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(Re)embracing Diversity

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Recommended because it focuses on understanding the culture of Muslim communities living in the US and abroad. The methods are well thought out, and the substantive knowledge in the hand-outs work to enhance cultural understanding rather than focusing on knowledge acquisition only. Start by perusing the instructors guide.

20 Years after the Hostages: Declassified Document on Iran and the United States

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its primary resources and information on US-Iran relations. Topics and materials include an article on US-Iran relations with 6 primary resources documents. Document titles include Document 1: “Developments in the Azerbaijan Situation,” Central Intelligence Group, Office of Reports and Estimates; Document 2: Memorandum for the President, Memorandum from the Department of State, top secret, circa August 1953; Document 3: “Follow-up on the President?s Talk with the Shah of Iran,” secret, July 25, 1972; Document 4: Shredded CIA Cable reporting on information provided by an Iranian contact, secret, September 1,1979. Be aware of the fact that due to the age and scan quality of the documents, some may be difficult to read. Excellent primary source from our government on U.S. policy in the region. This resource originally recommended by Harvard University. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

A 16th Century Mosque

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on the Middle East in the 16th century. Topics and materials: Attractively illustrated book that examines the Suleiymaniye mosque in Istanbul, focusing on its cultural, religious and social significance. The book includes good introductions to Islam, the Ottoman Empire, and the culture and technology of the sixteenth century. Recommended for elementary and middle school students. Available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware of the fact that you will need to follow the Outreach link to the Print Materials link to access information. Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Fiona Macdonald and Mark Bergin

Media Type: Book

A Century of Islam in America(1987)

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Recommended because The Middle East Institute Islamic Affairs Programs. Occasional Paper No. 4.

Citation: Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck. Washington DC:

Media Type: Book

A Common Ground … Where Three Religions Come Together (1987, 21 minutes)

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Recommended because of its discussion of the three Abrahamic religions. Using the holy city of Jerusalem as a stage, this presentation explores some of the commonalties and differences of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, three great religions that have their roots in Southwest Asia. Examining the sacred texts of each, the film compares without judgment central issues such as divine revelation, transcendence, profession of faith, the relationship of man to God, the significance of laws and teachings, and beliefs about the reign of God and final judgment. The film incorporates useful historical maps, religious architecture, and many scenes from the city of Jerusalem. This is a fair comparison of beliefs and practices that does not concentrate so much on the history of contact between the religions as on their individual structures and practices. [AGF] Produced by David Nalle for the Islamic Affairs Program of the Middle East Institute. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU, also available through the University of Utah. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

A History of Israel: From the Rise of Zionism to Our Time (1996)

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Recommended because this is a detailed account of the history of Israel since the British mandate of 1948. Sachar is detailed without making the topics and issues complicated. One of the most useful and informative chapters is the first, entitled ‘The Rise of Jewish Nationalism.’ Recommended for use in grades 9-12 in the classroom as a history textbook. It is also strongly recommended as summer reading for middle and high school social studies teachers. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 06/2002.

Citation: Sachar, Howard.

Media Type: Book

A History of Russian Literature (1994)

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Recommended because Recommended as a standard reference work written by a leading scholar. The book is a survey of Russian literature from its beginnings in the eleventh century to modern times. The author places the development of Russian literature in the context of Russian social and political developments and religious and philosophic thought. The literature covered includes early folklore, the medieval literatures, the dissident and emigre writing after the revolution, and the realist fiction of Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy, to the dissident literary movement that followed Stalin`s death. Availability; apparently out of print. Reviewed by Bill Wolf, May 2002; updated August 2003.

Citation: Victor Terras, Yale University Press

Media Type: Book

A History of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (1994)

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Recommended because , more consistently than any English-language predecessor, Mr. Tessler takes it as given that the struggle between Zionist Jews and Palestinian Arabs fora room of their own in the same small territory has always been, and has again become, the core of the rivalry. He then elaborates the dissonant counterpoint of political aspirations, cultural outlook and above all historical experience that have made that struggle a persisting, if asymmetrical, tragedy for both peoples. As the story nears the present, Mr. Tessler’s pursuit of comprehensiveness leads to a loss of thematic forest in the leaves of narrative detail. Still, the dry stretches are outweighed by exemplary chapters on the formation of dissimilar and antagonistic national identities; the growing irreconcilability of two peoples living adjacently, but not together, under British administration, and the big bang of 1948 that brought Israelis independence and Palestinians a national disaster, as well as some three-quarters of a million refugees. Reviewed by David Schoenbaum, the New York Times Book Review.

Citation: Tessler, Mark.

Media Type: Book

A is for Arabia (forthcoming)

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Recommended because it guides readers through Arabia in a charming alphabet rhyme. Expressive full colour illustrations complement the witty lines of each rhyme. From visiting a souq filled with sacks of spices to climbing up a high jebel with Jameela, readers are taken on an exciting journey through the land, as they meet its people and are introduced to its customs. Suitable as a reading book for ages 7-10, or as a picture book for younger children, the rhymes and illustrations in A is for Arabia will delight and fascinate children from all parts of the world. Reviewed by Stacey International, 04/2003.

Citation: Johnson, Julia and illustrated by Emily Styles.

Media Type: Book

A Kurdish Family

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Recommended because of its description of a Kurdish family. It describes the journey of a Kurdish family who immigrates from their home in Iraq to California, their life in Iraq, and their new life in California. Recommended for middle and lower high school students. Available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware you will need to follow the Outreach link to the Print Materials link to access information. Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Karen O’Connor. 56 pages (Texas)

Media Type: Book

A Life Like Mine

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, March 3, 2010

A Life Like Mine tells the story of how children live around the world through four themes:  survival, development, protection, participation.  Excellent images and text suitable for upper elementary and middle school students. Truly has a global perspective. Includes many visuals and maps.

Is is published by UNICEF.

Media Type: Book

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A Medieval Banquet in the Alhambra Palace (1991)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its teacher resources on the Muslim Era. Topics and materials: A packet compiling both teacher’s resources, handouts and slides detailing the Alhambra, the Muslim-era fortress in Granada, Spain, as a centerpiece for discussing Islamic culture and presence in Spain from the 700s AD to 1492. Recommended for middle and high school students. It is available to be purchased at http://www.awaironline.org/. There is information at AWAIR on a teacher workshop to enable you to learn more about the simulation part of this workbook. Also available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Audrey Shabbas. AWAIR. 180 pages.

Media Type: Book

A Treasury of Turkish Folktales for Children (1988) (Turkish)

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Recommended because the book contains the retelling of many Turkish folktale classics. The thirty-four stories contained in this book are excellent for elementary and middle school teachers to use in a World literature or World cultures curriculum unit. Perfect for story time or for classroom reading practice. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Citation: Walker, Barbara.

Media Type: Book

A Veiled Revolution (1982, 26 minutes)(NYU)

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Recommended because of its focus on understanding Middle East women and the veil. This video is an excellent vehicle to help Western audiences see beyond stereotyped notions about women and veiling in the Middle East, and is especially useful in light of recent developments in Egypt. The film interviews Egyptian women who have chosen and not chosen “lawful dress,” and illustrates different interpretations and types of covering among women who wear it. Film examines both the realities and misperceptions of this tradition, correctly describing it as a newer, adapted mode of dressing, rather than “a return to the veil.” Women interviewed come from many walks of life — some in the workplace, some not — and include others who don’t wear the veil. Fernea again provides a useful study guide with good background information for the instructor. [AGF] Recommended for middle and high school students.Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU and to North Pacific and Upper Midwest States through the University of Washington. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) *Study guide available with video. Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

A World Between: Poems, Stories, and Essays by Iranian-Americans (1998) (Persian)

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Recommended because This passionate collection of poems, short stories, and essays is the first published anthology of writings by Iranian immigrants as well as first generation Iranian-Americans. Wide-ranging and deeply personal, these pieces explore the Iranian community’s continuing struggle to understand what it means to be Iranian in America. Many of the selections are intimate reflections on the pain of being alienated from the language, history, and geography of one’s childhood and fondest memories. Other pieces grapple with the complexities and ambiguities of cultural and personal identity, particularly for first generation Iranian-Americans. The contributors arrived in the United States as exiles and refugees of the 1979 Iranian Revolution; others are immigrants who left their homeland for non-political reasons. Reviewed by Publisher.

Citation: Karim, Persis.

Media Type: Book

AATT Homepage

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because its information of the teaching of the Turkish language. Here you can find information on Turkish Summer Programs, Grant Opportunities, Resources, etc. Be aware of the fact that this resource is more suitable for those teaching or who want to learn the Turkish language. Also, the resources link is currently being updated.

Abaden.net

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Recommended because of its Iranian cultural resources. Topics and materials include Abadan, picture gallery, joke archive, discussion, music, chat room, food recipes, newspapers, sports, TV, radio, and Iranian links. I recommend the Abadan link. Here you will find a brief on Abadan including history & a map, Abadan poems and dictionary. The Memory and Tales of Abadan sections give personal touch and cultural history to the region. This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

ABC: Teaching Human Rights. Practical Activities for Primary and Secondary Schools. (1990).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides basic information for teachers in primary and secondary schools who want to foster awareness and knowledge of human rights and the sense of reciprocity and universality upon which it is based and some practical activities. Please be aware that the entire book can be read online at http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu6/2/abc.htm#II. Be aware of the fact that his work is available in English, Spanish, and French. Its purpose is to provide methodology which models inclusiveness, equity, and tolerance of differences.

Citation: UN Center for Human Rights. United Nation Publications. $5.00.

Media Type: Book

Abraham’s Children: Israel’s Young Generation (1991)

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Recommended because Sichrovsky’s timely book reveals through interviews a cross-section of the lives, thoughts, and opinions of 25 of Israel’s younger generation. Some of these Israelis are immigrants, others are sabras (native born); many are children of Holocaust survivors. Some come from Arab countries. One interviewee is a Christian convert to Judaism. Not all are religious, but most feel that Israel is their country, bought and fought for by them, and that no part of it should ever be given away. Some would come to a compromise with the Palestinians. A young Israeli Arab doctor would not exchange his life in Israel for one in an Arab country. It is regrettable that no interviews of representatives of the well-known urban religious communities such as Bayit Vegan or B’nai Brak or settlements such as Ariel and Kiryat Arba were included in this book. Recommended for public libraries. Elaine R. Sherer, formerly with Massachusetts Bay Community College Library, Wellesley; reviewed for the School Library Journal.

Citation: Sichrovsky, Peter.

Media Type: Book

Access Islam

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its classroom resources and lesson plans for grades 4-8. Developed by PPS. Start by watching the videos, reading the lesson plans and timeline, and using the glossary.

Addicted to Black (NYU)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its focus on Palestinians and Israelis using the important coffee culture of the Middle East. Topics and materials: This documentary uses the rituals surrounding the drinking of coffee as a way to examine daily life for Palestinians and Israelis. The “culture of coffee” is shared by both communities and the filmmakers use it as a context in which to compare life in the Arab communities and on Israeli settlements. [ZG] Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

AET Book Club (Arizona)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its discounted Middle Eastern books. Topics and materials include Middle Eastern books and multimedia. Choose from a variety of subjects including Arab-Israeli conflicts, cookbooks, Islam, literature, photo essays, women’s issues, general interest, children’s books and more. Go to the Bargain tab to find a list of discounted materials. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 3/25/02.

Afghan Caravan (1991)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is the telling of history rich in adventure, tradition and wisdom. How did this third world country come to win three wars against the British Empire and precipitate the breakup of the Soviet Union, the superpower? Here is a collection of writings that takes the reader on a spellbinding journey through narratives from a Pathan princess, heroic stories, Mulla Nasrudin (Joha in the Arab World) jokes, recipes and more. Revealed is a magnificent culture, hidden from the history books, contributing to the human story in ways most Westerners are never aware of. Outside of our geographic area (Arab World) but within the context of the world of Islam. A valuable tool for incorporating the culture of the new wave of Middle Eastern immigrants — our Afghan students and their families. Recommended for 7th-12th Grades, Social Studies. Ordering information available on the AWAIR ordering site. Reviewed by AWAIR.

Citation: Shah, Safia.

Media Type: Book

Afghan Tales (1991)

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Recommended because it gives a soviet perspective on the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. The stories are fictional but based in historical fact. Available from the Middle East Studies Center Resource Library, contact Mary Beth Benecke for ordering information. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Citation: Yermakov, Oleg.

Media Type: Book

Afghan Web

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is the best site available for accurate information on the history and ethnic groups of Afghanistan. This site provides the most accurate historical information, the material is presented towards middle and high school students, the site is updated daily so the links always work. Start by clicking the link titled History. This link includes information not generally found on the web and would be difficult to find at the library. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Afghanistan – washingtonpost.com

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Recommended because it provides basic information on the US’s continuing involvement in Afghanistan, the new Afghan government and other general information. Strengths of this site – information is concise and brief, excellent map, and good for classroom use. Be aware of the fact that the site does not go in depth in explanation and Washington Post articles are at a higher reading level than most K-12 grades. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Afghanistan Today – Time On Assignment Special

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Recommended because it provides the latest information on the rebuilding of Afghanistan. Strengths of this site – easy to read articles that can be used in the Middle and High School classroom and excellent photographs that are good for web classroom use. Be aware of the fact that there is not much information other than photographs. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Afghanistan Unveiled (2003)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it was filmed by the first ever team of women video journalists trained in Afghanistan. This rare and uncompromising film explores the effects of the Talibans repressive rule and recent U.S. military campaign on Afghani women. None of the fourteen journalist trainees had ever traveled outside Kabul. Except for one, none had been able to study or pursue careers while the Taliban controlled their country.
Leaving Kabul behind for the more rural regions of the country, the filmmakers present heartbreaking footage of Hazara women whose lives have been decimated by recent events. With little food and no water or electricity, these women have been left to live in caves and fend for themselves, abandoned in the wake of the U.S. campaign. While committed to revealing such tragedies to the world, the filmmakers also manage to find moving examples of hope for the future. A poetic journey of self-discovery, Afghanistan Unveiled is a revelatory and profound reminder of the independent medias power to bear witness and reveal truth. Directed by Brigitte Brault and Aina Women Filming Group. This film can be found at http://www.wmm.com/beyondtheveil/

Media Type: Media

Afghanistan’s Endless War (2001)

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Recommended because this book contains information that explains the rise of the Taliban in Afghanistan. Be aware that it is written from a Pakistani perspective, but has useful maps and good content. Can be used in the upper level high school classroom. Available from the Middle East Studies Center Resource Library, contact Mary Beth Benecke for ordering information. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Citation: Goodson, Larry.

Media Type: Book

Afghanistan: A Short History of Its People and Politics (2002 )

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Recommended because it provides a brief history and political analysis of Afghanistan. It is not written in academic language and can be used in the upper-level high school classroom as a text book. Photo section is descriptive and has explanations of dress and cultural ties. Available through The Ohio State University Libraries or any book seller. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

<Citation: Ewans, Martin.

Media Type: Book

Afghanistan: Captives of the Warlords (2000, CBC)

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Recommended because it focuses on Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Canadian Broadcasting Company journalist Arthur Kent has covered that war-ravaged country since 1988 when the Soviet army battled the mujaheddin and went to an inglorious defeat. This film was produced in 2000 and updated in September 2001 (before the U.S. bombed Afghanistan) when Kent dared to shoot with a hidden camera. Footage shot a decade ago shows a deeply troubled, poor country — but one in which the Afghans had their freedom, their culture, and their spirit. Under the extremist Taliban regime, the most repressive edicts had been issued: the playing of music was banned; women had to be heavily veiled and were not allowed in schools; adultery was punished by stoning, and theft by amputation. Not recommended for children. Available from the Middle East Studies Center Resource Library, contact Mary Beth Benecke for ordering information. Review by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002 and Publisher.

Media Type: Media

Afghanistan: The Lost Truth (2003)

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Recommended because Iranian filmmaker Yassamin Maleknasr takes an unprecedented journey across Afghanistan from Herat to Balkh, becoming the only woman and filmmaker to have traveled such distances since the fall of the Taliban. Despite the turmoil and suffering they have endured, the women, men and children she encounters have heroically held on to their hopes for the future. Maleknasrs survey is thoughtful and diverse, ranging from rural families who dream of steady employment and peace, to proud female medical students who aspire to serve their country. Extraordinary interviews include a frank discussion about Taliban repression with one of the countrys only women judges, and an emotional conversation with filmmaker Siddiq Barmak, director of the Afghani feature Osama, describing the regimes senseless destruction of countless films and works of art. Exquisite camerawork throughout captures subtle facial expressions, architectural grandeur and a landscape of disarming beauty, painting a vivid portrait of both the Afghani people and their country. The film is a remarkable tribute to a people in search of equilibrium and determined to rebuild their beloved nation, and a fascinating look at Afghanistan from an Iranian perspective. This film can be found at http://www.wmm.com/beyondtheveil/

Media Type: Media

Afghanistan: The Untold Story of a Land and Its People (2001, National Geographic)

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Recommended because National Geographic goes deep into Afghanistan to bring back a vivid portrait of the tumultuous country that is no longer accessible to journalists and filmmakers. Features in-depth interviews with the late Afghan resistance leader Ahmad Shah Massoud, who was assassinated two days before the September 11 terrorist attacks in the United States. Includes exclusive interviews with Taliban soldiers being held by the Northern alliance. Looks a refugees who speak plainly of their suffering from the effects of Taliban rule and the decrees that are especially harsh for women. Recommended for middle and high school students studying Afghanistan or the attacks of September 11. Available from the Middle East Studies Center Resource Library, contact Mary Beth Benecke for ordering information. Reviewed by Publisher.

Media Type: Media

AIMS – American Istitute for Maghrib Studies

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it focuses on the Maghrib region, which consists of Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco. It provides information on AIMS, AIMS Programs, Newsletter, and Related Links.

Ain al-Yaqeen

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Recommended because it is a primary resource for teachers and educators for insight into the Gulf Arab states such as Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Bahrain. Site is an online magazine with articles and pictures. Strengths of this site include availability in English as well as Arabic, authentic content materials, and all the articles are archived by date. Be aware of the fact that the material in this site reflects the opinions and views mainly of the Saudi Royal family and its supporters. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Akhet Egyptology (Texas)

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Recommended because it offers interactive access to Egyptian history. Topics and materials include Akhenaten & Amarna, Tutankhamun, mummy masks, art of the afterlife, grave goods, tombs & temples, sculpture, mythology, clickable mummy, the king list, Scottish Egyptology, museums & collections, Akhet bookshop. Start by using the Clickable Mummy link. Click on different parts of the mummy to learn about mummification.

Akhet-Aten Home Page (Texas)

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Recommended because it is a good resource for Egyptian history, Amarna period. Re-creation link. Topics and materials include introduction, Akhenaten, Nefertiti, Aten, Akhetaten, art, literature, digging, glossary, new & cool, bookshop, discussion, events, postcards, web links, references, for students, for teachers, re-creation, and FAQ. This site also has updates on current events around the country related to Egypt. Start by visiting for students , for teachers , and re-creation links. Be aware of the fact that this site was last updated in 2000.

Al – Islam

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Recommended because provides information about Shi’a Islam from the perspective of the Shi’a community. Start by reading about “Shi’i beliefs as explained by the Shi’i” in the first chapter of the book they have published on line, “Inquiries about Shi’a Islam.” Be aware of the proselytizing aspects of this site and some information may be culturally biased.

Al Bawaba, The Middle East Gateway (Harvard)

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Recommended because it is a good online newspaper, and especially for its online program for kids. For older readers there are topics on the region and individual countries. Topics and materials include news, business, travel, entertainment, games, kids, shop, e-cards, downloads, editorial, report, and in the spotlight. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 3/29/02. Start by clicking the “Kids” link, which will take you here. Here students can see artwork and writings of Middle Eastern children. Kids can join the club, send e-cards, play games, see pics of various animals, and more. Be aware of the Kids link not providing news at a young reader’s level, though is good for kids to connect to the Middle East through games, activities, etc.

Al-Awda (The Palestinian Right to Return Coalition)

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Recommended because it is a primary resource on Palestinians inside and outside of the U.S. and their refugee status. Strengths of this site include current information on refugees and news stories from within Palestinian territories, excellent primary source with views and information reflecting those of the Palestinian people (as opposed to Palestinian government or the Israeli government), other information on Awda and its activities can be found in the Articles section, information on Media resources are available. Recommended for K-12 teachers developing a unit on the Arab World or Palestine or Refugees. Be aware of the fact that only the Palestinian point of view is represented. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Al-Ayyam Newspaper (Arabic only)

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Recommended because it is a primary resource for news and information on Palestinian communities and refugees inside and outside of the Palestinian territories. Strengths of this site include the quality of the information provided, all articles are archived and maintained up to three months, and the information is well organized. Be aware of Please be aware that this site is in Arabic only and due to the way it was designed it takes a while to load the pages. This site will be most useful for instructors of Arabic. Also, some information may be biased, but is an alternative to the mainstream American media on the Palestinian situation in the occupied territories. The articles are available as PDF files, and one must have Adobe Acrobat Reader in order to retrieve them. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Al-Funun (Arabic)

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Recommended because it is useful for studying the history of Arabs in America and Arabic literary movement in the United States. Start by reading one of the past issues of the journal which address issues with which early Arab-American populations dealt. Strengths of site: Educators can use the material in high-school classrooms or they can use this site if producing a unit about Arab-Americans and their historical role in the United States. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Al-Jazeera (Harvard)

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Recommended because of its reputation as a CNN style news report agency of the Middle East. Topics and materials include news, seminars & talk shows, business, sports, documentaries and light entertainment. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 3/29/02. Be aware of this site being a political hot bed, discussing topics of intense political nature. This resource was originally recommended by Harvard University.

Albalagh Home Page

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Recommended because Recommended for elementary school teachers looking for primary sources to use in the classroom. Start by clicking on Children. This entire section of the site is devoted to Children and understanding Islamic practices through Muslim children’s point of view, concise History of Islam included. Be aware of the fact that some of the material found on this site is religiously biased since it is maintained by an Islamic group. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 12/2002.

AlefBet on the Net

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Recommended because of its usefulness for K-12 language teachers as an introduction to the Hebrew language. Also recommended for teachers of Hebrew for lesson plan ideas and online classroom activities. Strengths of this site include information and introduction to the Hebrew alphabet and Hebrew language, material is presented in clear, concise manner. Start by examining the Hebrew language tutorials. Be aware of the fact that there is not yet sound integrated so that one may hear what the vocabulary or phrases sound like. The resource was originally recommended by the University of Oregon. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Aleph-Bet Telethon: Discovering The Hebrew Letters (1999)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its teaching children the Hebrew alphabet through the famous characters of Sesame Street. Topics and materials: The next time someone says, “Can you tell me how to get to Sesame Street?” you’ll be able to answer. In Hebrew. Bert and Ernie, Grover, Cookie Monster and Elmo are off on a magical tour of Israel. So grab hold of the nearest hand and come along for the fun! Thrill to the sounds of your Sesame Street pals as they speak Hebrew and English! And make new friends with Jerry Stiller as he explores the people, places, traditions, and culture of Israel. Shalom Sesame. Like a picture postcard that not only wishes you were here, it takes you right along! Show 9 ? Aleph-Bet Telethon. The street signs have gone blank. The newspapers have no print. Can it be? Have the letters on Israel’s Sesame Street all disappeared? Tune in for a terrific telethon when Jerry Stiller and Kippi ben Kippod, Israel’s peppiest porcupine, try to raise all 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet! Watch Joan Rivers, Nell Carter, Jeremy Miller, Tracy Gold, and Itzhak Perlman as they call in special letter donations. Even Moishe Oofnik and his Sesame Street cousin, Oscar the Grouch, lend a hand-sort of. And don’t touch that dial: there’s down-to-the-wire suspense as everyone tries to find the last missing letter. Available through the Middle Eastern Studies Center at the University of Arizona. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Children’s Television Workshop. Reviewed by the Middle Eastern Studies Center at the University of Arizona, 4/29/02.

Media Type: Media

Algeria: Women at War (1992, 52 minutes)

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Recommended because of its information on Women during the sturggle for Algerian independence. Topics and materials: This video deals with two distinct periods of national history for Algerian women: the empowering war for independence and everything after, which has meant a struggle to regain personal independence in the face of attempts to isolate and limit women’s lives. Through a series of compelling interviews interspersed with wartime footage, Algerian women recount their experiences on the front lines of the eight-year struggle against France ending with independence in 1962. Educated, illiterate, urban, and rural women discuss their roles in commando units, providing refuge and aid, and taking over men’s jobs in their absence. The remainder of the video moves through the 1980s and up to 1992, when the multi-party system that opened political participation for women has failed, the FIS is taking violent action against “disobedient” women, and President Boudiaf, who supported women’s rights, has just been murdered. A penetrating look at the relationship between women’s and the country’s recent history. [AGF] Produced by Parminder Vir. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

Algerian Embassy

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides contact information and other information such as consular section, economics and commerce,news and reports, etc. 2118 Kalorama Road NW, Washington DC 20008 (202) 265-2800 e-mail: embalg.us@verizon.net

Alia’s Mission: Saving the Books of Iraq

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it received the 2005 Middle East Book award by the Middle East Outreach Council. Start by reading the Amazon.com review.

Citation: Mark Alan Stamaty Knopf Books for Young Readers (December 14, 2004)

Media Type: Book

Alif is for Asad!

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Recommended because with its catchy songs and colorful graphics “Alif is for Asad” teaches and reinforces the correct identification and pronunciation of the letters in the Arabic alphabet. Video includes 6 parts: Zoo Trip teaches students the 28 letters of the Arabic alphabet and the vocabulary of 28 animals; Animal Words elaborates on the animal words of Zoo Trip; Funny Formations teaches the different shapes of the Arabic alphabet; Letters in Space reinforces the letter shapes learned in Funny Formations; ‘Phabulous’ Phonics concentrates on the proper pronunciation of each Arabic letter; and Arabic Achievement introduces students to Arabic Grammar. Excellent for all age groups learning Arabic or being introduced to Middle East or Muslim cultures. 30 minutes. Reviewed by Astrolabe Pictures and Jennifer Nichols, 02/2003.

Media Type: Media

All the Shah’s Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror

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Recommended because the text provides a full account of the overthrow of a Middle Eastern government in Iran by the United States. Reconstructs the events of August 1953 in an hour-by-hour account. Draws on research in the United States and Iran, and uses material from a long-secret CIA report. Explains the background of the coup and how it was carried out. (From the Publisher). Recommended for background information and primary source material on the U.S. involvement in Iran before the coup. Has detailed information that can be used in the high school classroom and can be used to set the context of current events in the Middle East. This resource was originally recommended by the Ohio State University. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Citation: Stephen Kinzer;

Media Type: Book

Alliance or Compliance? Analyzing Power Relationships Inside and Outside Afghanistan

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this lesson (designed for grades 6-8 and 9-12) asks important questions about the US involvement in the war against terrorism in Afghanistan. Be aware that this lesson plan asks students to think critically about US involvement in Afghanistan, especially its collaboration witht the Northern Alliance against the Taliban. The authors of the lesson plan clearly see US involvement in Afghanistan as part of a pattern in history of the US government allying with dictatorial regimes in order to combat other regimes that are seen as a bigger threat to American interests. The primary source material included in this site is a New York Times article entitled, “Alliance of Convenience.” Produced by the New York Times Learning Network, 2001. Reviewed by Bill Wolf, April 2002, updated July 2003. Start by reading the primary source material for this lesson which is a New York Times article entitled, “Alliance of Convenience.”Be aware of the fact that this lesson plan asks students to think critically about US involvement in Afghanistan, especially its collaboration with the Northern Alliance against the Taliban. The authors of the lesson plan clearly see US involvement in Afghanistan as part of a pattern in history of the US government allying with dictatorial regimes in order to combat other regimes that are seen as a bigger threat to American interests. Produced by the New York Times Learning Network, 2001.

American Association of Teachers of Arabic (AATA)

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Recommended because of its information on the teaching of the Arabic language. Start by clicking on About Arabic to learn about the Arabic language and its history. Be aware of the fact that this site is most suited for people who teach or want to learn Arabic.Arabic Programs provides information about various programs in the US and around the world.

American Forum on Global Education: National Interests and Global Security: The Case of Iraq

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Recommended because of its suitability for middle and high school level educators. This is a PDF file which can be downloaded (with Adobe Acrobat) and used as a handout in class in Iraq. Topics include: government, political situation (be aware that this is now outdated), maps, topography and geography. Also included is a list of background resources. This is an excellent reference guide which can be used in the classroom or used as a basis for lesson plan and teaching unit development. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 04/2003.

American Research Center in Egypt

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Recommended because of its information on ancient Egyptian history and the most recent archeological studies on the Egyptian empire. Strengths of this site include its extensive listing of the organization’s publications and the list of web links (endorsed by the Egyptian Archeological Society). Be aware of the fact that many of these resources are academic and my not be appropriate for the K-12 classroom. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee

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Recommended because it is a primary source for teachers on information about Arab-Americans and their communities in the United States. Strengths of this site include an Education Department which focuses on teaching about Arab History and Culture in the classroom, lists of resources for teachers, up-to-date information on current socio-political issues inside and outside of the U.S. Start by clicking on Education where you will find lesson plans on Stereotypes, Discrimination in the Workplace, Islam, and Arab Culture and Society. Be aware of the fact that there is much information on the site and may not be suitable for elementary and high school levels, some information may reflect the opinions of the Arab-American political community, but is an excellent resource for teachers. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

American-Turkish Council

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Recommended because of its information on Turkish heritage groups inside the United States and their business affiliations. Strengths of this site — good Calendar of Events listing of activities with the Turkish community, comprehensive membership list of business owned and operated inside and outside of Turkey. Be aware of the fact that this site may be of interest for teachers developing a teaching unit on world economics, but not much more information is available from this site. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 06/2002.

Americans for Middle East Understanding, AMEU (Texas)

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Recommended because it strives to create deeper understanding among U.S. citizens about the Middle East. Start by reading the bi-monthly journal, accessible online, entitled “The Link.” In addition, AMEU provides free and inexpensive materials to teachers. To find out more about these materials contact AMEU, under “Contact Us.” Under “Resources,” one can find an extensive list of web links about the Middle East. Be aware of the newsletter being in pdf format, for which you will needAdobe Acrobat Reader. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 3/27/02. This site was originally recommended by the University of Texas.

AMIDEAST (Texas)

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Recommended because of its database of children’s literature and other teacher resources about the Middle East. Topics and materials of interest include the Educational Resources link. Here you will find an extensive list of children’s literature, viewable by title, subject, or author. These books can be purchased through AMIDEAST. Posters, stencils, teaching units, and videos are available as well as books. AMIDEAST also offers study abroad programs. Start by clicking on Free Resources on Islam and Arabs to get a list of available free materials which you can use to experience the quality of AMIDEAST teaching materials. Be aware of the need for Adobe Acrobat Reader to read the free materials which are in pdf format.

Amoo Norooz: And Other Persian Stories (2000) (Persian)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Amoo Norooz is the story of the coming of the Persian new year, Norooz, which begins on the twenty-first of March, the first day of spring. Norooz is celebrated in Iran (Persia), Afghanistan, countires around the Persian Gulf, Turkey, parts of China, among the Parsi’s in India, and some former Soviet Republics such as Tajikistan, Uzbakistan, and Azerbaijan, to name a few. Like Santa Clause, who symbolizes Christmas and New Year for the Christians, Amoo Norooz is the symbol of the New Year for the Persians and those nations who have been influenced by the Persian civilization throughout history. This is one of the oldest tales passed down from generation to generation, keeping the tradition of Persian New Year alive. Because of the importance of this story, the publisher decided to print it in a bilingual, English-Persian, format. Reviewed by Publisher.

Citation: Jabbari, Ahmad.

Media Type: Book

An Account of the Kingdom of Caubul (1815)

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Recommended because it is the first real travel account of Afghanistan written by a westerner in late 19th century, pre-colonial Afghanistan. Excellent descriptions of peoples, their languages, geography, tribal affiliations and pre-state Afghanistan’s relations with neighboring India. Be aware of the fact that it is not easy to read as the spelling is much different than what we use today and may not be easily incorporated into a middle or high school classroom. May be useful as a reference for teachers or in excerpt form. Available through The Ohio State University Libraries. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Citation: Elphinstone, Mountserat.

Media Type: Book

An Internet Guide to Chabad Literature and Culture

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its usefulness for teachers and educators in developing a teaching unit on Orthodox Judaism. Site is geared mainly for other Orthodox Jews. Strengths of this site include — specific selections of the Torah in short and long form, good examples of Jewish art, excellent primary resource — interesting. This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Ancient Egypt

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Recommended because of its usefulness for K-6 educators developing a teaching unit on Ancient History, Egyptian Culture, the Middle East, and/or Global Culture Strengths of this site — excellent lessons on Ancient Egyptian Life, which can be used in the classroom or as a fun homework assignment, Temples link has brief, concise explanations of the Egyptian gods as well as accessible vocabulary explanations. One of the best sites for K-6 grades for an introduction to the Middle East teaching unit. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 11/2002.

Ancient Egyptian Culture Exhibit (Texas)

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Recommended because of its Egyptian History, interactive Ancient Egyptian Concentration Game. Topics and materials include daily life, art, military, architecture, hieroglyphs, religion, maps, history, and archeology. Nice site for teachers and students. Start by clicking on Daily Life which includes information about the Nile, Geography and Agriculture, Religion, Kinship and Marriage, Medicine, Hieroglyphics, Astronomy, Egyptian Astrology, Games, Hairstyles, Beauty Aids, Papyrus Paper Making,Sanitation and much more.

Ancient Israel & Canaan (Penn)

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Recommended because of its information on Ancient Israel & Canaan. This site was created for educational purposes and includes activities for school-age children. Topics and materials land-time, daily-life, economy,and religion. On any of these pages you can find to links to a glossary, bibliography, and suggested activities created for kids 8-12 years old. Land -Time includes a map, climate, chronology, excavations, and archaeology. Daily-Life includes bread, weaving, animals, storage, personal identity, writing, and warfare. The Economy link includes labor & crafts, trade, and Phoenicians. Religion includes religion of The Bronze Age, The Iron Age, and death. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/14/02.

Ancient Mesopotamia (Ancient Civilizations for Children Series) Documentary

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is an excellent resource for primary through middle school grades. “Join archeologist Arizona Smith and his young detective-in-training as they delve into the clues of the past to unlock mysteries of the world’s ancient civilizations… Today, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers is a barren desert. But centuries ago, this area in modern-day Iraq and southern Syria was known as Mesopotamia, a fertile plain that served as home to some of the earliest civilizations. Discover the Sumerian civilization, the first to successfully irrigate the region, form a government, and develop a written language. The program explores other civilizations that formed following the demise of the Sumerians – the warlike Assyrians and the prosperous Babylonians, who invaded Jerusalem under King Nebuchadnezzar.” 23 minutes. Reviewed by Schlessinger Media and Jennifer Nichols, 02/2003.

Media Type: Media

Ancient Persia

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its overview of Ancient Persia. Topics and materials include a simple overview of Ancient Persia. Be aware of the fact that the menu bar can be followed to an e-museum sponsoring several regions and times of the world, however, I was unable to locate more about Persia. There is good information at this link on other regions, though. This resource originally recommended by the University of Texas.

Annual Editions: Global Issues 09/10. (2009).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because new editions each year contain collections of 30-40 up to date articles from scholars and the world press that examine the most important global issues facing the planet.  The book has a world map, a glossary, a topic guide, and a list of related websites. This is one of many Annual Editions series. Others (see list on the Annual Editions website) are also relevant to specific issues as well as regional studies.

Citation: Jackson, Robert M. (editor). Guilford, CT: McGraw-Hill/Dushkin. http://www.dushkin.com

Media Type: Book

Arab Children Friends Association (ACFA)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its usefulness for K-6 educators looking for information on Palestinian children in the occupied territories. Strengths of this site — wonderful selection of games and jokes (in Arabic and English) and a description of youth activities for Israeli and Palestinian children. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 12/2002.

Arab Cinema: History and Cultural Identity (1998, Print)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its detailed narrative history with thought-provoking analysis, this study provides extensive coverage of cinema in the Arab World, tracing the industry’s development from colonial times to the present. It analyzes the ambiguous relationship with commercial western cinema, and the effect of Egyptian market dominance in the region. Covering North African, Syrian, Palestinian, Iraqi, and Lebanese cinema, Arab Cinema traces the influence on the medium of local and regional art forms and shows how indigenous and external factors have combined in a dynamic process of ‘cultural repackaging. Reviewed byArab Film Distribution.

Media Type: Media

Arab Film Distribution

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Recommended because of its listing of all films made in or about the Middle East (including Iran and Turkey). Strengths of this site – all films have detailed descriptions, all films can be ordered and purchased online, this is the most credible vendor for buying and selling films from and about the Middle East. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Media Type: Media

Arab Gateway (Arabic)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an introductory site for Arabic literature, poetry and folk literature. Strengths of this site: The poetry section has translated poems from the original Arabic with descriptions and brief analyses. Start by reviewing the language link in order to better understand the structure of ancient Arabic poetry and prose. Be aware of the chronology. The pre-Islamic era means before 622.

Arab Gateway — Maps of the Arab World

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Recommended because it is a good resource for K-12 social studies teachers for classroom use. Strengths of this site — maps of every Arab country are available features different items such as population, political boundaries, and satellite maps. Site is very easy to navigate. Be aware of the fact that some of the maps may be out of date by several years and some maps are large and take abnormal amount of time to load. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Arab Gulf States – Globe Trekker

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides a great introduction to three of the Arab Gulf States: Kuwait, United Arab Emirates and Oman. By visiting these countries we see three very different ways in which the Gulf countries have encountered and adapted to modernity. The tape begins with a trip to Kuwait City and deals with its transformation since the first Gulf War. Next the guide visits the UAE and shows the extreme drive to modernize through advanced infrastructural investment. Lastly, we see Oman and the balance between the modern facade of Muscat to the traditional coastal town of Salalah and the Empty Quarter. Start by providing an introduction to the historical and contemporary geography of the Middle East. The vast wealth in the smaller Gulf countries is certainly the exception rather than the rule in the region. Before examining places like Dubai, put its development in its geographic context.

Media Type: Media

Arab Net

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a good resource for K-12 teachers as a primary resource that can be used in the classroom, because it provides comprehensive information on the Arab world. Strengths of this site include — country data on all 22 Arab countries with information such as Flags, national anthems, population and geography, daily Arabic newspaper Al-Sharq Al-Awsat in Arabic (good primary source), Arab News Daily is another primary source but is offered in English, directory of country websites with information ranging from tourism to NGO operations in the Arab world (all primary source information), and at the bottom of the homepage is a directory of Arab-based companies with links to their sites (good information for economic research. Be aware of the fact that some of the news and information reflects the opinions of the web. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Arab Social Science Roundtable

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Recommended because of its vast web resources and information on 22 Arab nations.  Start by searching links to individual nations in left menu bar.  Navigating these links will present research centers, information centers, think tanks, and other entities providing peer-reviewed research about the Arab world.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Arab World and Islamic Resources

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Recommended because this is an excellent resource specifically for teachers and educators who want to use authentic Arab literary sources in the classroom. The books from this site are all found in libraries across the United States. This site is strongly recommended for all classrooms. Students are encouraged to begin with the literary page and read the reviews for more information. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols 05/2002.

Arab World News (OSU)

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Recommended because it gives a view of the Arab World through newspaper perspective. Topics and materials include those of a typical newspaper; travel, sports, business, health, and science. Also available are topics such as Arab politics, Arab economies, headlines, offshore news, Arabia FM, Arabia photos, energy review, WN Arabia, Arabia Trade, and more. Links are available to newspapers of various countries in the Arabian world, including newspapers written in Arabic. Online Newspaper. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 3/27/02. This resource was originally recommended by the Middle East Studies Center at the Ohio State University.

Arab World Project of the National Inst. for Technology and Liberal Education

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Recommended because of the quality and thoroughness of the information and because of the excellent organization of information into small chunks. Start by reading the History section. The bibliographies, and readings for each section (not just history) are excellent. Be aware of copyright issues regarding the reproduction of materials for classroom use.

Arab World Studies Notebook (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its extensive resources and information on Muslims and the Arab World. Topics and materials include Introduction, Islam, Q’uran, Ramadan, Hajj, Muslims World wide, Jerusalem, Arab Christians, Women, Education, Family, Food, Language, Literature, Folktales, Music, Art & Architecture, Archaeology, Contributions, Al-Andalus, Colonial Legacy, The U.S. and Arab World, Oil, Gulf War, Question of Palestine, Arabs in America, and Country Profiles. Available for purchase through AWAIR at http://www.telegraphave.com/gui/awairproductinfo.html. Also available for loan to central Ohio teachers at OSU Middle Eastern Studies Center. The University of Texas also loans out the Notebook. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware of the outdated material and references in the book.

Citation: Audrey Shabbas. AWAIR: Arab World and Islamic Resources and School Services and Middle East Policy Council. 513 pages. $49.95.

Media Type: Book

Arabia Line

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its information on the Arab Diaspora in England. Site will be of interest to teachers with Arab-Americans in the classroom. Strengths of this site include information on current events in the Arab world, Arab-run businesses, information on contacting Islamic and other religious and community centers and education resources for Arab parents. Be aware of the fact that this is a commercial site, there is a lot of advertising and some of the information is culturally biased, but is a good primary source. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Arabian Fairy Tales

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Recommended because it is a selection of 4 fairy tales from the Middle East, including “Sasha, Mansor and the Storks,”
“The Three Brothers and the Fairy,” “The Princess and the Mouse Yunus,” and the “Well of Sweetness.”Start by reading any of the stories. Linking to the main site, Tales of Wonder , will give you fairy tales from other world regions. Be aware of the main website warns, “Please note: not every story in this site is appropriate for all ages of children. It is recommended that responsible grownups preview the tales before sharing them with children.”

ARAMCO at Fifty (1993, 53 minutes) (NYU)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on the American oil industry in Saudi Arabia. Use in conjunction with Cities of Salt. Topics and materials: This promotional video focuses on the development of the American oil industry (and ARAMCO) in Saudi Arabia, beginning in 1933 with the first geological expeditions. Most valuable are early photos of exploration camps, regional topography, and the Arabian peninsula before development. The tape makes for a heroic tale, but as one might expect, fails to place American efforts in the larger context of oil exploration in the Arabian peninsula, Iran and Iraq that began with the British in the 1890s, and was joined by the Dutch, French and Americans in the next century. Briefly addresses the economics of oil and its effects on Saudi Arabia, preferring to concentrate on the good fortune it has brought to the kingdom. The Story of Oil is recommended for a history of oil and related development in the region, and Cities of Salt for a critique of the oil industry and its effects on Saudi Arabia. [AGF] Produced by ARAMCO. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU. Also available to teachers of the Pacific Northwest and upper Midwest States through the University of Washington. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Are You Listening? Voices from the Middle East: Different Voices, Different Lives (1998)

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Recommended because it is Cambridge, MA: The Teaching Resource Center, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University. 176 pages. $15.00. (OSU) Recommended for its teacher’s guide to addressing a variety of stereotypes through stories and situations. Topics and materials include Introduction, Family Matters, Women’s Voices, Outsiders, Twists & Turns, Varieties of Love, Student Activities, Background Notes, and Glossary. Available for purchase through the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard. Send a check to — Teaching Resource Center, Center for Middle Eastern Studies 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138. This guide is also on loan to central Ohio teachers through the OSU Middle East Studies Center. (See the OSU listing under Overview-Centers for more information.)

Citation: Carol Johnson Shedd

Media Type: Book

ARG

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its list of links on current information on Afghanistan. The site is easy to navigate and has links that work. Strengths of this site – good resource for alternative viewpoints and the links are updated regularly. Links of particular interest are Eldis Information on Afghanistan, Institute of War and Peace, and RAWA, under Links to other Internet Resources. Start by looking over the links under the title “Institutes and Societies working on Afghanistan” at the bottom of the Links to other Internet Resources page. Be aware of the fact that some of the links open pages with many pop-up advertisements. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003. Melek Oyman Last Modified: 19/07/2004

Art and the Islamic World (1993, 32 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its focus on art in Islam. An excellent and easily accessible video that uses as illustrations slides of architecture, art and fine arts from all over the Islamic world, including Macedonia, Nigeria, North Africa, Western Asia and China. Each slide is helpfully labeled with a country location and century, allowing even those unfamiliar with Islamic art to note differences by region and time period. The narration begins with a brief introduction to Islam, offering theories on why Muhammad distrusted the arts of figurative sculpture and painting. The film discusses secular and religious themes, figures and styles characterizing art and architecture in Islamic countries, and helpfully points out that the idea of “Islamic art” is as hard to define as is the idea of Christian art. A concise, useful introduction that successfully conveys the breadth and variation of art in the Islamic world. [AGF] Produced by Walter Denny and Carel Bertram for Middle East Institute. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU. Also available to teachers of the Pacific Northwest and upper Midwest States through the University of Washington. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Articles on Ancient Persia

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its web resources on Ancient Persia. Several topics are listed under the headings of Topography, Royal Persons, Other Persons, and Other. From the top of this page you can also go to other pages on the same website. These would include Anatolia, Egypt, Judaea, Mesopotamia, and more.

Arts of the Abbasid Period, 750-1258 A.D. (Columbia)

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Recommended because of its online museum of art from the Abbasid period, as well as from other periods and regions of the Middle East. Topics and materials include online museum of art, map and a brief history of the region with links to further information. I recommend clicking on the Related Timeline Content menu bar (in the upper right hand corner) in order to get to other sites within the museum including Anatolia, Arabian Peninsula, Egyt, Iran, Iraq, Calligraphy, and a lot more. Use the Timeline Site Map link to access a timeline to see art from different periods.

Asharq al-Awsat – english edition

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Recommended because it is a widely published international arabic newspaper, with an English edition published online daily. Start by Checking out the current headlines, opinion features and book reviews.

Asian Governments on the WWW (Chicago)

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Recommended because of its database of Middle Eastern country information. It includes links basic country profile information and links to other websites, organized by country. Start by looking at the List of Countries. Be aware of some sites that may promote and support violence against the United States. The links provided by the site are just links and does not support their political views. Additionally, this site is not updated frequently so some links are broken or do not guide you to sites that are no longer educational in nature. Look at the URL, and if it doesn’t end with an abbreviated version of the countries name, do not assume it is the site of an official institution.

Asian History on File (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because for Students, teachers, scholars, and general readers, this wide-ranging resource provides over 1000 reproducible maps, charts, timelines, and drawings. Asian History and culture from ancient times to the present are covered in five main sections: Prehistoric South Asia (the subcontinent); China; Japan and Korea; and Southeast Asia. A comprehensive matrix table of contents offers multiple entry points for fast and independent chronological, topical, or geographical searches. Printed on durable card stock, pages feature fine details and easy-to-read lettering for making clearly visible photocopies. Recommended for grades 7 and up. Reviewed in UCLA Center for East Asian Studies Curriculum Resources http://www.isop.ucla.edu/eas/web/curric-web.htm Available from Social Studies School Services ($165): http://socialstudies.com

Citation: The Diagram Group. New York: Facts on File ($185.00)

Media Type: Book

Association for Israel Studies

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its focus on the study of Israel. This site would be most useful for Teachers doing research on Israel. Start by reading some of the online papers from the annual conferences. Be aware of the fact that all other information on this website is geared toward members or academicians.

Association for Middle East Women’s Studies (AMEWS)

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Recommended because it addresses issues of women in the Middle East in an academic environment, not influenced by the popular media. Strongly recommended for teachers and educators developing a teaching unit on Islam, Women or Women and the Veil. Start by looking at the titles of articles in issues of the AMEWS academic publication the MEWS Review to get a feel for the type of scholarship. Be aware of the academic content of the site and its associated journal may not be an appropriate level for K-12. However, the content may be used in part for lesson plan ideas and lesson plan development.

Astrolabe Islamic Media

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Recommended because it can be used as a reference for books, movies, videos and music available to teachers for ordering products for classroom use. Start by clicking on New for Kids where specific materials for kids are available and the materials themselves have excellent cultural value. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

At The Tomb of Tutankhamen

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Recommended because of its well done interactive site on the site of Tutankhamen. Information on the IMAX movie, Mysteries of Egypt, can also be found here. Teacher materials. Topics and materials include background information on the site of Tutankhamen including correspondence and author information. Written in first-person story-form are the first three days of Williams’ journey into the tomb. Photos are included. Start by looking at the activity guides(under Links and Resources) which include archaeology, architecture, art, geography, math & science, and writing to learn how you can integrate Egypt across the curriculum.This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas.

Attan, the Afghan National Dance

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Recommended because it demonstrates the Afghan national dance. Attan is a Pashto word. Go to Youtube to find several different recordings of it online, including the version for women. No wedding is complete without it – almost every Afghan knows how to do it. Source: Alam Payind, Director, Middle East Studies Center, the Ohio State University. Be aware of the dance starting with a low tempo, steadily growing faster, and ending with vigorous movements.

Avalon Project – Yale University

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Recommended because it provides english translations of many of the most important primary source documents concerning the Middle East, 1910 to present. Start by reading the Sykes-Picot Agreement and Balfour Declaration – two critical moments in the history of the region.

Avaye Zan (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its topics and materials include Who are We?, Leader, Human Rights, Culture, Cinema, Social, Diaspora, Poetry, Links. Great for a look into women’s lives in the Middle East.Iranian Cultural Women’s Magazine Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/22/02. This site was originally recommended by the University of Texas.

AWAIR – Arab World and Islamic Resources

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Recommended because of its usefulness for K-12 teachers looking for resources on the Arab and Islamic world. Strengths of this site — guides available for teachers to use in the classroom on teaching about the Arab world, lesson plans and workshops, literature suggestions for use in the K-12 classroom. Start by clicking on shopping to view all the resources (books, vidoes, etc.) available. Be aware of the fact that it takes up to 12 weeks to receive products ordered from this site. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Awesome Library – Middle East page

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Recommended because it provides a list of sources relating to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. The list of news sources is particularly good because it provides a variety of viewpoints: from inside the conflict, it provides Palestinian and Israeli news sources, from the outside, Arab sources, as well as American and British are included. Start by taking current news from the listed news sources and looking at a single story, or several stories, from the different standpoints. The goal of the activity is to deduce what cultural values are behind the reactions from each side. Then you might explore the lesson plans – particularly Mr. Donn’s simulation of the conflict, under “Materials”. Be aware of the fact that this page provides some materials which are not up-to-date.

Ayasophia. (199?, 26 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on Ayasofia in Istanbul. Topics and materials: A visit to Ayasofia includes a historical overview of this great monument completed in 537 for the Emperor Justinian as a church, and converted to a mosque after the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. Explores the treasures and tales of the spectacular building in Istanbul, now a museum whose gardens house the largest Ottoman royal tombs, containing the bodies of a number of sultans and princes. Directed by Suha Arin for MTV-Istanbul. Recommended for middle and high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU. This video is also available through the University of Arizona. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Aziz the Storyteller

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Recommended because this enchanting children’s book tells a tale of a young boy who loves stories; a weary old man wishing to pass on his magic; and a small faded carpet exchanged for a donkey. This story weaves itself in and out of carpets, marketplaces, tales and magic, succeeding in creating a tapestry to delight children and adults alike. Vi Hughes is well equipped to write this tale, being a parent, educator and student of children’s literature. Stefan Czernecki is an acclaimed children’s books illustrator, and adds visual impact to Aziz the Storyteller through his apt illustrations. Reviewed by Stacey International.

Citation: Hughes, Vi and illustrated by Stefan Czernecki

Media Type: Book

Baba (The Father) (1973, 95 minutes)

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Recommended because it is one of the well-known films by director Yilmaz Guney. Yilmaz Guney (Yol) directed this important Turkish film about a desperately poor boatman who agrees to frame himself for a murder so that, in return, his family will receive financial assistance. But after 24 years at hard labor, he discovers that his sacrifice has been in vain; his daughter has become a prostitute and his son is one of the murderer’s henchmen. A powerful, tragic film. Reviewed byArab Film Distribution, all ordering information available for www.arabfilm.com. Fiction.

Media Type: Media

Babel.com for Arabic

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its usefulness for teachers and educators that want a very basic understanding of the Arabic language. Strengths of this site include lessons in Arabic which can be used in the classroom, easy to navigate, excellent language resource, good introduction to the Arabic language. Be aware of the fact that computers must have sound and fast connection speed to utilize the lesson plans. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

Babylon, 580 BC

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Recommended because of its extensive information on Babylon under the rule of King Nebuchadnezzar. Topics and materials include The City, The People, The History, Image Galleries, and Discussion Forums. The site includes information such as daily life, mathematics, major sites, law, culture, literature, astronomy, star signs, and the planets. I recommend The City link for information such as history, location and maps as well as important landmarks such as the Tower of Babel, the Hanging Gardens and more. Be aware of the fact that this link is not a reliable source for further web connections. This resource originally recommended by Columbia University. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/14/02.

Babylonian and Egyptian Mathematics

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Recommended because of its information on how Babylonians and Egyptians contributed to math. Click on Babylonian Mathematics to learn more about an overview of Babylonian math, Babylonian numerals, Pythagoras’s theorem in Babylonian mathematics, a history of Zero. Click on Egyptian Mathematics for an overview, Egyptian papyri, Egyptian numerals and a history of zero. I recommend following some of the links listed near the bottom of the page especially the History Topics Index link. This resource was originally recommended by Columbia University.

BADIL: Resource Center for Palestinian Residency & Refugee Rights

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Recommended because for use by K-12 educators as a primary resource on Palestinian refugees and their situation inside and outside of the Arab world. Strengths of this site – available in Arabic and English, excellent summary of the Palestinian situation in non-academic language (recommended for Middle and High School classroom use), good overview of advocacy programs operating inside and outside of the Middle East, highlights of International law available in concise language, and publications available for free online.

Bahrain Embassy

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Recommended because it provides contact information as well as current news, tourism, Bahrain links, etc.The Embassy of the Kingdom of Bahrain 3502 International Drive N.W., Washington, DC 20008
Phone: (202) 342-1111, Fax: (202) 362-2192

Balkan Ghosts : A Journey Through History (Vintage Departures)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because “Balkan Ghosts” is perhaps the most influential book in America which deals with the subject of the Balkans. It seeks to explain the maze of ethnic groups in Southeastern Europe as well as the conflicts and grievances that exist between them. Admirers claim that Kaplan succeeds admirably in making sense of the Balkans for outsiders, especially the ethnic conflicts of the former Yugoslavia. Critics charge that Kaplan is a dilettante who writes well but lacks anything more than a superficial understanding of Balkan society and history. Availability: this book may be purchased through Amazon.com for $11.20.

Citation: Robert D. Kaplan (paperback, 307 pages, Reprint edition, March 1994)

Media Type: Book

Barnga: A Simulation Game on Cultural Clashes. (1990).

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Recommended because Barnga is a simulation card game which simulates real-life cultural encounters involving differing perspectives on seemingly similar cultural experiences. Players encounter mini-culture shocks which must be overcome and reconciled with other players without speaking. The handbook provides debriefing instructions, rules for preparing, conducting, and facilitating Barnga sessions, and various options for using Barnga in cross-cultural settings. Participant instructions are in English, French, and Spanish. The handbook is recommended for adults and adult learning/work settings, however the simulations can be adapted to P-12 students.

Citation: Thiagarajan, Sivasailam. Yarmouth, ME: Intercultural Press. (Available from Intercultural Press, Inc. http://interculturalpress.com ($29.95).

Media Type: Book

Bashu, the Little Stranger (1985, 120 minutes)

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Recommended because of its focus on the life of a young boy during the Iran-Iraq war. Topics and materials: This award-winning film by director Bahram Beizai is set during the Iran-Iraq war. Bashu, a young boy who has lost his home and family in wartorn Khuzestan, flees to Gilan, where he is adopted by a village woman despite the language and cultural differences and the objections of the other villagers. A brilliantly and sensitively photographed allegory of a boy’s search for meaning and identity, and his personal transformation. Directed by Bahram Beizai. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU. Also available to teachers of the Pacific Northwest and upper Midwest States through the University of Washington. Bashu is also available through the University of Arizona. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Bat Shalom of the Jerusalem Link (Harvard)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because its Israeli feminist peace organization with focus on peaceful coexistence of Palestine and Israel, with the main goal of sharing Jerusalem as a capital. Topics and materials include Ongoing Activities, Upcoming Events, various articles about issues of Jerusalem. This is a good site to visit to see what the women of Israel are doing about working towards peace. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/18/02. Revised by Jennifer Nichols, 04/2003 This resource originally recommended by Harvard University.

Battle of Algiers (1966, 125 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it shows Algeria’s struggle of independence.Gillo Pontecorvo. Images and Echoes (NYU). Topics and materials: This vivid reenactment of the Algerian struggle for independence from France, 1954-1962, is presented in documentary style from the point of view of the FLN fighters. It graphically presents the contrast both architecturally and culturally between the medina, the old city, and the European metropolis, with the FLN employing elements of both cultures in their struggle against the French army. The brutalization of the French recruits and the descent of all combatants into terrorism make this film a classic of cinema verit

Media Type: Media

BBC – InDepth Iran

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its information on modern Iran and social issues surrounding current religious and economic reforms there. Start by reading the excellent articles on Women’s issues, the role of Iranian youth, and issues of democracy within Iran.

BBC News

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Recommended because this site provides comprehensive news coverage of events around the world.  It is easily organized by region (see tabs at top on homepage), type of media (video, podcast, blog, etc.), and issues.   Because BBC has affiliate stations around the world, broadcasts can be found in multiple languages.  This site is appropriate for grades 7-12. Many selections provide excellent maps, video and audio presentations. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

 

BBC News – World – Middle East

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Recommended because it provides access to current news about the Middle East from a reliable source. Start by reading the frequently updated news on the main page. In addition, you can get in-depth new about Iraq by clicking on Iraq in Transition.

BBC News Archive: Israel and the Palestinians

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Recommended because of its usefulness for teachers and educators conducting research on the recent history of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. Strengths of this site — complete and up-to-date information on the conflict, excellent timeline of events, special interest articles include information Israeli/Jewish Bedouins and other information not normally found in the American press. Start by reviewing the Timeline for important dates in Middle East history. Information is presented in an even and unbiased manner. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 06/2002.

Behind the Veil (2001, Films for Sciences & Humanities)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its focus on human rights abuses in Taliban ruled Afghanistan. For women living in Afghanistan under repressive Taliban rule, beatings, rape, and enslavement are commonplace occurrences. This gripping program describes the massive human rights abuses that have been escalating since the withdrawal of Soviet forces, as seen through the eyes of women who have survived years of rampant gender and religious intolerance — so far. Resistance activities carried out by women’s groups inside the country are also documented, as they fight for freedom and democracy. Some content may be objectionable. Not recommended for children. Available from the Middle East Studies Center Resource Library, contact Mary Beth Benecke for ordering information. Reviewed by Publisher.

Media Type: Media

Bethlehem Bible College

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a primary source on the Christian Palestinian population in Palestine. Strengths of this site — good introduction to a population of Palestinians not often mentioned in the American media and an excellent reference for breaking Middle Eastern stereotypes. Be aware of the fact that some information may be out of date. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Between Heaven and Hell: The Story of a Thousand Years of Artistic Life in Russia

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Recommended as a highly readable account of the entire sweep of Russian literature and the fine arts which is accessible to the non-specialist. Available from Amazon.com as a used book, both in hardback and paperback editions at different prices. Reviewed by Bill Wolf, May 2002; updated August 2003.

Citation: W. Bruce Lincoln, Viking Penguin (1998)

Media Type: Book

Between the Lines (1996, 30 minutes)

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Recommended because of its discussion of western views of Iranians. Topics and materials: As the film’s narrator explains, it tries to present “a more objective delineation” of Iran and Iranians, a worthy subject considering the typical American media images of the country in the nearly two decades following the revolution. The presentation is a bit stilted and amateurish, but the topic is important and the production an earnest one. This video addresses in particular the film Not Without My Daughter (1990), a TV movie based on the true story of a American woman who returns with her Iranian husband to post-revolutionary Iran, and is prevented by Islamic laws from leaving the country with her daughter. Includes comments by scholars, writers, and women married to Iranian men who have chosen to live in Iran, though no Iranians are interviewed. A platform for discussion on how media — especially non “news” programs like movies –shape our perception of other cultures and peoples. [AGF] Provided by the Iranian Mission to the UN (no director listed). Recommended for middle and high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Beyond the Walls (1984, 103 minutes)

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Recommended because it is about Jewish and Arab prisoners, locked up together in a central prison, decide to join forces despite their differences. When innocent people are framed for the murder of a Jewish prisoner and a young inmate commits suicide rather than lie about what happened, Uri and Issan form an unlikely partnership to take action with the prison officials. In the background are Uri’s daughter and Issan’s wife, women of beauty and passion who illuminate the distance from inside a prison cell to outside. It was an Oscar nominee. Fiction. Directed by Uri Barabash (Rated R). Reviewed by the Israeli Film Society.

Media Type: Media

Birzeit University in Palestine

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its information on the higher education system in Palestine. As one of the most educated Arab populations in the Middle East, there are a number of well respected Palestinian universities located in the territories of Palestine. Start by looking over the University Overview to get an idea of what the strengths of the college are. Strengths of this site — information the institution, clearly defined University/educational mission without biased analysis, and very easy to navigate. Excellent resource for educators and teachers developing teaching units on global education, dealing with stereotypes, and learning about Palestine outside of the conflict. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

bitterlemons.org – Palestinian-Israeli Crossfire

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Recommended because of its focus on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. In this site, each week’s edition has a theme such as Human Rights and the Conflict. Each theme is addressed by 2 articles written by Palestinians and 2 by Israelis. It is possible to review the previous themes by clicking on Archives. Also,bitterlemons-international.org can be accessed, but does not provide the Israeli viewpoint.

Blockade: The Silent War Against Iraq (20 Minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on how the embargo effects the people of Iraq. Topics and materials: Chronicles the daily economic and health struggles of the Iraqi people caused by the U.S./U.N. embargo. Very good at showing the truly innocent sufferers in the war between Iraq and the United States. Grades 9 and up. Available for loan through the University of Utah. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by the Middle East Center at the University of Utah, 4/29/02.

Media Type: Media

Bloodlines: From Ethnic Pride to Ethnic Terrorism

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Recommended because the author is world-renown psychiatrist who specializes in international relations. In this book, he explores ethnic violence by examining history and diplomacy from a psychoanalytic perspective. He examines the psychological impact of those who use the Battle of Kosovo as a rallying cry for ethnic warfare. He examines numerous other battlegrounds throughout the Middle East, Russia, Turkey, Cyprus, the Baltics, and the Balkans using the same approach. This book is appropriate for students grades 10-12.

Citation: Volkan, Vamik D. Westview Press ISBN 0813390389

Media Type: Book

Brit Tzedek v’Shalom – Jewish Alliance for Justice and Peace

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it focuses on efforts to build support for the fundamental principles of joint negotiations and a two-state solution. Here you can find information about Brit Tdezek, its activities and the Geneva Campaign. Start by reviewing Educational Resources for articles on current event and topics of special interest. Be aware of the fact that these article are from various newspaper and may be suitable for high school student for research.

CAIR – The Council on American Islamic Relations

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Recommended because of its coverage of current issues within the Muslim community of America. It also includes materials and information on Islam and Muslims for outreach purposes. Links to local chapter CAIR representatives and speaker information is also available. Start by reading the section on About Islam . There are also materials available for reasonable prices with information that can be used in the classroom or in curriculum development.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Cairo Station (74 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because ,in this beautiful classic film, Cairo’s main railroad station is used to represent all of Egyptian society. Directed by Youssef Chahine. We see a community comprised of luggage carriers and soft-drink vendors living in abandoned train cars. A crippled newspaper dealer, Kinawi (Chahine himself), falls in love with the beautiful but indifferent Hanuma, a lemonade seller who only has eyes for the handsome Abu Sri’. Swept away by his obsessive desire, Kinawi kidnaps the object of his passion, with terrible consequences. Chahine received international recognition when this masterpiece of sexuality, repression, madness and violence among society’s marginalized played at the Berlin Film Festival. Reviewed by Arab Film Distribution.

Media Type: Media

Calendars Through the Ages (Religions of the Middle East)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an interesting site specifically on the Islamic calendar. Chosen because this is a topic often overlooked when teaching about the Abrahamic religions of the Middle East: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Strengths of this site — each religious calendar has an explanation of why the calendar was established and when, as well as an overview of the Islamic Months. Be aware of one major weakness: it does not have any of the religious holidays listed. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 06/2002.

Calligraphy – Islamic Clip Art

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Recommended because the samples of calligraphy are available for educational use and the site helps in teaching about Arabic calligraphy, its various forms, meanings, and styles.

Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding (Religions of the Middle East) (Georgetown)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of information on Muslim-Christian relations in the West and how this effects their relationship in the Middle East. This site is recommended because it has extensive, in-depth, and academic resources which are recognized world-wide for their expertise on the topic of Muslim-Christian relations. Strengths of this site — list of Resources on the Islamic World, faculty members’ email addresses available (they do respond to inquiries), and site is up to date and well organized. Start by looking at the list of Islamic resources. Be aware of much of the material being academic. Some of it may not be useful in the K-12 classroom, but it is strongly recommended that teachers consult the site when developing teaching units on Islam and teaching about religion in the classroom. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 06/2002. This site was originally recommended by Georgetown University.

Chahinaz: What Rights for Women? (Algeria) 2007

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides the perspective of a young women on women’s rights within the context of her society and culture in Algeria, and provides a comparison to women’s views in other countries. It humanizes Muslim women and shows the variety of political stances they take as well as the reasons behind them.

Media Type: Media

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Changing Lives: Women of the Middle East (1993, 15 minutes)

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Recommended because of its look at women in the Middle East. This polished, professional short film investigates the diversity of roles traditional and nontraditional that women choose in contemporary Middle Eastern society, and explores the rewards and repercussions of these choices. She interviews three women: a young, university-educated Muslim Irani continuing her studies at NYU; a former prima ballerina from Egypt teaching at NYU (also a Muslim); and an older Egyptian, Christian woman whose economic status goes undiscussed. The women ponder lifestyle choices and how their decisions were shaped by their views and experiences of women’s roles in society, and by paternal relationships. [CNES] Directed by Colleen Caden, an MA alumna in the Joint Program in Near Eastern Studies and Journalism. Recommended for middle and high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

Children of Heaven Fiction

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Recommended because it is a triumphant prize winner at many prestigious film festivals. This uplifting, crowd-pleasing story of family and love was also nominated for an Academy Award as Best Foreign Language Film! When Ali loses his sister Zahra’s school shoes, this young pair dream up a plan to stay out of trouble: they’ll share his shoes and keep it a secret from their parents! But if they’re going to successfully cover their tracks, Ali and Zahra must carefully watch their step on what rapidly turns into a funny and heartwarming adventure. Directed by Hassan Hassandoust, Produced by The Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults. 83 minutes. Available through Arab Film Distribution. Reviewed by Buena Vista Home Entertainment and Jennifer Nichols, 02/2003

Media Type: Media

Children’s Encyclopaedia of Arabia

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Recommended because The Children’s Encyclopaedia of Arabia brings together a wealth of knowledge for younger readers to share with a parent or to peruse on their own. Deft organisation, skillful selection, and vivid illustration, under the editorial direction of an encyclopaedist whose professional life has been devoted to teaching the young in the region. This work is an irreplaceable asset for the informative delight of the young, such as casts light on all that they see and hear around them.This encyclopaedia provides a fascinating insight into both the history and modern day life of the region that will appeal to all ages, despite its obvious target audience.- The Middle East Magazine Reviewed by Stacey International 04/2003.

Citation: Beardwood, Mary

Media Type: Book

Chinese Personal Names

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Recommended because of a comprehensive look at names in China, where there are more styles of personal names than anywhere else in the world. Includes the requirements the Chinese take into consideration in choosing names, rules and taboos, famous names. Recommended for middle school/high school. Reviewed from Chinese Tapes on-line catalog.

Citation: Yegao, Ning & Yun, Ning $14.95.

Media Type: Book

Choices Educational Institute – Crisis with Iraq (Washington Institute)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its usefulness for K-12 educators looking for resources on teaching about Iraq. Strengths of this site — lesson plans for the high school classroom, lists of related topics and a resource list (some of which are found in this module. Start by browsing the various topics and lessons available from the Choices program. Be aware of the fact that Crisis With Iraq was posted by the Choices Program for use prior to the war with Iraq. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 03/2003.

Chronicle of a Disappearance (1996, 88 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it focuses on the personal struggle of Palestinians. What does it mean to be Palestinian in the second half of the twentieth century? Filmmaker Elia Suleiman was born in Nazareth in 1960, well after the establishment in 1948 of the state of Israel in historic Palestine. After twelve years of self-imposed exile, living in New York, Suleiman returns to the land of his birth in an attempt to find his roots. Chronicle of a Disappearance does not take a position on the political impasse of the Middle East. Rather, the film is a personal meditation upon the spiritual effect of political instability on the Palestinian people, their psyche, and their identity. As such, it is an invaluable contribution ot the struggle for peace in the region. Reviewed by Arab Film Distribution.

Media Type: Media

Cities of Salt (1992, 38 minutes)

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Recommended because of its view of how American oil has effects communities in the Middle East. This fascinating profile of novelist Abd el-Rahman Munif and his series of five books, beginning with Cities of Salt includes interviews with Munif, dramatizations and readings of his novels, and pre- and post-oil footage and photographs. Cities of Salt is the story of the destruction of a desert community by American oil men; successive books in the series follow the development of the surreal society left in its place. Munif’s sharp criticism (he calls the oil industry “alien…unconnected to what surrounds it”) misses neither the British who handed out oil concessions, the Americans who took them, nor the shortsighted Saudi rulers who allowed it all to happen. His critique provides a sharp contrast to the myth that oil has meant wealth and happiness for all Saudi Arabians. (Showing this title alongside ARAMCO AT FIFTY provides an opportunity for critical analysis for younger students.) Note: There is a two-minute space on the tape between parts I and II. [AGF] Directed by Christopher Spencer & Patrick Matthews. Produced by Tariq Ali. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Clickable Map of the Middle East

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is very easy to use. This site would be perfect for elementary and middle school students. After clicking on a country, information is provided about that country including links to news sources (T.V., radio, and/or newspaper) as well as information about population, ethnicity/race, literacy rate, geography, brief history, and more. This would be helpful in learning the geography of the Middle East. Be aware of the fact that some of the information, such as the information and resource links for Iraq, may not be current. The information on almost all of the presidents and prime ministers are outdated and incorrect.

ClickandZoom.com

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Recommended because of its web camera views of sites in the Middle East. Topics and materials include a directory of live web cams in various Middle Eastern cities. Currently this directory offers cams in Israel, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. Students can see the wall in Israel as well as Israeli beaches. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 3/26/02. Start by perusing the UAE through 4 different viewpoints, and can view scenery night and day in Istanbul.

Color Me Egypt

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Recommended because it is an excellent kid’s web source that provides great short fiction stories about Egypt, histories of Egypt and games.. All for kids! Start by going through the archives of the kid’s section from Tour Egypt Monthly magazine. Each issue has games, crafts and educational material for kids.

Columbia University, Middle East & Jewish Studies (Washington)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its internet resources. Topics and materials include a list of internet resources, electronic journals, and literature sources. Follow the Middle East Studies link to choose from a list of sites organized by topic. Topics include bibliographies, libraries, news sources, Middle East resources-regional and by country, Middle East resources by subject (subjects include religion, food, water, weather, women, Ancient Middle East, etc.), directories, Encyclopedia of the Orient, electronic journals and newspapers, graphics and images on Islam, Middle East scholarly associations, publishers and bookstores. Columbia University, 303 International Affairs, 420 W. 118th St. New York, NY 10027 (212) 854-3995 e-mail: mideast@libraries.cul.columbia.edu

Comparative Islam

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Recommended because it provides a variety of resources (links to all of them on one page which is convenient), each of them useful for presenting a different aspect of Islam and for giving a broader perspective on its history culture and peoples.

Conflicts in the Middle East Virtual Classroom (Religions of the Middle East; Ethnic Diversity and Conflict in the Middle East) (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides an overview and the background of conflicts in the Middle East. This site was created for the classroom. Start by clicking the Ottoman Empire link for a great introduction to the former Empire whose borders and territories largely correlate to what we think of as the Middle East today. The Ottoman Empire is a great place to start when discussing Middle East History, and should be included. Be aware of the explanation of Islamic Shar ‘ia law. Islam is considered to be a way to organize a society as much as a religion.

Constantinople and the Fall of Rome (Texas)

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Recommended because of its overview of Constantine and his role in the Middle East. This site was created for the classroom. Topics and materials include an overview of Constantine including why Constantine moved his government, Constantinople and the Christian Emperor. You may find the link to Christianity also helpful. This resource originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/14/02.

Contemporary Politics in the Middle East (2000)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it defines the Middle East and discusses Orientalism, Colonial Rule, Nationalism, Political Economy, War and Peace, Political Islam, Democratization, Women, and Ethnicity and Minorities.

Citation: Milton-Edwards, Beverly. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.

Media Type: Book

Contemporary Turkish Literature (Bogazici University)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a comprehensive site listing every contemporary Turkish writer and poet. Strengths of this site: samples of works are provided, very easy to navigate, pictures of works and authors available, literary analysis available for some authors, translators of works are also listed. Be aware of the fact that one should be familiar with some basic background in Turkish literature, but not much background is needed. Excellent resource for teachers and educators looking for books to use in courses at the middle and high school levels. This resource was originally recommended by Bogazici University. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Contemporary Turkish Literature: Fiction and Poetry (1982)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book is divided equally between prose and poetry selections. The introduction gives good background and context to modern Turkish literature from the Ottoman period to today. Recommended for teachers and educators as background to developing a teaching unit on Turkish literature or world cultures. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Citation: Halman, Talaat.

Media Type: Book