also draws on representations of vice from literature, art, cinema and popular media.

REL-A 210: INTR OLD TESTAMNT/HEBREW BIBLE (24456)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Mroczek, Eva
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Wendell W. Wright 1120
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

The Hebrew Bible is a foundational text of Western civilization. The goal of this course is to familiarize you with this collection and to understand its development over time in an ancient culture that was radically different from our own. Besides the texts that make up the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, we will also consider non-biblical texts that were written and read in the same period, including writings from the Dead Sea Scrolls, placing them in a broader historical and cultural context of Jewish Antiquity. How were these writings created, interpreted, used, and collected by ancient communities in the formative period that gave birth to Judaism and Christianity? Throughout the course, we will discuss how the texts of the Hebrew Bible have been read and interpreted in very different ways by ancient religious communities and by modern biblical scholars. This approach is meant to encourage reflection on our own reading practices, and to understand how the assumptions we bring to a text, and the context in which we read it, affect the meanings that it comes to make.

REL-B 210: INTRODUCTION TO BUDDHISM (24457)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Nance, Richard F.
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Wendell W. Wright 1120
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to Buddhism, broadly conceived. We will survey the development of Buddhist thought and practice, from its origins in India to its subsequent expansions into other parts of the world. The course has two main aims: to familiarize you with basic Buddhist ideas and practices as these have taken shape in various historical and cultural settings, and to invite you to think critically and carefully about these ideas and practices and what they imply for those who espouse and engage in them. In pursuit of these aims, we will be reading a number of primary sources in translation, together with several additional texts that will help you to contextualize this material. We will be screening several films as well. No previous knowledge of Buddhism is necessary, nor will any be presumed.

REL-R 300: STUDIES IN RELIGION (33099)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: The Trial Of Joan Of Arc
Instructor: Sullivan, Winnifred Fallers
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Joan of Arc was burned at the stake as a heretic in 1429. Almost six hundred years later she continues to fascinate many. Her life and trial raise questions about the relationship of religion and politics, the intersection of church and state, the construction of gender, the law of war, authority and authenticity in matters of personal spiritual experience, religious and psychiatric explanations for her voices, all questions which continue to interest her many many fans. Joan was the object of five trials. The class will focus on the trial of condemnation, setting the trial, the charges, and its aftermath in the context of fifteenth century law and politics as well as considering the later cinematic, literary and political lives of Joan right down to the present.

REL-C 300: ISSUES IN RELIGION IN AMERICAS (27400)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Spirit Possession And Exorcism
Instructor: Selka, Stephen
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM — 7:00 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course is concerned with spirits and their interactions with human beings in the material world. We explore possession and exorcism not simply as oddities on the margins of what is properly religious, but as central to how religion and modernity are defined. During the semester we will tack back and forth between looking at particular practices of possession and exorcism and the wider of these phenomena for understanding religion in our contemporary world. Specific topics include theories of spirit possession, studies of spirit possession practices in the Americas, and the depiction of exorcism in film.

REL-R 300: STUDIES IN RELIGION (30743)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Jewish Critics Of Zionism
Instructor: Magid, Shaul
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: W 5:00 PM — 7:00 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 322
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

In the past fifty years, Zionism has risen to become a central component of Judaism and anti-Zionism has been relegated to those considered the enemy of the State of Israel. Many do not know that some of the most vehement critiques of Zionism came not from the enemies of the state but from Zionists themselves. In this course we will read and examine the Jewish critics of Zionism from the early twentieth century to the present. We will read from the works of Kaufmann Kohler, rector of Hebrew Union College, Martin Buber, Hannah Arendt, Gershom Scholem, Bernard Lazare, Hans Kohn, Simon Rawidowicz, The American Council of Judaism, Yeshayahu Leibowiyz, Jacqueline Rose, Peter Beinart, and Judith Butler. We will also read some of the recent Israeli post-Zionist debates. This course is intended to give the student a much more complex and multifaceted view of Zionism as an idea and as an ostensible solution to the Jewish question.

REL-A 300: STUDIES IN AFRI EUR&WST AS REL (30694)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Israel And Modern Rel Identity
Instructor: Press, Michael David
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 336
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

When we hear the word ¿archaeology,¿ we imagine Indiana Jones digging up the truth about the past. But archaeology and its results are anything but simple truth. This is especially clear with the archaeology of Israel ¿ the Holy Land. Archaeology in Israel has been shaped by a series of agendas: military, nationalist, and above all religious. In turn, archaeology has shaped the identity of different religious groups and how they view their past. This course will survey the history of exploration of the Holy Land, paying special attention to these religious and nationalist interests and goals. How do Christian interests compare with Israeli Jewish ones? What is the role of archaeology in Israeli society? How do American Jews relate to the archaeology of Israel? At the same time, we will also consider the ways in which these interests shape our understanding of the ancient world. Can we remove the effects of these religious lenses to get an ¿objective¿ past?

REL-A 300: STUDIES IN AFRI EUR&WST AS REL (30688)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: The Modern Muslim Experience
Instructor: Jaques, Robert Kevin
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Using topics as diverse as suicide bombing, infidelity, punk rock, and dragons, Muslim authors use novels to explore the complexity of religion in the contemporary world. This course will explore contemporary Muslim religious experiences through fiction written by Muslim authors. By using genres as diverse as science fiction, romance, historical fiction, spy thrillers, and fantasy the course will examine how Muslim authors have used fiction to represent different religious ideas and worldviews in the 20th and 21st centuries. Texts include Naguib Mahfouz, Children of the Alley; Leila Aboulela, Minaret; Orhan Pamuk, My Name is Red; Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner; Yasmina Khadra, The Attack; Monica Ali, Brick Lane: A Novel; Pramoedya Toer, The Girl from the Coast; Mohsin Hamid, The Reluctant Fundamentalist; and Michael Muhammad Knight, Osama Van Halen. Requirements: Attendance is mandatory, weekly book reviews, in-class discussion, and a final research-length paper.

REL-A 321: PAUL&HIS INFLUENCE EARLY CHRST (30700)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 105
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

Paul of Tarsus is the most important human figure in the history of Christianity. This course investigates the man and the myth through a historical study of Paul¿s own letters and the later writings about him. We begin with a survey of Paul¿s letters, turn to the social and cultural history of Pauline congregations, and then look at Paul¿s ancient and modern legacy. Topics include Paul¿s moral teaching, including areas of controversy.

REL-C 330: EVANGELICAL AMERICA (27420)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

From the Great Awakening to the 2012 presidential campaigns, evangelicals¿and in the last century Pentecostal and Charismatic movements within evangelicalism¿have played a critical role in shaping American cultural, social, and political institutions. Who are evangelicals? What do they believe, and how do they behave? Should non-evangelicals be worried about them? This course explores the causes, nature, and implications of evangelical influence through the lenses of history, literature, and religious and cultural studies. Assignments and classroom activities incorporate a wide variety of cultural artifacts, including fiction, poetry, autobiography, music, television, film, ethnography, and food. The course is organized thematically and chronologically. Topics include: religious revivals and reform; separation of church and state; race and gender; Billy Graham; science, evolution, creationism, and Intelligent Design; Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity; hymns, Contemporary Christian Music, and Holy Hip Hop; politics; Catholicism; mass media and megachurches; apocalypticism; and globalization. We will read two novels: Charles Sheldon¿s In His Steps (1896) [the inspiration for WWJD: ¿What Would Jesus Do?¿] and Tim F. LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins¿s Left Behind (1995). Undergraduates will write two short papers, and essay-style midterm and final exams.

REL-B 335: BOLLYWOOD AND BEYOND (30717)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Manring, Rebecca
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: R 2:30 PM — 5:00 PM
Location: Kirkwood Hall 212
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

The course gives students a nice introduction to cinema in the Indian subcontinent using a theoretical framework for understanding the ways religion plays out in both popular and less commercial films. Each week we will watch and discuss, in detail, one film. Our broad topics include partition, gender, myth, fundamentalism, and the diaspora. We will come to know a range of views on religion and its role in the lives of South Asians through film produced in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, our classroom discussions, and our reading of critical articles for each film. The films include mythologicals, social commentary, and Bollywood blockbusters, all of which have a great deal to tell us about religion, and life in general, in South Asia. No prerequisites or prior knowledge of South Asia needed.

REL-C 335: NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS (30728)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Harriss, Mathew Cooper
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM — 7:00 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H DUS

This course compares the emergence, reception, and history of Mormon and Nation of Islam belief and practice as new religious movements that were ¿made in the USA¿ during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By exploring a series of common religious and cultural elements, we will consider what draws people to new religions, why they rise and fall in popularity, what they reflect about the American societies and cultures in which they emerge, and how they are viewed and, at times, repressed by the broader society.

REL-D 350: RELIGION, ETHICS & ENVIRONMENT (30734)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Sideris, Lisa H
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Ballantine Hall 209
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course is built upon an examination of the relationship of humans to the rest of the natural world and its inhabitants. The course surveys various religious and secular/philosophical schools of thought in environmental ethics (e.g. ecotheology and nature religions, ecofeminism, ¿land ethics,¿ animals rights and liberation, science-based approaches, etc). Topics concerning ethics and the environment may include: instrumental and intrinsic value in nature and animals; anthropocentrism; individualistic versus holistic ethics; ecological and evolutionary science; obligations to future generations; population; climate change and energy depletion; diminishing species; environmental justice, economics and sustainability. This class will explore dilemmas associated with these issues, and will provide a forum for students to understand, articulate, and defend their own personal environmental worldviews.

REL-A 355: ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY (30705)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Sycamore Hall 108
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course offers an in-depth study of modern Orthodox Christianity, the second largest Christian denomination in the world. Students will explore the various experiences of Orthodox believers, and the ways they interprete those experiences, in the context of religious rivalry, war, revolution, and oppression. Here we will see a faith community confront Antichrist and atheists, heretics and heathens, radicals and revolutionaries, all in an effort to defeat the ¿synagogue of Satan¿ and realize the Kingdom of God.

REL-B 374: EARLY CHINESE THOUGHT (30721)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course provides an introduction to the early development of Chinese thought, from the oracle bone divination of the Shang Dynasty to the religious, ethical, and political theories of classical Confucianism, Mohism, and Daoism, through the unification of China in 221 BCE. We will concentrate on early debates over human nature and the best practices of self-cultivation, the general nature of the cosmos and the human role in it, and the proper ordering of society. The different positions articulated by these early Chinese figures greatly influenced later Chinese intellectual and social history, including the development of Buddhism, and influenced developments in Japan, Korea, and Vietnam as well. Thus, understanding these early debates is an important stepping-stone for understanding East Asian thought and culture generally. No knowledge of classical Chinese is required. Readings are in English translation.

REL-R 389: MAJORS SEMINAR IN RELIGION (24458)

intensive writing

Topic Title: Space Place Gender Justice
Instructor: Blair, Heather Elizabeth
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Lindley Hall 019
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): IW

This course invites students to put theory and method to work in their own study of religion, and focuses on what some have called "the spatial turn" in the humanities and social sciences. Over the course of the semester, students will develop answers to questions such as the following: how does religious activity shape the places we inhabit and move through? What happens when people are forcibly dislodged from their places, or when they voluntarily move, migrate, or go on pilgrimage? Who has the right to identify, define, and control access to sacred places, and why? This course is intended for Religious Studies majors and carries intensive writing credit. Class materials range widely: we will read essays and memoirs, academic articles, and at least one novel. We will also listen to songs, watch films, and go on site visits. Course requirements include regular participation in class discussion (and by extension regular attendance), an independent project resulting in a final paper approximately 12 pages in length, and several shorter writing assignments. Students will also need to engage in cooperative work with small groups of their peers.

REL-C 401: TOPICS IN AMERICAN REL HISTORY (24460)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Amer Religious Histori Fiction
Instructor: Harriss, Mathew Cooper
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Sycamore Hall 103
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

What is the relationship between fictional and historical narrative? Why do fiction writers work in historical modes? Why do historians frequently turn to fiction as primary sources? Why have literary critics become historians? How does the modifier ¿religious¿ change our expectations about fiction and/or history? How do we negotiate competing truth claims among religion, history, and fiction? What standards should we invoke in our reading and assessment of works of fiction as sources and statements, stories and insights, and what happens when we find religious, historical, and literary standards at odds with one another? This course takes up these religious, literary, and historical questions (and more) with a specific focus on the issue of slavery in American narrative fiction. Selected historical and theoretical readings will supplement close engagement with slave narratives and The Book of Mormon¿along with novels by Stowe, Eastman, Twain, Styron, Haley, and McBride.

REL-D 410: TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT (32095)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Religion And The Economy
Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 006
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Many great thinkers have theorized the relationship between religion and the economy. Karl Marx, for instance, approached religion as an institution of social control that is shaped by material realities. Max Weber, in contrast, treated religion and economy as independent variables. He observed an affinity between Protestantism and capitalism, though regarded some other religions like Islam to be incompatible with profit-making. This course builds on these foundational theories and explores the intersections and frictions between religion and the economy. We will examine how religious believers navigate between competing ideas about licit and illicit profit, wealth and charity, and accounting and accountability. We will also consider forms of economy beyond secular capitalism and examine practices like the burning of paper money in Chinese religion and how it establishes relations of exchange between the living and the dead. Mass production and consumption of religious commodities will be another central concern. We will devote significant attention to contemporary neoliberalism as we consider, for example, the implications of assigning religious rights to corporations, and whether investing in the stock market is like an act of religiosity requiring trust in the unknown.

REL-D 430: PROBLEMS IN SOCIAL ETHICS (30737)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Psychiatric Ethics
Instructor: Swan Tuite, James Elliott
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Ethical issues are generally under theorized within psychiatric spaces. When psychiatric practices are subjected to ethical examination, the analysis is frequently uneven; i.e., there tends to be much more consideration of ¿hard cases¿ (e.g., involuntary commitments) than more common ethical dilemmas associated with psychiatric practice such as physician-patient relations. While many observers suggest that with the de-stigmatization of mental illness in western life many of the ethical issues in psychiatric care will be resolved through the application of standard ethical models, others argue that the concerns raised by psychiatry call for a re-examination of these standard ethical models. This course begins with a survey of practical ethical problems raised by psychiatric practice before turning to efforts to re-think the norms and safeguards within psychiatric practice. Likely topics include but not limited to (1) informed consent and decisional-impairment, (2) cognitive rehabilitative therapies and belief-formation, (3) privacy and duty to protect, (4) just distribution of psychiatric services, (5) pharmacological intervention/enhancement debates, (6) psychiatric care for children, and, finally, (7) psychiatric classification, race and gender. Readings are interdisciplinary but emphasize the contributions of religious studies scholarship especially religious ethics to the growing literature in psychiatric ethics.

REL-A 430: TOPICS IN THE HIST OF JUDAISM (30709)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Bible And Beyond
Instructor: Mroczek, Eva
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: M 3:35 PM — 6:05 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 205
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

The biblical story of King David is like a blockbuster movie, complete with sex, lies, murder, betrayal, and a dysfunctional family. But in Jewish tradition, King David also became a singer of Psalms, a prophet, a perfect model for living, and finally an angelic heavenly being. How did this happen? Why was this character so exciting for ancient readers, and why does he still capture our imagination? In this class, we explore the biblical stories about King David and their afterlife in later literature, from the Dead Sea Scrolls through Rabbinic and mystical texts. We will discuss the emergence of biblical texts and explore their shifting meanings for communities of readers over time, including our own modern context. The class requires some reading knowledge of Hebrew, as we will read some passages together in the original, but your Hebrew doesn¿t have to be great. The course will take different reading levels into account.

REL-A 440: JUDAISM AND GENDER (30713)

intensive writing arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 1/12/15 — 5/8/15
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 006
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): IW A&H GCC

This course engages Jewish tradition from its canonical texts to present-day issues. We will explore how Jewish traditions see the differences between men and women. How have different Jewish communities interpreted the Hebrew Bible and other Jewish texts when they make statements about women? How do Jewish communities of today approach gendered issues such as sex, marriage, dress, public and private spheres, and women in leadership?