Results Filter:

  • Websites
  • Books
  • Media

31st December Women’s Movement (Women’s Issues)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is a non-governmental organization whose membership included 2.5 million women of all social conditions above the 18 years of age. Its President is Nana Kanadu Agyeman Rawlings, former first lady of Ghana. Start by clicking on the About Us link. Once here, visitors can read about the purpose and mission of the organization. For additional perspective on this site, you can read the article “First Lady Syndrome and the Marginalization of Women from Power”, from the link on the homepage of African History in this module.

A Garden of Eden In Decay (The Africans). (1986. 58 min. Video/C 945.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this resource identifies the problems of a continent that produces what it does not consume and consumes what it does not produce. It shows Africa’s struggle between economic dependence and decay and examines economic and agricultural failures and successes in Algeria, Ghana and Zimbabwe.

Media Type: Media

A Life Like Mine

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, March 3, 2010

A Life Like Mine tells the story of how children live around the world through four themes:  survival, development, protection, participation.  Excellent images and text suitable for upper elementary and middle school students. Truly has a global perspective. Includes many visuals and maps.

Is is published by UNICEF.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

A Man of the People (1966).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this novel foreshadows the Nigerian coups of 1966 and shows the color and vivacity as well as the violence and corruption of a society making its own way between the two worlds. This book is a satirical expose of a corrupt post-colonial government. Recommended for young adult readers.

Citation: Achebe, Chinua

Media Type: Book

A Story, A Story (1970)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this tale explains how Anansi obtained the world’s stories from God. Anansi the Spider is determined to buy back the stories taken from the people and kept by the Sky God. It has lively, evocative language and compelling illustrations that extend and illuminate the narrative, although Aardema’s version may be more suited to preschool listeners.

Citation: Haley, Gail

Media Type: Book

Abadja Rhythm – Drum Music of Ghana West Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its effort to present many musical instruments from Ghana. Students can create their own music rhythm by playing and muting the sounds of the musical instruments. Topics and materials included in this site are six music instruments from Ghana and an activity designed to help students play and create their own musical rhythms. Start by having students explore the sounds of various musical instruments.

Abantu for Development (Development/Women)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this organization focuses on providing information and advice regarding the mobilization of resources towards sustainable development in Africa. The strategic plan for 2001-2004 focuses on gender issues. This organization also produces a publication titled “Gender and Policy Matters.” This publication focuses on the gender implications of policy and is published quarterly. Start by visiting the About Us link. Here, visitors can learn more about the organization’s objectives and goals. Reviewed by Andre Patterson, 4/2002.

Access Russia

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because Access Russia offers a wide variety of Russia-related items including books, CDs, videos, as well as Russian language educational software and cultural items for gifts or teaching. Based in Sacramento, California. Be aware of the fact that at present (August 2004), Access Russia is only selling videos, but presumably will be offering its full line of products soon.

Adinkra Cloth (PBS Kid’s Africa)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides basic information about the Adinkra Cloth, a hand-printed fabric made in Ghana. Developed by the Ashanti people, Adinkra cloths were traditionally made for royalty to wear at religious ceremonies. This site teaches kids how to make their own Adinkra cloths and to tell a story or to express their thoughts or feelings though the decoration on the cloths with traditional Ashanti symbols. Great for elementary school kids.

Admin-Net-Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is a useful website to glean up-to-date country profile information on governmental authorities, public services, cultural and civic organizations. Be aware of the fact that many non-African countries are included as well.

Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides a wealth of general information about Africa. From Algeria to Zimbabwe, the information and student activities provide an introduction to Africa’s rich cultural heritage. Each of the five geographic regions is explored along with African climate, vegetation, wildlife, literature, art and music. A good resource for introducing students in the early elementary grades to Africa.

Citation: Gillespie-Washington, Barbara Publisher: Teacher Created Materials: October 1, 1998

Media Type: Book

Africa – U.S. Same Scale Map Comparisons (1993)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides separate outlines of the U.S. and of each African country for photocopies and transparencies. It also includes very useful statistical data for each African country and each U.S. state. This resources is available from World Eagle Publishers .

Media Type: Media

Africa Access

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides access to over 1000 recommendations and reviews of African books as well as instructional materials for teaching and learning about Africa. Strength(s) of site: Teachers are able to search for books and materials on different topics (apartheid, history, women, etc.) and time periods (1600s, early 1900s, 1990s). Start by searching for materials by country or topic of interest. Teachers may enroll in the Africana Book Buddies Club, which encourages students to read African literature. Be aware of the fact that many of the reviews and annotations were written by university professors, librarians and teachers who have either lived in Africa or earned degrees in African Studies. An excellent resource for reading reviews on children’s literature as it relates to Africa.

Africa Action (Michigan) (Human Rights/Advocacy)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site includes information about issues and actions in Africa. Topics and materials included in this site are documents of Africa’s right to health campaign, economy and development, democracy and human rights, peace and security, women’s rights, education in and about Africa, landmines, democracy in Nigeria, and Southern African Floods, and relevant links in each topics. Start by visiting the Landmines section, since it has links to key sites and documents with further information on the campaign to ban landmines and the global landmines crisis. Reviewed by Masataka Kasai, 4/23/02.

Africa Action profile on Nigeria and US relations

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because Nigerians are the most numerous of African immigrants in the U.S. This website provides useful background on Nigeria and issues related to governance, oil and so forth which affect and are affected by the Nigerian diaspora. The site contains several sections from Africa Action’s article on Nigeria in Great Decisions 2003, the annual briefing book and study series organized by the Foreign Policy Association.

Africa and The United States.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Africa, a continent of 55 nations is literally defined by dichotomy, a land of famine, human rights abuses and failed nation states but also of untapped wealth and the setting of one of history’s greatest nonviolent revolutions, the transition to Black majority rule in South Africa. These dichotomies are reflected in American foreign policy which seems caught between constructive engagement and benign neglect. Carol Lancaster, Dept. Asst. Sec. of State for African Affairs and Susan Rice, Asst. Sec. of State for African Affairs discuss American foreign policy in relation to Africa. Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, 1998. 26 min. Video/C 5822. Reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Africa Dreaming.

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this video provides four television shorts produced in four different African countries to be shown on the African television series Africa Dreaming. In Sophia’s Homecoming (Namibia) a woman who has worked as a domestic returns home to a terrible discovery: the ruptures caused by apartheid can never be repaired. In Sabriya (Tunisia) a modern woman disrupts the patterned mosaic of male Maghrebi society. So Be It (Senegal), based on a play by Wole Soyinka, follows the destruction of a well intentioned foreign doctor confronting fear, rage and powerlessness in a remote Senegalese village. The Gaze of the Stars (Mozambique) is a story about machismo in Mozambique, so powerful that it drives away whatever it loves. 1997. 112 min. Video/C 5400. Reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Africa Focus: Sights and Sounds of a Continent

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides the general public with a selection of images and sounds that have been contributed over the years to the African Studies Program of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It brings together images captured on slides and in photographs as well as sound recordings on reel-to-reel and audio cassettes that have been reproduced and stored on digital files accessible by any computer of a reasonable minimum capacity. This allows for patrons of the electronic library to experience these materials directly, or to use them to create presentations using a common digital format. It enables the academic and non-academic audience alike to move beyond the blackboard and the book as the primary means of conveying information and engenders an understanding that goes beyond the printed word. There are four ways visitors can access this site. Searches can be done by (1)collection, subject or country, (2)atlas, (3)keywords, and (4)multiple fields. (Explanation from the website.)

Africa Odyssey

Posted by: globaledadmin on Thursday, March 8, 2012

Recommended because this is a tourist site for East/Southeast/South African countries specializing in safaris, but also offering cultural tourism, fishing, diving, and camel/horseback riding opportunities.  In addition to accommodation information, there are brief status updates and descriptions of each countries’ attractions.  Also visit the blogs for personal accounts, news updates, and research updates in each country. Reviewed by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Africa on Roots World

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site offers reviews of African recordings by region, interviews with African musical artists and sound files such as the ensemble Samsu from Serrekunda, Gambia, or some new voice to the sounds of Cameroon from the artist Gino Sitson. There are also links to related sites.

Africa On The Move (1991)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it goes beyond the stereotypical images and allow Africans to speak for themselves. Through scenes of a farming family in Uganda and through brief interviews with Ugandan leaders, we come to see such families as agents of change. The video comes with a study guide and is appropriate for middle and high school students. Contact the African Studies Center at Boston University if interested in borrowing this video.

Media Type: Media

Africa Policy Information Center – African Women’s Rights

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides policy oriented reports on African women’s health, political involvement, human rights and links to related sites. APIC is based in Washington, D.C. Start by scrolling to the bottom of the page and clicking on any of the topics of interest. Reviewed by John Metzler, 7/2002.

Africa Renewal

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides accurate news and analysis on the critical economic and development challenges facing Africa. Strength(s) of site — easy to navigate, briefing papers are available in English and French. Start by clicking on About Africa Recovery . Learn about the purpose and focus of this unique organization. Be aware of this site was originally reviewed by the Stanford University Outreach Center for African Studies .

Africa Reparations Movement

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it is an organization that seeks to obtain reparations for the enslavement and colonization of African people in Africa and the African Diaspora. Goals also include return of African artifacts to Africa, acknowledgment of Africa’s contributions, and education of youth about Africa. Start by visiting the link titled Information About ARM . Here visitors can read about the goals and aims of the organization.

Africa Since Independence

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides brief but comprehensive examinations of Africa’s development since independence. The author divides his analysis of Africa into four main sections “The Romantic Period” (1939-1970), “The Period of Disillusionment, 19Middle East-1985, “The Period of Realism 1985 – and the “Period of Renaissance”. A good source for teaching and learning about Africa since independence.

Citation: C. Legum (1999). Indiana University Press.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

Africa South of the Sahara (Stanford) (Environment/Human Rights/Women/Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is an excellent resource – providing a plethora of annotated links on African countries and current topics in Africa. serves as a starting point provides a list of numerous links of websites on African countries and current topics in Africa. Start by selecting a specific region, country or topic. Due to the large quantity of information available, it is wise to be as specific as possible regarding the desired information. Reviewed by Masataka Kasai, 4/23/02.

Africa Timelines

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides a good overview of historical time periods in African History. Start by going to the Ancient Africa section. Once here, visitors can access information about human evolution and origins in Africa. In addition, links to literature and film are available and aide in the teaching of each historical period Be aware of the fact that this site is divided into five parts beginning with Ancient Africa and ending with Post-Independence Africa and Contemporary Trends. Embedded within each part are a plethora of links which provide additional resources and information about Africa’s rich and diverse history.

Africa Today: An Atlas of Reproducible Pages (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is an excellent resource that contains a wide selection of reproducible maps on environmental, demographic, geographic and political issues relevant to the study of Africa. In addition, it includes separate country maps. This product is available from World Eagle Publishers .

Media Type: Media

Africa Update Vol. VII, no. 3 (Summer 2000) Nigerian Culture and Society

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site has articles by Dr. Olayemi Akinwumi on “Women Entrepreneurs in Nigeria”: Notes on the Yoruba ‘Alajapa’ and ‘Alarobo’. Africa Update is the newsletter of Central Connecticut State’s African Studies Program. Reviewed by John Metzler 7/2002.

Africa Web Links: University of Pennsylvania African Studies

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is a mega-site with a plethora of links to annotated resources related to the study of Africa. The site is organized around general topics and or themes. Start by going to the Story of Africa . For novice students of African history, they can access and learn about the events and characters that shaped Africa’s history from an African perspective. Also of interest is the K-12 Resource Link . This link provides educators with an annotated listing of online resources useful for teaching and learning about Africa in the classroom. For the more experienced student of African history, Africa Research Central is a good place to start if interested in primary sources relevant to Africa. A searchable database allows visitors to locate primary source repositories in Africa, Europe and North America. Be aware of languages used to execute searches at the African Research Central link. The site is accessible to both English and French speaking patrons.

Africa World Press and Red Sea Press (Publisher & distributor of books from Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because these two publishers offer books from Africa that can provide primary sources, fiction and other excellent sources of African content. See sections on African women, children’s lit, history and specific countries.

Africa World Press Guide

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is the electronic version of the print guide – Africa World Press. The Africa World Press Guide is an annotated guide to educational resources from and about Africa. The resources are organized according to 28 topics. Examples of topics include reviews of literature focusing on African issues, conflict resolution, the environment, music, women’s issues and much more. Originally reviewed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, African Studies Outreach Program .

Africa’s 100 Best books of the 20th Century

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site is a showcase of print and electronic resources on Sub-Saharan Africa from the Zimbabwe International Book Fair. Start by visiting the Links section in order to access information on other international book fairs, library and research-related sites, publishing & book selling sites, literature & cultural sites, etc.

Africa, (1984)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this eight part series by Basil Davidson unfold on location all over Africa, showing life as it is today. Additionally, this series contains archive footage and dramatized reconstructions. Start by viewing Part 5, The Bible and the Gun, which looks at the impact on African society of three different groups; slave traders, missionaries and colonialists. Part 6 explores This Magnificent African Cake as it traces the major developments of African history between the 1800′s and 1945. This part looks at the different ways colonial rule was established and the emergence of nationalist movements, focusing on Senegal, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and Mozambique. Be aware of the fact that there are two programs per cassette (each program is one hour long.)

Media Type: Media

Africa: Beyond the Myths (1992)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it serves as source for discussing commonly held misconceptions about Africa. This series of two programs, “A First Look at Africa” (for grades 2-4) and “A Closer Look at Africa” (for grades Slavic and Eastern Europe-8) provides students with an overview of the continent while also discussing and dispelling stereotypes about Africa. Contact the Ohio Valley International Council at Ohio University if interested in borrowing this video.

Media Type: Media

Africa: Education, Communication and Development

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an online resource for obtaining an annotated directory of sites on distance education in Africa. Strength(s) of site — easy to navigate, loads quickly. Start by visiting the Distance Education Institutions in Africa . This link provides additional annotated directories relevant to distance education on the continent.

Africa: It’s Not A Country

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this online resource provides access to a variety of lesson plans specifically targeted for elementary grades. The site explores several different themes related to the study of Africa. Included under each theme are lesson plans created by pre-service teachers who seek to debunk the many myths and stereotypes surrounding the study of Africa. Many of the lesson plans are easy to follow and can be easily adapted to accommodate various learning situations. Start by visiting the African Stereotypes: Lets Be Fair section. The goal of these lessons are to help students recognize stereotypes as it relates to Africa. Be aware of the fact that the print on some pages may be difficult to read. Also many of the reference/resource links are not working.

Africa: Myth and Reality

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this article reports on the Third International Social Studies Conference held in Nairobi, Kenya during 1994. The article discusses democracy, educational reform efforts and the importance of tourism to the Kenyan economy. The author asserts that U.S. teachers must use accurate and non-stereotypical instructional materials in teaching about Africa.

Citation: Brown, Barbara. (1994). Social Education, 58(6), 374-375.

Media Type: Book

Africa: Southern Region, Africa: Northern Region, Africa: Central and East Regions and Africa: Western Region

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because These four videos published by the Encyclopedia Britannica Educational Corporation provide good visual images of the geography of the African continent. They could be used by upper intermediate through high school students. Contact the Ohio Valley International Council at Ohio University if interested in borrowing this video series. Be aware of of the fact that the series was produced in the late 1980s and therefore political information on the situation in Southern Africa as well as other regions may not be current.

Media Type: Media

AfricaFiles

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because AfricaFiles is a production of volunteers around the world working to promote human rights and economic justice in Africa.  On this site, you can find current research archives, podcasts, news stories, or search information by topic on the Africa InfoServe.  This site contains appropriate materials for elementary and secondary education.  Start with Africa Research for educational resources.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

AfricaFocus Bulletin

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this website features high-quality analysis and progressive advocacy on African issues, with particular attention to priority issues affecting the entire continent, such as HIV/AIDS, refugees and conflict, debt and trade, and democratization. The heart of the website consists of issues of AfricaFocus Bulletin. Both web and bulletin are independent, and not subsidized by any government, foundation, or organization. Articles provide concise but thorough summaries of a given issue, with key excerpts from media, government and other press releases and documents. Start by going to the home page to browse current issues, or to choose a country and search the archives.

African American

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a documentary set in Ohio’s Central State University, interviewing African and African-American students and examining attitudes and stereotypes held by each about the other. Wright State University film student Askia Holloway recently won best documentary at the Atlanta Independent Film Festival for the film. The 23-minute documentary deals with intra-racial prejudice by viewing the tensions between American-born blacks and blacks from Africa. Holloway interviewed several students from Central State University, a historic black college near Dayton, for the film. African American also has been honored as the Best Regional Short Film at the Cincinnati World Cinema Independent Film Festival and Best Ohio Short Film at the Cleveland International Film Festival. The director can be contacted at hollowayfilms@yahoo.com.

Media Type: Media

African American Institute, Washington, D.C.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it seeks to promote an understanding of Africa in America and expand educational and professional opportunities for Africans. Strength(s) of site include: easy to navigate, pages load quickly. Start by clicking on African Perspectives . Patrons will have access to reports and online discussions relevant to the examination of U.S. policy toward Africa.

African Beginnings (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a picture book which introduces various African kingdoms and events, including several in Ghana. This informative picture book is a handsomely illustrated overview of Africa’s ancient empires. Readers learn that Egypt was once ruled by the Kushites, whose kings were shown in temple and tomb depictions as black pharaohs. There is just enough information in the text to leave children curious to learn more about these ancient empires, and the extensive bibliography points to more detailed sources.

Citation: Benson, James & Kathleen

Media Type: Book

African Books Collective (Publisher & distributor of books from Africa)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because African Books Collective is owned and governed by 63 independent African publishers. It seeks to strengthen indigenous African publishing through accessibility to African scholarship and culture. It is non-profit making, and supported by government agencies and development organizations. See sections on folklore, children’s books, literature, history, law, humor, and many other topics. Start by clicking on children’s books .

African Diaspora

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site seeks to provide information concerning Black World History, with a particular focus on Black Canadian history and perspectives. The site also contains a search query feature. Typing in “Nigeria” provided access to a brief introduction to the political climate in Nigeria as well as music recordings of famous Nigerian artists and musicians. Other links of interest include Black World Events – a timeline of important events which happened to Black people around the world, and Nature in Africa – provides information about plant and animal life in Africa. Lastly, general information is available about such countries as The Republic of Ghana and The Republic of Gambia. The information includes a brief introduction of the country’s history, links to government, tourism, currency etc. Start by visiting the link titled African Diaspora . Once here, visitors are encouraged to think about such questions as What is the African Diaspora? and What is Reparations? Links are provided for video clips and original recordings of former slaves telling in their own words about their life in bondage. Be aware of of the fact that visitors must register and login to access the Reparation Discussion Forum and the Live Webcast.

African Governments on the Internet

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides website references for national and local government offices, political parties, ministries, and other country-specific information. Be aware of the fact that some countries will have numerous websites while others will not.

African History

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site serves as an archive to articles and essays on African History. A plethora of topics and resources are available. Examples include links to current event articles on former political leaders in Africa, primary sources, books, museums, military history and the list goes on. Start by visiting the Era: Colonialism link. Visitors can access articles and other resources related to the colonial experience on the continent. In addition, visitors can perform regional searches as well. Each regional link provides a brief introduction to the region with additional links to key countries in that particular region. Other links of interest include slavery of Africans, and timelines in African History. A good resource for obtaining general and country specific information.

African History in Documents

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it covers five hundred years of history. Volume I: West African History begins with the writings of travelers like Ibn Battuta, Leo Africanus, Mungo Park, Heinrich Barth as well as many others. The Trans-Sahara and Cross Atlantic slave trade are a central concern of the book. The French and British colonial periods are scrutinized. Modern times are examined in the texts of Nnamidi Azikiwe, Leopold Senghor, Sekou Toure, and Kwame Nkrumah. Special emphasis is put on original African texts about political traditions, independence movements after World War II, the law and other themes of social and political history. Volume II: Eastern African History covers three thousand years of African history, beginning with reports about the ancient kingdoms of Ethiopia and Kush, ancient and medieval trade routes, including China’s discovery of Africa, the history of the East Coast, the appearance of Indian and white settlers, merchants and colonists. Modern times are considered in the documents of Jomo Kenyatta, Tom Mboya, Milton Obote, and Julius Nyerere. Volume III: Central and South Africa begins with the kingdoms of the Congo in the 14th and 15th centuries, and their histories. This volume analyses the influence and pressures of the Portuguese, the Catholic Church and slave traders on these blossoming African states. The South African section contains documents about indigenous people and the first Dutch settlement in the 17th century, including the introduction of slavery, conflicts between settlers and British missionaries as well as warfare with the indigenous states. The new political era includes the early writings of Nelson Mandela.

Citation: R.O. Collins (2001). Markus Wiener Publishers.

Media Type: Book

African History in Maps

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its combination of historical maps and one page overviews of historical periods. The maps included in the text provide a comprehensive and accurate coverage of the the major themes in African history from AD 1000 to present. Each map is accompanied by a facing page of concise explanatory text. The contents of the text include information about Africa’s physical geography, its peoples, North-West and North-East Africa from the 11th to 14th centuries, West African state to about 1600, Empires and kingdoms in Central and Eastern Africa, European explorers and missionaries in West, Central and East Africa. the European Partition, and the New Africa. Be aware of the fact that this text is currently out of print with limited availability.

Citation: M. Kwamena-Poh, J. Tosh, R. Waller, and M. Tidy, M. (1982). Longman Group Limited.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

African Human Rights Resource Center of University of Minnesota (Illinois)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it serves as a collection of internet resources on human rights issues. Start by visiting the Africa Human Rights . Once here, visitors can access a variety of links focusing on human rights in Africa. Reviewed by Andre Patterson, 4/2002.

African Images (1984).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it details the vast diversity of wildlife found within each of Africa’s various habitats – forest, river, soda lake and Rift Valley, swamp and marsh, bush, grassland, and savanna and examines the way animals interact within these environments.

Citation: Dorcas MacClintock, pictures by Ugo Mochi. NY: Charles Scribner’s Sons

Media Type: Book

African Immigration: Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because It is part of a larger body of research entitled, In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience, this website provides a wealth of information, both quantitative and analytical, about recent African immigration to the U.S. The site provides an overview and statistics, as well as discussion of such issues as the Brain Drain, entrepreneurship, continuity and change in family life, religious communities, questions of identity and dual identity. The site also provides excellent images, maps, and other links, as well as lesson plans for the K12 level.

African Jim (1995. 51 min. Video/C 4008)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because made on the eve of apartheid’s inception, this is the first full length feature film made in South Africa with an all native African cast. Featuring top African singers and music of the 1950′s, this is a unique record of a lost era.

Media Type: Media

African Music Encyclopedia

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides rich introduction about African music, including a list of musical artists organized alphabetically by artists’ name or by country. It also offers links to general, country-specific information on all the countries of Africa. Be aware of the fact that there is a Glossary of African music terms, which will be useful to those new to the music in this region.

African Names: People and Places

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because its information on African names and the history of naming in Africa. It also discusses the colonial impact on naming, naming ceremonies in various societies, and the meanings of names. Good activities and games. Supplementary materials include pronunciation guide, list of African countries and capitals, current leaders as of the time of publication and official languages. Be aware of the fact that some information is outdated.

Citation: Louise Crane (1982). Available through the Center for African Studies at Illinois.

Media Type: Book

African National Congress

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides historical documents about the ANC movement from its incipient struggle against apartheid to its transition into the dominant political party of the modern South African state. Documents concerning conventions, speeches, and constitutions, affiliate organizations, major campaigns, and political trials are included. Photographs, international allies and responses, and biographies are also available.

African Odyssey Interactive

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this interactive site offers a listing of African art from around the world as well as a variety of educational resources. African Odyssey Interactive also features a section titled “Spinning Africa: Stories from Life”. This section invites teachers and students to share their own interpretation and understanding of African cultures through stories, music, dance, and other forms of creative expression.

African Organizations & Associations around the World (Michigan State)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides an annotated list of African organizations and associations. Start by clicking on the organization of interest for further exploration.

African Politics and Society: A Mosaic in Transformation

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its comprehensive examination of continuity and change in African politics and society from the pre colonial era to the present, with a particular focus on the post Cold War era (1989-present). Each chapter emphasizes the major themes of a topic through illustrative case studies. The range of case studies includes countries from all regions and colonial traditions of the African continent. Examples of topics explored are “Understanding the African Renaissance”, “Politics and Economics of the Pre colonial Independence Era (prior to 1884), “Political and Economic Impacts of Colonialism (1884-1951), and “Ethnicity and Class”. Each chapter concludes with a list of suggested recommended readings. A good source for understanding Africa’s political and economic development.

Citation: P. J. Schraeder (2000). Beford/St. Martin’s 2000, 2004

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

African Radio Stations

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because patrons can access radio stations and other media in several African countries namely Algeria, Benin, Egypt, Ghana, Kenya and Liberia. Also patrons can listen to music and the news. Elizabeth Akingbola Last Modified: 09/06/2004

African Story Magic (1992).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because in this twenty-seven minute video, a seven year old steps from the streets of Los Angeles into the Africa of his ancestors. Storytellers share six stories of wisdom and courage. Appropriate for elementary students. Narrated by Brock Peters.

Media Type: Media

African Studies Association

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an organization that seeks to bring together people with a scholarly and professional interest in Africa. Strength(s) of site — easy to navigate, provides information about the annual conference. Start by visiting the link titled “Publications” . Here visitors can find out about the publications available from the African Studies Association.

African Studies Center (at the University of Pennsylvania)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it is a vital and forward-looking center where researchers, students and cultural and business entities come to gain knowledge of contemporary and historical Africa. The site coordinates a wide range of course offerings in anthropology, demography, economics, history, language, literature, politics, religion, and sociology. Specialized issues are addressed through the University’s research programs, professional schools, and interdisciplinary centers. The geographic interests of Penn Africanists span the continent — including Francophone and Islamic countries — and extend to the African diaspora throughout the world.

African Timelines

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides a good overview of historical time periods in African History. The site is divided into five parts beginning with Ancient Africa and ending with Post-Independence Africa and Contemporary Trends. Embedded within each part are a plethora of links which provide additional resources and information about Africa’s rich and diverse history. Start by visiting the link titled Anti-Colonialism and Reconstruction . Here, visitors have access to a timeline concerning anti-colonial and reconstruction efforts on the continent. In addition, links to literature and film are available which can aide in the teaching of each historical period.

African Union

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this pan-African organization, founded in 1999, works for the integration and the advancement of its African member states in political, social, economic, and cultural areas. The organization fulfills the role of the previous Organization of African Unity. Headquartered in Abuja, Nigeria, the AU has taken significant initiatives particularly in the area of regional security and conflict.

African Voices

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because African Voices is a permanent exhibition that examines the diversity and global influence of Africa’s peoples and cultures over time. Included are historical and contemporary objects from the Museum’s collections, as well as commissioned sculptures, textiles, and pottery. Video interactive and sound stations provide selections from contemporary interviews, literature, proverbs, prayers, folk tales, songs, and oral epics. Navigation of the site is easy. Click on any of the scrolling themes located at the far right of the page. Start by clicking on the theme titled “History”, which examines Africa’s desire to rid itself of its colonial rulers. Also, using a timeline format, click on “Colonialism” to highlight key events during the first half of the 20th century that led to the independence of many African nations from their European colonizers.

African Wildlife Foundation (Environment)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site seeks to provide information about conserving African wildlife and its natural habitats. Start by reading any of the current news stories listed under the “News and Features” section. Reviewed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison African Studies Outreach Program .

African Women Resources (Michigan State) (Women’s Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it hosts a collection of links on African women and women’s rights/issues. Start by visiting the Great African Queens link. Once here, visitors can experience the power, the glory, the splendor, the greatness, the intelligence and the beauty of Great African Queens, the makers and creators of the world first known high civilizations.(Explanation provided by website). Be aware of the fact that some links are not working. Reviewed by Andre Patterson, 4/2002.

African Writers: Voices of Change (by University of Florida)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides access to short biographical pieces on Chinua Achebe, Ama Ata Aidoo, Ayi Kwei Armah, Buchi Emecheta, Bessie Head, Alex La Guma, Dambudzo Marechera, Ezekiel Mphahlele, Alan Paton, Okot P’Bitek, and Amos Tutuola. A substantial page for Francophone African poets in English translation is also now available, including brief biographical sketches as well as short excerpts from each author’s work. Lastly, the site also provides additional links for accessing resources about African literature.

africancraft.com

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site brings together african craftsman, artists, and designers, as well as artists influenced by african art. The site profiles artists and artistic techniques for both traditional and modern art forms. Start by going to the section on education to view detailed lesson plans on kente cloth weaving and other activities. The site also features an on-line shopping mall, with items that can be used for teaching such as adrinka stamps.

Africanet

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its country-specific information for visiting African countries. The information contained on the country-specific pages is rather basic – climate, a brief history of the country, currency, etc. The site promotes travel and tourism to and within Africa. Several of the countries mentioned are located in the eastern and southern regions of the continent. Start by by visiting the Safaris link . Here visitors can access information about safaris in Tanzania and other countries in Eastern and Southern Africa. Be aware of the fact that some of the links located on the page are not working – i.e. the Rhythm Africa link.

Africans and Their History

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this resource provides a concise and readable overview of African history. Chronicles Africa’s development from early times and its relationship to the world. This is a good resource for introducing young adult students to African history. Reviewed by Africa Access.

Citation: J.E. Harris (1987), (1998). New American Library/Mentor Books

Media Type: Book

Africans in America

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its dialogue with immigrant mothers and daughters from five African countries. Rahina Awini, an immigrant from Ghana, says, “American schools were difficult& a lot of White kids. They treated us bad. They didn”t treat us equally at all. When we were growing up in Ghana we were used to being treated equally. They didn’t accept us. It was because of our skin color.” Meet Rahina and twelve additional African immigrants living in the United States. They represent two generations of five families from five African countries: Ethiopia, Ghana, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda. See and hear them describe their acculturative stressors, coping mechanisms, identity development, and hopes for the future. The instructor’s manual includes maps and country of origin, demographic material, photographs of the participants, quotations from each participant, as well as discussion questions and reference material. This program is available for purchase for educational use from Films for the Humanities and Sciences. Please visit the company website at http://www.films.com or call toll free the customer service number at 1-800-257-5126.

Media Type: Media

Africare

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is the oldest and largest African-American private charitable organization devoted to humanitarian assistance in Africa. Africare works in 25 African nations, addressing needs in food security, agriculture, health and HIV/AIDS, water resources, basic education, microenterprise development, governance initiatives and emergency relief. Founded on the premise of African-Americans giving back to Africa, the organization’s board and staff are particularly diverse, and include such notables as Nelson Mandela as honorary chair of the board.

Afrique Francophone

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it is an excellent resource on French-speaking Africa, people, and culture. It links to literature, media, countries, and culture and music. Be aware of the fact that this online resource is written in French.

Afro@digital

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this video looks at the information technology revolution which has become a daily reality in many African countries where the Internet, mobile telephones and digital video cameras are being used with extraordinary creativity. Visits a marabout who explains he no longer replies by letter to questions but uses his mobile phone and email to transmit his advice. Another illustration of the digital revolution in Africa is the rise of internet cafes and cyber teahouses. In some towns in Senegal and the Congo, increasing numbers are connecting to internet using a laptop computer with a mobile phone. 2003. 53 min. Video/C 9692. Reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Afrol.com (Women’s Issues)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a source for obtaining regional specific news from Africa. In addition, articles are available on African women from various sources (UNICEF, World Bank, IPS, etc). Based in Oslo, Norway. Start by clicking on the Gender-Women link. Once here, visitors can access current news stories relevant to women in Africa. Reviewed by John Metzler, 7/2002.

AFWOSCHO (Women’s Issues)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it is a discussion group open to anyone who is interested in African women’s issues. Sponsored by the Association of African Women Scholars (AAWS), based at Indiana University, Indianapolis campus. To subscribe, send email to listserv@listserv.iupui.edu. Leave the subject area blank. In the Message area, put: subscribe afwoscho and your name. Start by clicking the Women link. Once here, visitors can access a variety of annotated links concerning issues of importance to women in Africa. Be aware of of the fact that some links may not be working, and that the website was last revised in 2001.

Agenda (Durban, South Africa) (Feminist Journal)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this an online quarterly feminist journal. The site contains a table of contents of recent issues. One can receive by email, a fact sheet on workshops, conferences, web sites, print publications, etc.

Akan Cultural Symbols Project

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides information about the art of the Akan people of Ghana and kente weaving. This project is designed as an educational resource to show the relationships between Akan visual arts and Akan verbal genres. It is also to show some aspects of the rich cultural heritage of the Akan of Ghana. Topics and materials included in this site are architecture, metal casting, wood carving, textiles and pottery. Be aware of the fact that sample lesson plans recommend purchase of CD of artistic slides from the site.

Akan Goldweights

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its rich collection of information and photos of Akan gold weights. The Akan people live in the southern part of Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire. The Akan gold weights exhibit animation, humor, and freedom of expression coupled with endless variety. Their details excite curiosity about their origins and meaning. Such inquiry is rewarding, because gold weight forms often reflect Akan history and life, from religion and politics to social behavior and responsibilities of the individual. Site also contains similar display of the Yoruba culture of Nigeria.

Ake: The Years of Childhood (1981).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is an autobiography of Nigeria’s Nobel laureate in literature, Wole Soyinka. He describes the subject in intimate and humorous detail from a very early age to age eleven. Soyinka, a playwright, poet, novelist, teacher, and activist delights us with a remarkable memoir of his growing up in the urban Christian, Yoruba home of his parents in western Nigeria during the 1930s and 1940s. This book will be a classic in its genre and gives insight into life in contemporary Nigeria. For the non-specialist, it is a more accessible piece of literature than his novels and it is a good compliment to other African literature that gives readers a sense of rural community life. Soyinka brings to life his adventures and delights as a three year old, the vitality and busy life of the compound of a school headmaster, describes his siblings, extended family, and his parents (especially his mother, whom he refers to as “Wild Christian).” This very Nigerian autobiography provides memories so that readers can identify with the universal childhood experience.

Citation: Soyinka, Wole. Random House.

Media Type: Book

Akhet Egyptology (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it offers interactive access to Egyptian history. Topics and materials include Akhenaten & Amarna, Tutankhamun, mummy masks, art of the afterlife, grave goods, tombs & temples, sculpture, mythology, clickable mummy, the king list, Scottish Egyptology, museums & collections, Akhet bookshop. Start by using the Clickable Mummy link. Click on different parts of the mummy to learn about mummification.

Akhet-Aten Home Page (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it is a good resource for Egyptian history, Amarna period. Re-creation link. Topics and materials include introduction, Akhenaten, Nefertiti, Aten, Akhetaten, art, literature, digging, glossary, new & cool, bookshop, discussion, events, postcards, web links, references, for students, for teachers, re-creation, and FAQ. This site also has updates on current events around the country related to Egypt. Start by visiting for students , for teachers , and re-creation links. Be aware of the fact that this site was last updated in 2000.

Alan Paton’s Beloved Country ([1999?] 54 min. Video/C 7677)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Alan Paton — teacher, author, politician — was one of South Africa’s most remarkable sons. This documentary reveals the man and the complex relationship he had with his country. Repelled by the racism he saw in the homeland he loved, his Christian conscience propelled him into the world of political action. He wrote Cry the Beloved Country, the novel that had the most profound impact in the world-wide struggle against apartheid. This documentary relates the author to his work and includes Paton reading extracts from his novel.

Media Type: Media

All Africa.com (Women’s News)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this online source provides very current news stories from a variety of African news sources about and for women. Start by clicking on the country of interest as it pertains to women in Africa. Reviewed by John Metzler, 7/2002.

Allafrica.com

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this online resource is one of the best electronic distributors of news on Africa. Provides a choice between updated regional or country specific news. Start by exploring resources on the region or country under study. Be aware of the fact that some news stories are available in French.

America, Spare Somalia for God’s Sake

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it is an insightful source of information and opinions on Somalia. Please review the following information: Nuruddin Farah, January 2, 2002 in the Monitor, Kampala. A version of this opinion column by the renowned Somali novelist also appeared in the New York Times on January 9 under the title “Somalia is No Hideout for Bin Laden.”

Americas: The Challenging Face of Latin America and the Caribbean (1995) (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book is the text version of the video series by the same name. Its chapters deal with a variety of contemporary social issues in Latin America.

Citation: Winn, Peter. University of California Press, Berkley.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

Amoko and Efua Bear (1989)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is a picture book about Amoko, a little girl living in Ghana, who takes her favorite teddy bear everywhere that she goes and is heartbroken when she thinks he’s lost.

Citation: Appiah, Sonia

Media Type: Book

Anansi and the Moss-Covered Rock (1993)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it tells the story of Anansi the Spider, who uses a strange moss-covered rock in the forest to trick all the other animals, until Little Bush Deer decides he needs to learn a lesson. The text is rhythmic, nicely building suspense to the inevitable conclusion. Stevens’ complementary, colorful illustrations add detail, humor, and movement to the text. Here, Anansi is portrayed as a large eight-legged arachnid; his expression is in his motion. The other animals are almost realistic, although with facial expressions that are characteristic of the artist’s work. This new picture book Anansi tale will be welcomed by all trickster fans.

Citation: Kimmel, Eric A.

Media Type: Book

Anansi Does the Impossible (1997)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it tells the story of how Anansi and his wife outsmart the Sky God and win back the beloved folktales of their people. Retold from Aardema’s The Sky God Stories (Coward, 1960; o.p.), the tale rollicks along at a rhythmic merry pace, full of descriptive ideophones (sounds that express movement or emotion). The lively narrative is perfect for reading aloud, and the inclusion of Aso is a particularly nice touch. Desimini’s textured collages portray the spider couple as cheeky and cherubic in their boldly patterned clothing. The extravagant, vibrant illustrations fill the pages and complement the text beautifully. The depictions of the defiant Anansi confronting the Sky God, a gigantic, disembodied head, are particularly effective.

Citation: Aardema, Verna

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

Anansi, the Spider: A Tale from the Ashanti (1972)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this picture book uses Asante art forms to tell the story of Kwaku Anansi and his six sons. This story, retold and illustrated by Gerald McDermott, relates the tale of father Anansi and his six spider sons. When Anansi sets out on a dangerous journey and gets into all sorts of trouble, each son does one thing to help, and all their efforts together save their father. This profound story reaches children of many ages; younger ones see it as an exciting rescue story, but older children are intrigued by the larger themes of cooperation and “the whole being more than its parts.”

Citation: McDermott, Gerald, Henry Holt

Media Type: Book

Anansi. Rabbit Ears. (?)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because in this thirty minute video, Oscar-winner Denzel Washington narrates two hilarious stories from Jamaica where Anansi outsmarts the prideful snake. Reggae hit makers UB 40 provide the decidedly Jamaican score. An introductory animated segment shows the link between this Jamaican Anansi and his African origin. Appropriate for early elementary grades.

Media Type: Media

Ancestor Tree (1994)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is a story of an old man Nna-nna and the children who eagerly come to listen to his wonderful stories every morning. The old man gets sick and he is sad because he has no children and there will therefore be no one to plant an Ancestor Tree in the Forest of the Ancestors when he dies. Only someone who has living children can have an Ancestor Tree planted for them. The children promise to plant an Ancestor Tree for him. After Nna-nna’s death the children convince the Village Council to plant an Ancestor Tree for Nna-nna. One of the elders says, “You children have taught us that customs have a beginning, customs can change, and sometimes, customs come to an end. We have decided to end one custom and begin another.” Apart from being a good story, The Ancestor Tree provides a corrective to the view of traditions in African societies as static. Here we see tradition evolving as is always the case.

Citation: Echewa, T. Obinkaram. New York: Dutton/Lodestar.

Media Type: Book

Ancient Egypt (1971. 52 min. Video/C 5.).

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it shows examples of ancient Egyptian art and architecture while briefly outlining Egypt’s history. Traces the development of Egyptology and includes interviews with Egyptologists and archaeologists currently working in Egypt. Originally reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Annual Editions: Global Issues 09/10. (2009).

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because new editions each year contain collections of 30-40 up to date articles from scholars and the world press that examine the most important global issues facing the planet.  The book has a world map, a glossary, a topic guide, and a list of related websites. This is one of many Annual Editions series. Others (see list on the Annual Editions website) are also relevant to specific issues as well as regional studies.

Citation: Jackson, Robert M. (editor). Guilford, CT: McGraw-Hill/Dushkin. http://www.dushkin.com

Media Type: Book

Antiquarian Maps of Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a large collection of maps. Strength of site – the map collections are geographically comprehensive and consist of over 200,000 map sheets, 3,000 atlases, and 900 reference books. Items in the Map Collection do not normally circulate. Items from a small collection of wall maps may be checked out for short term or semester use in classrooms. When other materials are needed briefly for classroom presentation, exhibition loan, or similar purposes, special arrangements can often be made with the curator. The Map Collection Library has a photocopy machine capable of making black and white copies of sheet maps up to 36″ x 48″ in size. For color copies of non-rare materials, items may be checked out for reproduction at a local, commercial printing service. Maps in bound volumes may, at the discretion of the curator, be copied on a standard photocopier. Arrangements for photography — prints, slides, etc., — can be made with the Yale Audio Visual Center. Start by clicking on the Maps of Africa link. Here visitors can access an annotated bibliography of maps of Africa. Also, under “what’s new”, check out past exhibit “Eye of the Beholder:Western Maps of Africa”

Art and Life in Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because the site provides an introduction and guide to the related CD-ROM project. Online resources include profiles of 107 African cultures and 27 sub-Saharan African countries, a databank of 47 lesson plans for K-12 teachers, and a Teacher’s Forum with a discussion group and chat room.

Asante: The Gold Coast (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides a well-written and historically accurate account of the Asante kingdom. Gives myths of origin of the Akan peoples, early history of Akan clans and explains how they came to unite in more recent centuries especially during the British invasion. Photos are rich and helpful in picturing the historical periods. For middle school and up.

Citation: Koslow, Philip. Chelsea House.

Media Type: Book

Asinamali! ( 1995. 66 min. Video/C 4012)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because This play, commissioned by the BBC, is written, directed, and acted by “The Committee Artists”, a South African performing group. Five prisoners in a South African jail recall–through word, song, and dance–the events which have brought them there. “Asinamali” means we have no money. The men portrayed in “Asinamali” have been victimized by the laws, police brutality, unemployment, and humiliation of apartheid. Based on the play by Mbongeni Ngema.

Media Type: Media

Association of Concerned African Scholars

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an organization of scholars concerned with the policies of the U.S. government towards Africa. Start by visiting the link titled Additional Resources. Here, visitors have access to other organizations concerned with national and international issues relevant to Africa.

At The Tomb of Tutankhamen

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its well done interactive site on the site of Tutankhamen. Information on the IMAX movie, Mysteries of Egypt, can also be found here. Teacher materials. Topics and materials include background information on the site of Tutankhamen including correspondence and author information. Written in first-person story-form are the first three days of Williams’ journey into the tomb. Photos are included. Start by looking at the activity guides(under Links and Resources) which include archaeology, architecture, art, geography, math & science, and writing to learn how you can integrate Egypt across the curriculum.This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas.

Azikiwe, Dr. Nnamdi

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides an account, in four parts of the life of Nigeria’s first President, Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe. The site also provides historical photographs of Dr. Azikiwe. For links to parts 2-4 go to the following web address:http://www.greatepicbooks.com/epics/.

BBC News

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides comprehensive news coverage of events around the world.  It is easily organized by region (see tabs at top on homepage), type of media (video, podcast, blog, etc.), and issues.   Because BBC has affiliate stations around the world, broadcasts can be found in multiple languages.  This site is appropriate for grades 7-12. Many selections provide excellent maps, video and audio presentations. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

 

BBC News: World Edition: Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site offers coverage of current events about Africa from the BBC News. Good for current events about African countries and related stories. Easy to navigate with good, reliable links. Start by clicking on African Perspective . African Perspective is a weekly audio program that takes an in-depth look at life in Africa.

Beyond the Fire: Teen Experiences of War

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this outstanding website gives students the opportunity to examine the impact of conflicts throughout the world, with focus on such African countries as Somalia, Sudan, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. In addition to the audio interviews with teenage refugees now living in the US, the site provides well-developed lesson plans for classrooms to develop understanding and empathy on teenage refugees, child soldiers, and other issues. Students can click on individual students’ stories, follow a time line, and read background articles on various conflicts.

Black Hawk Down (newspaper series, November-December, 1997) (Somalia)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides access to newspaper articles which focus on the motion picture Black Hawk Down, the American helicopter operation in Somalia in 1993. Start by browsing through the “Analysis” and “Background” sections at the top right corner of the index page, with an analytical article by Mark Bowden.

Black Man’s Cry (1992)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Fela Kuti, one of Nigeria’s most controversial and unique musicians, dubs his sound, “Afrobeat.” In this recording, as in others, he incorporates elements of West Africa highlife, James Brown-style funk, jazz and traditional Yoruba rhythms. He combines intense often-political messages with call-and-response vocals. Anikulapo-Kuti, Fela. (sound recording) An audiocassette consisting of six songs.

Media Type: Media

Bopha! = Arrest! (1995. 59 min. Video/C 4006)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its portrayal of the play, Bopha!, which depicts South Africa’s dreaded black police force, the tool of apartheid. Through the play the audience sees the reality and effects of South Africa’s apartheid. Includes additional live footage of the black force in action. A classic of the South African township theatre movement of the 1980′s. The Earth Players production of Percy Mtwa’s Bopha! was produced at the Market Theatre, Johannesburg, South Africa. Start by Information about purchasing videos or video distributors should be directed to Ann Moen (amoen@library.berkeley.edu) or Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)

Media Type: Media

Boston University’s African Studies Center’s Outreach Program

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of Africa by providing information and educational materials for schools, libraries and museums. Strength of site — The Outreach Program houses a resource library open to the general public. The library’s collection circulates many materials that will be of interest to classroom teachers. The curriculum guides and lesson plans in the collection cover a wide variety of topics ranging from history, to literature to country specific units. Audio-visual resources may be borrowed through the mail while print materials are generally only available to visitors of the library. The library also offers two traveling kits Ghana Resource Kit and the Kenya Resource Kit. These kits include photo sets and curriculum guides. The traveling kits may be borrowed locally from the African Outreach Center or shipped nationally through the Boston Children’s Museum. The museum’s telephone number is 1-800-370-5487. Start by requesting the “What Do We Know About Africa?” video. This thirty-minute video discusses and dispels the stereotypes associated with the continent and provides a general overview of the continent’s geography, culture and history.

Breaking the Cycle (Africa: Search for Common Ground; 2.) (1997. 26 min. Video/C 5345)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Part of a series profiling formal efforts by various Sub-Saharan African countries to peacefully resolve contemporary conflicts. Examines the issue of domestic violence were we meet abusers and victims working to break the vicious cycle in South Africa’s Alexandra Township.

Media Type: Media

Bride Price (1976)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this book is a tragic novel of love and rebellion set in Nigeria in the 1950s. The Bride Price is both an easy and enlightening read. Buchi Emecheta deftly captures the girl’s adolescent fragility and power as she struggles to carve out her identity amongst the dictates of patriarchy, which her mother upholds to the point of betraying her own vulnerable daughter. Recommended for young adult readers.

Citation: Emecheta, Buchi. Braziller.

Media Type: Book

Bridge, Institute of Development Studies (IDS) (Gender Issues)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this online resource provides reports, country gender profiles, etc. Has the full text of their quarterly, Development and Gender in Brief. Has some full text reports in Adobe PDF format such as BRIDGE On-Line Reports, 1998, 127pp. Start by clicking on Development and Gender In Brief (Issue 14). This issue is devoted to examine how the ideas of citizenship can promote gender equity. Be aware of the fact that this online resource is available in English , French and Spanish. In addition, the documents can be accessed in a html, pdf or word format. Reviewed by John Metzler, 7/2002.

Building Community West African Style

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it serves as an introduction to West African culture for both teachers and students who have little to no background knowledge of Africa. The unit provides teachers and students with a conceptual framework for learning more about West Africa. Major themes explored include “Creating Communities”, ” Geography, History and Community”, “How an African Community Works”, and African Arts in the Community. The unit consists of eighteen lessons arranged according to the themes above, a description of the slides included with the unit, recommended resources such as books and other materials on Africa.

Citation: B. Stanford (1992). Published by the Center for Teaching International Relations, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208.

Media Type: Book

Business Day (Johannesburg)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an online edition of South Africa’s main financial newspaper. Has stock exchange news, back issues which are keyword searchable, a Document archive will have publications such as the national budget, white papers, company announcements, has a free, for now, personalized news service, one can email questions about doing business in South Africa, there is a discussion forum, glossary of financial terms, an economic calendar of events, has audio and video files from its TV program.

CAIR – The Council on American Islamic Relations

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its coverage of current issues within the Muslim community of America. It also includes materials and information on Islam and Muslims for outreach purposes. Links to local chapter CAIR representatives and speaker information is also available. Start by reading the section on About Islam . There are also materials available for reasonable prices with information that can be used in the classroom or in curriculum development.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

California Newsreel

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because This website provides the latest in educational videos related to African American history, African cinema, race relations and diversity training. The Library of African Cinema is a video library arranged by topic. A few of the general topics explored are Gender and Women’s Studies, Francophone Africa, Political and Economic Development, Anthropology and Folklore, Health Issues and South Africa. In addition, the site provides a concise annotation of each film/video. Some films/videos are available in French and Portuguese. Information about pricing and policies is available at the site, and high schools qualify for discounts. Start by going to Francophone African Films . Here visitors can read additional information about newly released films which focus on Francophone Africa. Or click on Suitable for High School Use . Be aware of the fact that several of the films/videos are available in other languages – French or Portuguese.

CARE in Kenya

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides basic information about Kenya and describes the CARE projects in Kenya. Be aware of the fact that Users may also key in “Kenya” at the homepage of http://www.careusa.org/ to check out more related information about Kenya.

Changing This Country: The Testimony of Four South African Workers (1988. 58 min. Video/C 1265)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a narrative of the life and political activism of four workers in Port Elizabeth, a heavily industrialized city on the southern coast of South Africa , in 1987. Subtitles when a speaker uses a language other than English.

Media Type: Media

Channel Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is an International short-wave radio service operated by the South African Broadcasting Corp. Visitors to this site can read news stories in English, French, Portuguese, Chinyanja, Silozi and Swahili. Has continent wide news and the broadcast schedule. For those with sound cards/speakers/Real Player you can listen to the news from Johannesburg, see SABC TV news such as the opening of the South African Parliament (transmission may not be very good), or listen to music. I recommend beginning with Africa Perspective. This is an in-depth discussion program with experts sharing their views on political, economic, cultural and social events happening on the continent.

Chiefs and Strongmen (Struggle for Democracy). (1989. 57 min. Video/C 1888)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this program looks closely at three African nations where western-style democracy has not taken root; Nigeria, Zimbabwe, and the Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

Media Type: Media

Favorite Icon

Child Soldiers

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, March 3, 2010

This UNICEF page describes how child soldiers are being integrated back into society in Chad.  There are also links on the right side for additional information and articles related to the situation of child soldiers in Chad.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Child Soldiers-Coalition to Stop Their Use

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this website provides an overview of the issues surrounding child soldiers in such countries as Sudan, Uganda, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, the DRC and elsewhere. The organization’s goal is to prevent the recruitment and use of children as soldiers, to secure their demobilisation, and to ensure their rehabilitation and reintegration into society. Start by going to the link resources for schools for information geared more to children. The coalition is developing lesson plans on this issue.

Children of Apartheid ( 1987. 49 min. Video/C 1263)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is a film about young people in South Africa in 1987 hosted by Walter Cronkite. Interviews with black and white youth, including Zindzi Mandela and Roxanne Botha, daughters of Nelson Mandela and President P.W. Botha. A look at the country’s troubled present and at those who will shape its future.

Media Type: Media

City Press (Johannesburg)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an online edition of the print Sunday paper aimed at an urban black readership. Nearly half the paper’s readers are from Gauteng Province. The newspaper was first established in 1982 as Golden City Press and was the first national Sunday newspaper aimed at the Black market.

Coalition on Violence Against Women (COVAW) – Kenya

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is a membership-based non-partisan, secular, feminist network of individuals and organizations who are committed to eradicating violence against women. Be aware of the information on COVAW available at: http://www.covaw.or.ke/html/programmes.html

Coastweek.com (Mombasa)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it is the online edition of the weekly print newspaper. The site has information related to news, sports, entertainment, weather etc. Start by visiting the Headlines section to know more about the current events in Kenya from a local perspective.

Cold Water (1987).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because in this video international students share their experiences in the United States. They discuss the nature of U.S. culture and their process of adjustment to a new culture. Contact the African Studies Center at Boston University if interested in borrowing this video.

Media Type: Media

Colonial Africa: Films from British Central Africa, 1940s-1960s.

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its practical format of short feature films: comedies and documentary films produced in British Central Africa from the 1940s to 1960. Start by viewing these films in chronological order as they are presented in the contents: l. Lux toilet soap commercial (Container title: Mary’s lucky day) (b&w, si. with music, 11 min) — 2. The box / Central African Film Unit (1948, col., si., 22 min.) — 3. New acres / Central African Film Unit ; director, Henry Berriff ; producer, Dick Rayner (b&w, sd., 14 min.) — 4. We were primitive / Southern Rhodesia Information Service (1947, b&w, sd, 19 min.) — 5. Five messengers / Central African Film Unit (1948, col., si., 31 min.) — 6. Freedom from fear / Central African Film Unit (1960, b&w, sd., 15 min.) — 7. Rhodesia and Nyasaland news / Central African Film Unit (b&w, sd., 10 min.). 122 min.

Media Type: Media

Colonial History

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is a mega-site with a large number of links to other sites on African colonial history. Start by visiting the American Colonization Society, Library of Congress Exhibit section. The U.S. Library of Congress holds the records of the American Colonization Society which established Liberia. The exhibit descriptions provide historical background on this period. The Colonization section is part of the African-American Mosaic exhibit. Another interesting link related to the theme of colonialism in Africa is Dangerous Liaisons: Colonial Concubinage in Eritrea (1890-1941). The full text of this paper which is available in PDF format examines the relationship between Italian men and their African concubines during Italy’s colonial rule of Eritrea between 1890-1941. Be aware of the fact that some links may not be working.

Colors of Ghana (1999)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it explores the different colors found in Ghana?s history, culture and landscape. Colors of Ghana is a delightful introduction to a plethora of facts about Ghana. The book starts with a solid introduction about the country: flora and fauna, borders, population, ancient and modern history and languages. It then goes on to enlighten the reader using ten colors: gold, white, orange, gray, green, black, tan, blue, brown, and silver. Each color is used to introduce various cultural, geographical, historical and other aspects of Ghana.

Citation: Littleford, Holly

Media Type: Book

Cora Connection

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Cora Connections provides an introduction to the music of the Mandinka people of West Africa including information on the land, the local instruments, including the harp-lute, kora and the ancient African lute, ngoni, as well as the Mandinka culture.

Corridors of Freedom (1987. 51 min. Video/C 1047)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it focuses on economic interdependence and collective self reliance of the Southern African states in the framework of the Southern African development coordination.

Media Type: Media

Cross Cultural Collaborative

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Cross Cultural Collaborative, Inc. is a non-profit educational organization that promotes cultural exchange and understanding. Artists and educators from Ghana and the US make up the board and staff of the organization. Their programs bring together artists of different generations and cultures, encouraging them to get to know each other through the language of art. CCC, Inc. invites artists and scholars from all over the world to work with Ghanaians on collaborative projects that range from mosaic walls to adire cloth to documentary films. Start by looking at
workshop descriptions to see the descriptions of past and future workshops being given at CCC’s center in a suburb of Accra. A teacher’s workshop is being planned for 2006. You can also look at video clips of adrinka printmaking and other activities.

Cry Freedom (1987. 157 min. Video/C 999:226)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because as this film stars Denzel Washington and Kevin Kline, it is based on books Biko and Asking for Trouble by Donald Woods. Director, Richard Attenborough. It is a story of South African Black activist Stephen Biko and liberal White newspaper editor Donald Woods who risks his own life to bring Biko’s message to the world.

Media Type: Media

Cry, The Beloved Country (1995. 106 min. Video/C 999:1467)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because directed by Darrell Roodt, with actors like James Earl Jones, Richard Harris, Vusi Kunene, Leleti Khumalo, Charles S. Dutton, this is a story of two fathers living in South Africa, a black minister and a white farmer, whose lives are bound together by mutual tragedy. Based on the novel of the same title by Alan Paton.

Media Type: Media

Cultural Comparisons Through Literature

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it makes use of African autobiographies to compare cultural experiences and break down some of the pervasive stereotypes about Africa. Consists of suggested readings for different age groups along with lesson plan guidance.

Cultural Orientation Resource Center

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this Center, part of the Georgetown University-affiliated Center for Applied Linguistics, provides cultural profiles and other cross-cultural materials for a variety of immigrant groups, including Liberian, Somali, Somali-Bantu, and Sudanese. The materials are for use by refugee resettlement workers, both overseas and in the U.S., who are assisting in the resettlement of refugees to the U.S. The site also provides materials that describe and explain the refugee resettlement process, and exercises to explore cultural identity, workplace norms, family roles, and other issues affecting refugees.

Cutting to the Essence, Shaping for the Fire

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is an experimental online catalog for an exhibit of Yoruba and Akan art. This website includes photographs of a variety of pieces along with their histories. It presents its catalog in three sections: “The Doorway,” which begins on this page and includes an “Introductory Essay,” and other background on the exhibit;
“Cutting to the Essence,” an illustrated essay-exhibit by Michael Conner on Yoruba art in wood and metal; and
“Shaping for the Fire,” a similar exploration of Akan goldweights by Martha Ehrlich.

Death and the King’s Horseman (1987).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book is based on a real incident, this riveting play reveals the power of Yoruba culture and cautions against the hasty imposition of foreign values. It is seen as a good introduction to African thought and tradition. While it is frequently read, however, the play is seldom performed outside of Africa. Soyinka himself has directed important American productions, in Chicago in 1976 and at Lincoln Center in New York in 1987, but these productions were more admired than loved. Although respected by critics, Soyinka’s plays are challenging for Westerners to perform and to understand, and they have not been popular successes. Death and the King Horseman is considered by many to be among the best of Wole Soyinka’s plays, which number more than a dozen. In awarding Soyinka the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1986, the Swedish Academy drew special attention to Death and the King

Citation: Soyinka, Wole. Hill and Wang.

Media Type: Book

Delta Force (1995, 54 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this video chronicles events in the mid-1990s when the Ogoni people of southwestern Nigeria stepped up their efforts to oppose environmental pollution caused by the extraction of oil by Royal Dutch Shell in the Niger Delta. Nigeria’s military regime responded with extensive military operations, in particular targeting supporters of MOSOP (Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People) and its leader, the prominent writer Ken Saro-Wiwa who was executed for his efforts November 10, 1995. Catha Films Production for Channel Four (UK).

Media Type: Media

Delta Force (1995. Catha Films Production for Channel Four (UK), 54 minutes.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this video chronicles events in the mid-1990s when the Ogoni people of southwestern Nigeria stepped up their efforts to oppose environmental pollution caused by the extraction of oil by Royal Dutch Shell in the Niger Delta. Nigeria’s military regime responded with extensive military operations, in particular targeting supporters of MOSOP (Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People) and its leader, the prominent writer Ken Saro-Wiwa who was executed for his efforts November 10, 1995.

Media Type: Media

Favorite Icon

Democracy and Development in Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it traces the evolution and failure of development policies, including the IMF stabilization programs that have dominated international efforts on the continent. The author maintains that the authoritarian structure the African states inherited from colonial rule created a political environment that was hostile to development. The text explores alternatives that should be considered in an effort to improve economic and political stability on the continent.

Citation: C. Ake, (1996). The Brookings Institution.

Media Type: Book

Don’t Leave an Elephant to Go and Chase a Bird (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it tells the story of how Anansi Spider Man trades various items with the people he encounters, until he himself is distracted by a bird and ends up empty-handed.

Citation: Berry, James

Media Type: Book

Drum (1979).

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is an example of Nigerian folklore. The story focuses on a tortoise’s quest for power, which brings disharmony to the world.

Citation: Achebe, Chinua

Media Type: Book

Ear, the Eye and the Arm

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is a science fiction adventure story about three Zimbabwean children who are kidnapped in the year 2194. They pass through several situations that test their strength psychologically and physically and lead them to understand better their own values. Their parents hire three detectives, the Ear, the Eye and the Arm, to find the children. The book may capture the interest of middle school age children because it poses dangerous situations for the kidnapped children and shows how they use their ingenuity to escape. To a more mature reader, the book is very didactic, an allegory of what the author sees as Zimbabwe’s choices for its future.

Citation: Farmer, Nancy. (1994). New York: Orchards Books.

Media Type: Book

Earth Pulse

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 6, 2012

Recommended because this National Geographic site provides an immense amount of information regarding relationships of human population to world issues.  Especially useful for teaching geography (human, land, movement) and global issues.  Start with The Human Condition, then explore the menu bar on the left.  For primary students, click on the For Kids link.  Reviewed by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Earthlife Africa (Environment)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a South African environmental organization. The site includes information about signing up for an email list regarding environmental concerns in South Africa and fact sheets that can be downloaded. Start by clicking on the News link. Once here, visitors can access the latest news from Earthlife Africa Johannesburg’s campaigns. Reviewed by the
University of Wisconsin-Madison Afircan Studies Outreach Center.