Undergraduate Courses

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REL-R 102: RELIGION AND POPULAR CULTURE (14590)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Selka, Stephen
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 4:40 PM — 5:30 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 135
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 102: RELIGION AND POPULAR CULTURE (14588)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Selka, Stephen
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 135
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 102: RELIGION AND POPULAR CULTURE (12564)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Selka, Stephen
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM — 6:35 PM
Location: Student Building 150
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 102: RELIGION AND POPULAR CULTURE (14589)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Selka, Stephen
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 135
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 133: INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION (11496)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (28251)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Woodburn Hall 008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (28255)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (28252)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 217
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (28253)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM — 1:10 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (28250)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Myers Hall 130
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (28254)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 152: JEWS, CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS (28256)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Imhoff, Sarah
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (28305)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Sideris, Lisa H
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Hutton Honors College 217
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (28307)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Sideris, Lisa H
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 3:35 PM — 4:25 PM
Location: Hutton Honors College 217
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (28302)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Sideris, Lisa H
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Hutton Honors College 217
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (28303)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Sideris, Lisa H
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM — 12:05 PM
Location: Hutton Honors College 217
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (28301)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Sideris, Lisa H
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 10:10 AM — 11:00 AM
Location: Jordan Hall A100
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (28304)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Sideris, Lisa H
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM — 1:10 PM
Location: Hutton Honors College 217
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-R 170: RELIGION, ETHICS & PUBLIC LIFE (28306)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Sideris, Lisa H
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM — 3:20 PM
Location: Hutton Honors College 217
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-B 210: INTRODUCTION TO BUDDHISM (9892)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Nance, Richard F.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Wendell W. Wright 1120
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to Buddhism, broadly conceived. We will survey the development of Buddhist thought and practice, from its origins in India to its subsequent expansions into other parts of the world. The course has two main aims: to familiarize you with basic Buddhist ideas and practices as these have taken shape in various historical and cultural settings, and to invite you to think critically and carefully about these ideas and practices and what they imply for those who espouse and engage in them. In pursuit of these aims, we will be reading a number of primary sources in translation, together with several additional texts that will help you to contextualize this material. We will be screening several films as well. No previous knowledge of Buddhism is necessary, nor will any be presumed.

REL-A 250: INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIANITY (10685)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM — 7:00 PM
Location: Swain West 119
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course will teach you new things about a familiar religion. Nearly two billion people around the world today describe themselves as Christians, including a majority of people in the U.S. So most people believe they have at least a basic knowledge of Christianity. But Christianity is in fact bewilderingly diverse. We may be able to agree on a simple definition: Christianity is the religion of people who believe in the gospel that Jesus Christ is the savior of the world. But what does it mean to "believe in"? What is the gospel? How is salvation achieved? Does God care only about "saving souls" or also about healing bodies from diseases? What is the kingdom of heaven? What should believers do in this world? Over two thousand years of history, in diverse cultures, Christians have answered these questions in an amazing variety of ways. Christianity, in other words, is not really a single, unchanging religion but instead an ever-changing network of related practices and beliefs. We will trace the fascinating, often controversial, history of Christianity from Jesus and his followers' healings and exorcisms in the first century up through the global expansion of Christianity in the modern world. More broadly, we will gain an understanding of the diversity of world cultures, both within the U.S. and around the globe, and we will gain skills in interacting with human diversity in culturally informed and sensitive ways.

REL-A 270: INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM (28273)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Jaques, Robert Kevin
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Woodburn Hall 120
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This is an introductory course to the study of Islam designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of the religion. The course begins with the historical emergence of Islam at around the seventh century AD, and concludes with the various forms that Islam has taken in the contemporary era. In-between these bookends, we will read about how Muslims have sought to put into practice the word of God and the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad by configuring and transforming various aspects of social life such as personal piety, education, law, gender relations, and so on. Apart from identifying the core beliefs and cultural practices that have defined Islam, we will also look at issues that have sparked unceasing debate and disagreement between Muslims. Some of the major theoretical concepts that will recur in our discussions include authority, interpretation, tradition, and representation.

REL-C 300: ISSUES IN RELIGION IN AMERICAS (28286)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Post-apocalyptic Fiction
Instructor: Selka, Stephen
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Focusing on literature and film, this course explores post-apocalyptic narratives as a form of speculative fiction that provides an imaginative way of reflecting on questions about human nature, good versus evil, predestination, mortality, and spirituality. The course also considers how post-apocalyptic narratives work as prophecy, or as a way of critiquing society and of telling cautionary tales to contemporary audiences. Although scripture and doctrine are not the main focus, the course addresses how post-apocalyptic fiction intersects with and diverges from explicitly religious teachings about the end of the world as we know it.

REL-B 310: EAST ASIAN BUDDHISM (28284)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Blair, Heather Elizabeth
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

REL-B 330: WOMEN IN SOUTH ASIAN REL TRADS (28274)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Manring, Rebecca
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

What do South Asian religions tell us about what it means to be a woman? We will explore women's lives through text, film, and narrative literature with four different perspectives in mind: 1. Descriptive: women's own voices and their contributions to the shaping of the various traditions we will study. 2. Critical: women's subordination, marginalization, and invisibility in religious history. 3. Comparative: how do women in South Asia handle issues, for example, of purity and pollution? 4. Methodological: how can we locate the gendered experience of religion? In other words, in a field once dominated by philology, how have some scholars managed to shift their emphasis to hear the voices that have rarely been recorded, the voices of women?

REL-R 332: TPCS IN MOD CHRISTIAN THOUGHT (28292)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Dilemma Of The Modern Jesus
Instructor: Michelson, Patrick Lally
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Student Building 131
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Confronted by an array of challenges to the traditional foundations of Jesus' authority-an authority based on miracles, prophecy, and the second coming-Christian thinkers and theologians, as well as atheists, sought to make Jesus accessible and meaningful to a modern audience. This project to make Jesus modern resulted in an array of different descriptions of Jesus. He became a role model, a rational thinker, a paradox opposed to Christendom, a psychologist of "glad tidings," a symbol of heightened human consciousness, a failed apocalyptic prophet, and the God that could never be known. Unmoored from the stability of church doctrine and conventional interpretations of the Bible, this modern Jesus generated as many theological problems as it solved.

REL-D 350: RELIGION, ETHICS & ENVIRONMENT (33794)

arts/humanities

Instructor: Sideris, Lisa H
Course Duration: 10/17/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-C 350: ISLAM IN AMERICA (32130)

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Course Duration: 10/17/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM — 8:15 PM
Location: Swain West 219
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): S&H DUS

This course examines a particular aspect of the Muslim experience in America, the anti-Muslim discourse that has come to be known as Islamophobia. We will investigate the historical emergence of this phenomenon, tracing its connections to Orientalist beliefs associated with European colonization, the "Clash of Civilizations" thesis that became popular in the 1990s, and the post-9/11 War on Terror. Much of our readings will focus on the everyday experiences of American Muslims and their hopes and fears, paying attention to how the governance of these domestic brown bodies are intimately connected to the American empire's governance of brown bodies elsewhere. We will be actively engaging with media representations of Muslims, and especially since this is an election year, pay careful attention to the discourses about Muslims promoted by our presidential candidates.

REL-D 370: TOPICS IN GENDER&WESTERN REL (28291)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Sexuality And Gender
Instructor: Schott, Jeremy M
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM — 3:45 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 103
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

This course considers discourses on the body, sexuality, and the construction of gender among Christians, Jews, philosophers, and others in the 1st-8th centuries CE. The course will also consider the import of these discourses and our analyses of them for contemporary thinking about the body, gender, and sexuality. Readings will include saint's lives, medical treatises, philosophical texts, biblical texts, mythological texts, and midrashim.

REL-B 374: EARLY CHINESE THOUGHT (32118)

arts/humanities global civ/cultures

Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Ballantine Hall 005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H GCC

This course provides an introduction to the early development of Chinese thought, from the oracle bone divination of the Shang Dynasty to the religious, ethical, and political theories of classical Confucianism, Mohism, and Daoism, through the unification of China in 221 BCE. We will concentrate on early debates over human nature and the best practices of self-cultivation, the general nature of the cosmos and the human role in it, and the proper ordering of society. The different positions articulated by these early Chinese figures greatly influenced later Chinese intellectual and social history, including the development of Buddhism, and influenced developments in Japan, Korea, and Vietnam as well. Thus, understanding these early debates is an important stepping-stone for understanding East Asian thought and culture generally. No knowledge of classical Chinese is required. Readings are in English translation.

REL-D 380: COMPARATIVE STY REL PHENOMENA (13819)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: The Problem With Poop
Instructor: Jaques, Robert Kevin
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM — 10:45 AM
Location: Lindley Hall 030
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

To be human is to poop. Bodily functions such as defecation and urination, bleeding, and even death have always presented problems for religious thinkers and practitioners. For instance, when a religious person says that humans are "made in God's image," what does this mean? Is God physical or are such statements purely metaphorical? For those who hold to some construction of God as physical, how far does the physical similarity to the human go? It may surprise many to learn that in many religious traditions the problems posed by the idea of a defecating God are used to explore the very meaning of humanity, divinity, and the relationship between the two. The most common frame through which these issues have been examined is purity but this does not capture the full range of challenges that regular bodily functions raise in religious thought and practice. This course will provide a cross-cultural comparative examination of bodily functions that examine purity, but perhaps more importantly, issues of shame, bodily discipline, evil, and definitions of the human-divine relationship that are central to basic human functions such as defecation, urination, blood, and death. Requirements: Attendance, a final research length paper, and weekly reading analyses.

REL-R 389: MAJORS SEMINAR IN RELIGION (13846)

intensive writing

Topic Title: Boundaries
Instructor: Nance, Richard F.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Sycamore Hall 224
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): IW

This class will investigate some of the myriad ways in which religious practitioners and scholars work to create, enforce, dwell within, rationalize, challenge, transgress, and transcend boundaries of various kinds. To draw a boundary is to herald a difference, and students will be encouraged to explore these putative differences and the differences they make in the lives of religious adherents and those who would responsibly study them. Boundaries to be taken up will include-among others-those that have been drawn between scholars and practitioners, insiders and outsiders, the sacred and the profane, the pure and the impure, the formed and the formless, the visible and the invisible, the rational and the irrational, the possible and the impossible, the knowable and the unknowable, the human and the non-human, the sick and the healthy, and selves and others. This course is open only to majors in Religious Studies.

REL-C 402: RELIGION, ILLNESS, AND HEALING (13304)

intensive writing arts/humanities

Instructor: Brown, Candy Gunther
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM — 12:30 PM
Location: Lindley Hall 030
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): IW A&H DUS

Is illness good or evil? Can religion be good or bad for your health? How should healthcare providers and administrators respond to the religious beliefs of patients and their families? What ethical and legal questions arise when spiritual healing is integrated with (or replaces) conventional healthcare? Does inclusion of spiritual healing in public schools violate the establishment clause of the First Amendment to the Constitution? Does commercialization of spiritual healing make the practices less authentic-or less religious? This course will explore these and other questions surrounding religion, illness, and healing in America. We will emphasize Christian beliefs and practices (e.g. valorization of suffering or prayer for divine healing) and forms of complementary and alternative medicine connected with religious traditions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, or Western metaphysical spirituality (e.g. yoga, martial arts, mindfulness meditation, acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy, Reiki, Therapeutic Touch, and anticancer diets).

REL-A 430: TOPICS IN THE HIST OF JUDAISM (28293)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Std Amer Judtheol Cltr Pers
Instructor: Magid, Shaul
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM — 5:15 PM
Location: Cedar Hall C107
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

REL-D 430: PROBLEMS IN SOCIAL ETHICS (32125)

arts/humanities

Topic Title: Self-cultispiritual Exercise
Instructor: Stalnaker, Aaron Dean
Course Duration: 8/22/16 — 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM — 2:15 PM
Location: Ballantine Hall 217
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirement(s): A&H

Can anyone ever really change who they are? Religions tend to answer this question with an emphatic yes. And it does seem that religions can transform people: some believers even become selfless servants of the poor, or suicide bombers. But how and why might this happen? Similar circumstances push people in quite different ways; "good intentions" alone are not sufficient for real conversion to some difficult new form of life. This class focuses on how religious commitments are conceived, articulated, and nurtured through methodical practices that give followers specific direction, guiding them through alternative territories of sin and salvation, ignorance and wisdom, or suffering and bliss. Examining practices of personal formation sheds new light on the broader question of how flawed and frail human beings can actually become good, and perhaps even heroic, sagely, or saintly. It also provides a unique window into the psychosocial mechanisms of religious power. All readings will be in English or English translation. The course fulfills the Intensive Writing requirement, and includes a final research project and paper on the course theme.

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Other courses of interest

CEUS-R 312 Shrine and Pilgrimage in Central Asian Islam

Instructor: DeWeese, D.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: M 2:30p-5:00p
Credit Hours: 3

Surveys religious beliefs and activities involving shrines and pilgrimage to holy places in Muslim Central Asia, from beginning to present. Broadens understanding of how shrines served the religious needs of Central Asian Muslims and the relationship between shrine-centered religious life and "normative" religious practice.

COLL-P 155 PUBLIC ORAL COMUNICATION

Instructor: Bartzel, J.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 1:25p-2:15p or 2:30p-3:20p
Credit Hours: 3

Above class is for students interested in Religious Studies

Prepares students in the liberal arts to communicate effectively with public audiences. Emphasizes oral communication as practiced in public contexts: how to advance reasoned claims in public; how to adapt public oral presentations to particular audiences; how to listen to, interpret, and evaluate public discourse; and how to formulate a clear response.

COLL-C103 Original Sin: Religion and Psychology

Instructor: Furey, C.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 12:2p-1:10p
Credit Hours: 3

The doctrine of Original Sin--the claim that humans don't have free will--has infuriated and intrigued people since it was first articulated by the fourth century Christian bishop, Augustine of Hippo. This theory of human nature suggests that we are captive to impulses beyond our control. Many Christian movements have rejected Augustine's interpretation of the origin story in Genesis, and many secular and religious thinkers alike have offered alternative--and more optimistic--theories of human nature. But Original Sin remains one of the most powerful religious versions of a view shared by many secular and scientific thinkers; that humans cannot freely choose to resist selfish or violent impulses. "Original Sin" traces the enduring influence of this idea by exploring how it has been variously conceived, defended, and challenged. This course serves as an introduction to the study of religions as well as a comparative exploration of religion and psychology. Assignments will include short reading responses, several blog postings, an investigation essay on a topic of your choice, and a take-home final exam.

COLL-C103 Work Hard, Pray Hard

Instructor: Velazquez, S.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: MW 11:15a-12:05p
Credit Hours: 3

No one, not even God, is free from the tolls of labor. And yet, from the Christian Garden of Eden to the Greco-Roman ideal of the Golden Age, human imaginings of perfect happiness emphasize a utopic world where human survival is assured and not dependent on our toils and troubles. Indeed, having to work for one's sustenance ("to eat by the sweat of our brow" Gen 3:19) and to reproduce through painful labor are depicted as divine punishments for human disobedience. And yet, parallel to this punitive vision of work, Christianity also developed an ethos of liberating labor through the institution of monastic orders that exalted manual crafts and meditative practices as a means of salvation. In this class we will examine on the one hand, this twin legacy of labor as punishment and as salvation as it appears in artistic, religious, political and philosophical texts and contexts, and on the other, we will explore the "others" of work (boredom, idleness, leisure). We will consider questions such as: to what extent is our humanity linked to our capacity for work; are we homo sapiens ("knowing men") or homo laborans ("working men")? Is labor gendered? Must labor be productive and produce a profit or can there be leisurely labor? Can labor heal? Why do we call artistic creations works of art? How do ideas of labor as punishment and labor as creation affect the social acceptance of art and artists?

COLL-C103 Power, Politics, and Piety

Instructor: Magid, S.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 12:20p1:10p
Credit Hours: 3

pThis course will examine the political situation in Israel/Palestine from historical, theological, and cultural perspectives with special emphasis given to questions of nationalism and territorialism. We will read primary and secondary literature dealing with modern nationalism and territory, the concept of "land" in Judaism and Islam (using primary sources in translation), the history of Zionism and Palestinian Nationalism, the rise of the anti-nationalist Islamist movement including its roots in British colonialism. We will explore the rise of nationalism in the Middle East more generally including its secular, Marxist, and Islamist roots and will read some classical and contemporary Zionist debates on bi-nationalism, militarism and territorial compromise, and the more contemporary discussion in Israel and Palestine in the media and in the academy. This is not a political science course--meaning we will not debate policy, legislation, and predictions for the future. Rather, we will examine the underlying theological and cultural roots of the political crisis founded on the relationship between territory and national identity. At the end of the semester we will turn to some political commentary on issues of territory and resolution including the Israeli Declaration of Independence, Camp David II, the Hamas Charter, the Geneva Accords, and the Saudi Arabia Peace Plan.

JSTU-J 251 Jewish History: the Bible to Spanish Expulsion

Instructor: Gonzalez Dieguez, G.
Course Duration: 8/22/16 - 12/16/16
Day & Time: TR 2:30p-3:45p
Credit Hours: 3

This course introduces students to various aspects of Judaism from the Biblical Era to the Middle Ages. Key historical events to be studied include the origins of the ancient Israelites; the composition of the Hebrew Bible; the destruction of the Second Temple; the Jewish encounter with Hellenism; the rise of the Rabbis and Rabbinic Literature; symbiosis and conflict between Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Europe; and the Spanish Expulsion. As we work our way through these major stages of Jewish history, we also pay close attention to the formation of religious ideas and practices that characterize Jewish life in each period, such as monotheism, covenant, Torah, temple, liturgy, mysticism, and diaspora. Course readings incorporate a large selection of primary texts in translation alongside secondary literature from various introductory-level books. Assignments include exams and short research papers.

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