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Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides a wealth of general information about Africa. From Algeria to Zimbabwe, the information and student activities provide an introduction to Africa’s rich cultural heritage. Each of the five geographic regions is explored along with African climate, vegetation, wildlife, literature, art and music. A good resource for introducing students in the early elementary grades to Africa.

Citation: Gillespie-Washington, Barbara Publisher: Teacher Created Materials: October 1, 1998

Media Type: Book

Africa – U.S. Same Scale Map Comparisons (1993)

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Recommended because it provides separate outlines of the U.S. and of each African country for photocopies and transparencies. It also includes very useful statistical data for each African country and each U.S. state. This resources is available from World Eagle Publishers .

Media Type: Media

Africa Access

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides access to over 1000 recommendations and reviews of African books as well as instructional materials for teaching and learning about Africa. Strength(s) of site: Teachers are able to search for books and materials on different topics (apartheid, history, women, etc.) and time periods (1600s, early 1900s, 1990s). Start by searching for materials by country or topic of interest. Teachers may enroll in the Africana Book Buddies Club, which encourages students to read African literature. Be aware of the fact that many of the reviews and annotations were written by university professors, librarians and teachers who have either lived in Africa or earned degrees in African Studies. An excellent resource for reading reviews on children’s literature as it relates to Africa.

Africa and The United States.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Africa, a continent of 55 nations is literally defined by dichotomy, a land of famine, human rights abuses and failed nation states but also of untapped wealth and the setting of one of history’s greatest nonviolent revolutions, the transition to Black majority rule in South Africa. These dichotomies are reflected in American foreign policy which seems caught between constructive engagement and benign neglect. Carol Lancaster, Dept. Asst. Sec. of State for African Affairs and Susan Rice, Asst. Sec. of State for African Affairs discuss American foreign policy in relation to Africa. Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, 1998. 26 min. Video/C 5822. Reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Africa Dreaming.

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Recommended because this video provides four television shorts produced in four different African countries to be shown on the African television series Africa Dreaming. In Sophia’s Homecoming (Namibia) a woman who has worked as a domestic returns home to a terrible discovery: the ruptures caused by apartheid can never be repaired. In Sabriya (Tunisia) a modern woman disrupts the patterned mosaic of male Maghrebi society. So Be It (Senegal), based on a play by Wole Soyinka, follows the destruction of a well intentioned foreign doctor confronting fear, rage and powerlessness in a remote Senegalese village. The Gaze of the Stars (Mozambique) is a story about machismo in Mozambique, so powerful that it drives away whatever it loves. 1997. 112 min. Video/C 5400. Reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Africa Since Independence

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Recommended because it provides brief but comprehensive examinations of Africa’s development since independence. The author divides his analysis of Africa into four main sections “The Romantic Period” (1939-1970), “The Period of Disillusionment, 19Middle East-1985, “The Period of Realism 1985 – and the “Period of Renaissance”. A good source for teaching and learning about Africa since independence.

Citation: C. Legum (1999). Indiana University Press.

Media Type: Book

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Africa Timelines

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides a good overview of historical time periods in African History. Start by going to the Ancient Africa section. Once here, visitors can access information about human evolution and origins in Africa. In addition, links to literature and film are available and aide in the teaching of each historical period Be aware of the fact that this site is divided into five parts beginning with Ancient Africa and ending with Post-Independence Africa and Contemporary Trends. Embedded within each part are a plethora of links which provide additional resources and information about Africa’s rich and diverse history.

Africa Today: An Atlas of Reproducible Pages (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is an excellent resource that contains a wide selection of reproducible maps on environmental, demographic, geographic and political issues relevant to the study of Africa. In addition, it includes separate country maps. This product is available from World Eagle Publishers .

Media Type: Media

Africa Web Links: University of Pennsylvania African Studies

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is a mega-site with a plethora of links to annotated resources related to the study of Africa. The site is organized around general topics and or themes. Start by going to the Story of Africa . For novice students of African history, they can access and learn about the events and characters that shaped Africa’s history from an African perspective. Also of interest is the K-12 Resource Link . This link provides educators with an annotated listing of online resources useful for teaching and learning about Africa in the classroom. For the more experienced student of African history, Africa Research Central is a good place to start if interested in primary sources relevant to Africa. A searchable database allows visitors to locate primary source repositories in Africa, Europe and North America. Be aware of languages used to execute searches at the African Research Central link. The site is accessible to both English and French speaking patrons.

Africa, (1984)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this eight part series by Basil Davidson unfold on location all over Africa, showing life as it is today. Additionally, this series contains archive footage and dramatized reconstructions. Start by viewing Part 5, The Bible and the Gun, which looks at the impact on African society of three different groups; slave traders, missionaries and colonialists. Part 6 explores This Magnificent African Cake as it traces the major developments of African history between the 1800′s and 1945. This part looks at the different ways colonial rule was established and the emergence of nationalist movements, focusing on Senegal, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and Mozambique. Be aware of the fact that there are two programs per cassette (each program is one hour long.)

Media Type: Media

African Diaspora

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site seeks to provide information concerning Black World History, with a particular focus on Black Canadian history and perspectives. The site also contains a search query feature. Typing in “Nigeria” provided access to a brief introduction to the political climate in Nigeria as well as music recordings of famous Nigerian artists and musicians. Other links of interest include Black World Events – a timeline of important events which happened to Black people around the world, and Nature in Africa – provides information about plant and animal life in Africa. Lastly, general information is available about such countries as The Republic of Ghana and The Republic of Gambia. The information includes a brief introduction of the country’s history, links to government, tourism, currency etc. Start by visiting the link titled African Diaspora . Once here, visitors are encouraged to think about such questions as What is the African Diaspora? and What is Reparations? Links are provided for video clips and original recordings of former slaves telling in their own words about their life in bondage. Be aware of of the fact that visitors must register and login to access the Reparation Discussion Forum and the Live Webcast.

African History

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Recommended because this site serves as an archive to articles and essays on African History. A plethora of topics and resources are available. Examples include links to current event articles on former political leaders in Africa, primary sources, books, museums, military history and the list goes on. Start by visiting the Era: Colonialism link. Visitors can access articles and other resources related to the colonial experience on the continent. In addition, visitors can perform regional searches as well. Each regional link provides a brief introduction to the region with additional links to key countries in that particular region. Other links of interest include slavery of Africans, and timelines in African History. A good resource for obtaining general and country specific information.

African History in Documents

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it covers five hundred years of history. Volume I: West African History begins with the writings of travelers like Ibn Battuta, Leo Africanus, Mungo Park, Heinrich Barth as well as many others. The Trans-Sahara and Cross Atlantic slave trade are a central concern of the book. The French and British colonial periods are scrutinized. Modern times are examined in the texts of Nnamidi Azikiwe, Leopold Senghor, Sekou Toure, and Kwame Nkrumah. Special emphasis is put on original African texts about political traditions, independence movements after World War II, the law and other themes of social and political history. Volume II: Eastern African History covers three thousand years of African history, beginning with reports about the ancient kingdoms of Ethiopia and Kush, ancient and medieval trade routes, including China’s discovery of Africa, the history of the East Coast, the appearance of Indian and white settlers, merchants and colonists. Modern times are considered in the documents of Jomo Kenyatta, Tom Mboya, Milton Obote, and Julius Nyerere. Volume III: Central and South Africa begins with the kingdoms of the Congo in the 14th and 15th centuries, and their histories. This volume analyses the influence and pressures of the Portuguese, the Catholic Church and slave traders on these blossoming African states. The South African section contains documents about indigenous people and the first Dutch settlement in the 17th century, including the introduction of slavery, conflicts between settlers and British missionaries as well as warfare with the indigenous states. The new political era includes the early writings of Nelson Mandela.

Citation: R.O. Collins (2001). Markus Wiener Publishers.

Media Type: Book

African History in Maps

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Recommended because of its combination of historical maps and one page overviews of historical periods. The maps included in the text provide a comprehensive and accurate coverage of the the major themes in African history from AD 1000 to present. Each map is accompanied by a facing page of concise explanatory text. The contents of the text include information about Africa’s physical geography, its peoples, North-West and North-East Africa from the 11th to 14th centuries, West African state to about 1600, Empires and kingdoms in Central and Eastern Africa, European explorers and missionaries in West, Central and East Africa. the European Partition, and the New Africa. Be aware of the fact that this text is currently out of print with limited availability.

Citation: M. Kwamena-Poh, J. Tosh, R. Waller, and M. Tidy, M. (1982). Longman Group Limited.

Media Type: Book

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African Politics and Society: A Mosaic in Transformation

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Recommended because of its comprehensive examination of continuity and change in African politics and society from the pre colonial era to the present, with a particular focus on the post Cold War era (1989-present). Each chapter emphasizes the major themes of a topic through illustrative case studies. The range of case studies includes countries from all regions and colonial traditions of the African continent. Examples of topics explored are “Understanding the African Renaissance”, “Politics and Economics of the Pre colonial Independence Era (prior to 1884), “Political and Economic Impacts of Colonialism (1884-1951), and “Ethnicity and Class”. Each chapter concludes with a list of suggested recommended readings. A good source for understanding Africa’s political and economic development.

Citation: P. J. Schraeder (2000). Beford/St. Martin’s 2000, 2004

Media Type: Book

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African Timelines

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides a good overview of historical time periods in African History. The site is divided into five parts beginning with Ancient Africa and ending with Post-Independence Africa and Contemporary Trends. Embedded within each part are a plethora of links which provide additional resources and information about Africa’s rich and diverse history. Start by visiting the link titled Anti-Colonialism and Reconstruction . Here, visitors have access to a timeline concerning anti-colonial and reconstruction efforts on the continent. In addition, links to literature and film are available which can aide in the teaching of each historical period.

African Voices

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Recommended because African Voices is a permanent exhibition that examines the diversity and global influence of Africa’s peoples and cultures over time. Included are historical and contemporary objects from the Museum’s collections, as well as commissioned sculptures, textiles, and pottery. Video interactive and sound stations provide selections from contemporary interviews, literature, proverbs, prayers, folk tales, songs, and oral epics. Navigation of the site is easy. Click on any of the scrolling themes located at the far right of the page. Start by clicking on the theme titled “History”, which examines Africa’s desire to rid itself of its colonial rulers. Also, using a timeline format, click on “Colonialism” to highlight key events during the first half of the 20th century that led to the independence of many African nations from their European colonizers.

Africans and Their History

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this resource provides a concise and readable overview of African history. Chronicles Africa’s development from early times and its relationship to the world. This is a good resource for introducing young adult students to African history. Reviewed by Africa Access.

Citation: J.E. Harris (1987), (1998). New American Library/Mentor Books

Media Type: Book

Afro@digital

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Recommended because this video looks at the information technology revolution which has become a daily reality in many African countries where the Internet, mobile telephones and digital video cameras are being used with extraordinary creativity. Visits a marabout who explains he no longer replies by letter to questions but uses his mobile phone and email to transmit his advice. Another illustration of the digital revolution in Africa is the rise of internet cafes and cyber teahouses. In some towns in Senegal and the Congo, increasing numbers are connecting to internet using a laptop computer with a mobile phone. 2003. 53 min. Video/C 9692. Reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Akhet Egyptology (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it offers interactive access to Egyptian history. Topics and materials include Akhenaten & Amarna, Tutankhamun, mummy masks, art of the afterlife, grave goods, tombs & temples, sculpture, mythology, clickable mummy, the king list, Scottish Egyptology, museums & collections, Akhet bookshop. Start by using the Clickable Mummy link. Click on different parts of the mummy to learn about mummification.

Akhet-Aten Home Page (Texas)

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Recommended because it is a good resource for Egyptian history, Amarna period. Re-creation link. Topics and materials include introduction, Akhenaten, Nefertiti, Aten, Akhetaten, art, literature, digging, glossary, new & cool, bookshop, discussion, events, postcards, web links, references, for students, for teachers, re-creation, and FAQ. This site also has updates on current events around the country related to Egypt. Start by visiting for students , for teachers , and re-creation links. Be aware of the fact that this site was last updated in 2000.

Ancient Egypt (1971. 52 min. Video/C 5.).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it shows examples of ancient Egyptian art and architecture while briefly outlining Egypt’s history. Traces the development of Egyptology and includes interviews with Egyptologists and archaeologists currently working in Egypt. Originally reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Antiquarian Maps of Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a large collection of maps. Strength of site – the map collections are geographically comprehensive and consist of over 200,000 map sheets, 3,000 atlases, and 900 reference books. Items in the Map Collection do not normally circulate. Items from a small collection of wall maps may be checked out for short term or semester use in classrooms. When other materials are needed briefly for classroom presentation, exhibition loan, or similar purposes, special arrangements can often be made with the curator. The Map Collection Library has a photocopy machine capable of making black and white copies of sheet maps up to 36″ x 48″ in size. For color copies of non-rare materials, items may be checked out for reproduction at a local, commercial printing service. Maps in bound volumes may, at the discretion of the curator, be copied on a standard photocopier. Arrangements for photography — prints, slides, etc., — can be made with the Yale Audio Visual Center. Start by clicking on the Maps of Africa link. Here visitors can access an annotated bibliography of maps of Africa. Also, under “what’s new”, check out past exhibit “Eye of the Beholder:Western Maps of Africa”

At The Tomb of Tutankhamen

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Recommended because of its well done interactive site on the site of Tutankhamen. Information on the IMAX movie, Mysteries of Egypt, can also be found here. Teacher materials. Topics and materials include background information on the site of Tutankhamen including correspondence and author information. Written in first-person story-form are the first three days of Williams’ journey into the tomb. Photos are included. Start by looking at the activity guides(under Links and Resources) which include archaeology, architecture, art, geography, math & science, and writing to learn how you can integrate Egypt across the curriculum.This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas.

Building Community West African Style

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it serves as an introduction to West African culture for both teachers and students who have little to no background knowledge of Africa. The unit provides teachers and students with a conceptual framework for learning more about West Africa. Major themes explored include “Creating Communities”, ” Geography, History and Community”, “How an African Community Works”, and African Arts in the Community. The unit consists of eighteen lessons arranged according to the themes above, a description of the slides included with the unit, recommended resources such as books and other materials on Africa.

Citation: B. Stanford (1992). Published by the Center for Teaching International Relations, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208.

Media Type: Book

California Newsreel

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because This website provides the latest in educational videos related to African American history, African cinema, race relations and diversity training. The Library of African Cinema is a video library arranged by topic. A few of the general topics explored are Gender and Women’s Studies, Francophone Africa, Political and Economic Development, Anthropology and Folklore, Health Issues and South Africa. In addition, the site provides a concise annotation of each film/video. Some films/videos are available in French and Portuguese. Information about pricing and policies is available at the site, and high schools qualify for discounts. Start by going to Francophone African Films . Here visitors can read additional information about newly released films which focus on Francophone Africa. Or click on Suitable for High School Use . Be aware of the fact that several of the films/videos are available in other languages – French or Portuguese.

Colonial Africa: Films from British Central Africa, 1940s-1960s.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its practical format of short feature films: comedies and documentary films produced in British Central Africa from the 1940s to 1960. Start by viewing these films in chronological order as they are presented in the contents: l. Lux toilet soap commercial (Container title: Mary’s lucky day) (b&w, si. with music, 11 min) — 2. The box / Central African Film Unit (1948, col., si., 22 min.) — 3. New acres / Central African Film Unit ; director, Henry Berriff ; producer, Dick Rayner (b&w, sd., 14 min.) — 4. We were primitive / Southern Rhodesia Information Service (1947, b&w, sd, 19 min.) — 5. Five messengers / Central African Film Unit (1948, col., si., 31 min.) — 6. Freedom from fear / Central African Film Unit (1960, b&w, sd., 15 min.) — 7. Rhodesia and Nyasaland news / Central African Film Unit (b&w, sd., 10 min.). 122 min.

Media Type: Media

Colonial History

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is a mega-site with a large number of links to other sites on African colonial history. Start by visiting the American Colonization Society, Library of Congress Exhibit section. The U.S. Library of Congress holds the records of the American Colonization Society which established Liberia. The exhibit descriptions provide historical background on this period. The Colonization section is part of the African-American Mosaic exhibit. Another interesting link related to the theme of colonialism in Africa is Dangerous Liaisons: Colonial Concubinage in Eritrea (1890-1941). The full text of this paper which is available in PDF format examines the relationship between Italian men and their African concubines during Italy’s colonial rule of Eritrea between 1890-1941. Be aware of the fact that some links may not be working.

Democracy and Development in Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it traces the evolution and failure of development policies, including the IMF stabilization programs that have dominated international efforts on the continent. The author maintains that the authoritarian structure the African states inherited from colonial rule created a political environment that was hostile to development. The text explores alternatives that should be considered in an effort to improve economic and political stability on the continent.

Citation: C. Ake, (1996). The Brookings Institution.

Media Type: Book

Earth Pulse

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 6, 2012

Recommended because this National Geographic site provides an immense amount of information regarding relationships of human population to world issues.  Especially useful for teaching geography (human, land, movement) and global issues.  Start with The Human Condition, then explore the menu bar on the left.  For primary students, click on the For Kids link.  Reviewed by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Egypt Virtual Classroom (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site was developed by a middle school geography teacher. Educators can download lesson plans and homework assignments. The link for Ancient Egypt provides access to additional links related to such themes as the Gift of the Nile, Land of the Dead, Pharaoh, Rosetta Stone, Cleopatra, and other relevant links. Start by clicking on the Ancient Egypt link.

Egyptology Resources

Posted by: globaledadmin on Thursday, December 24, 2009

Recommended because of its resources on Egyptology. Click on “Essential Resources“, under “Main Pages” for links to sites on Copts, Byzantine Egypt, Ptolemeic Egypt, an Ancient Egyptian dictionary, and many others.  I recommend teaching about Christian Egypt to get away from stereotyping, and provide a fuller picture of the history and culture.  Materials include: journals, magazines, organizations, societies, interesting Egypt pages, personal Egypt pages, other resources.  This site comes recommended by Education Index, Suite101.com, Excellence in Education, and LookSmart Editor’s Choice and the University of Texas.

Electronic Outreach re Africa, Latin America and the Middle East

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Many U.S. Title VI Centers for International and Area Studies are developing electronic databases for teachers. Scroll down this page to find several exciting new resources on Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Envisioning African Futures: Dystopian Predictions and Humanitarian Projects. (Emeritus Lecture Series in Anthropology; 1997)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because anthropologist Liisa Malkki presents “an array of visions of the future in Africa; scenarios and anticipations of the future that are also laden with visions of what the problems are and how they might or might not be solved.” Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Seventh annual emeriti lecture honoring professor emeritus Elizabeth Colson, October 20, 1997. 88 min. Video/C 5386. Reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

EXPLORING AFRICA: Continents of the World Geography Series

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Recommended because Reproducible readings are accompanied by activity sheets that ask follow-up questions and propose other activities (matching, map identifications, defining terms, and research and writing). In addition to thumbnail country reports, the reproducible readings cover topography, climate, animals, natural resources, industries, culture, and peoples. It is available at www.socialstudies.com.

Citation: Carson-Dellosa. 2002.

Media Type: Book

Favorite! Rosetta Stone’s Site at the Cleveland Museum of Art

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this online resource provides access to activities good for use with elementary students as it relates to the study of Ancient Egypt. Materials which can be downloaded and used in the classroom include an Egyptian coloring book, students can take a quiz – testing their knowledge about Egypt and students can print out and build a paper model of a Pharaoh’s death mask. Start by visiting the Fact or Fiction section. Here students can learn about pyramids, mummies, hieroglyphs, papyrus, Book of the Dead, pharaohs, Ra, and daily life. Be aware of the fact that the print may be difficult to read.

Hopes on the Horizon.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this video chronicles the rise of pro-democracy movements in six African countries during the 1990s: Benin: a peaceful transition from dictatorship to democracy — Nigeria: a human rights movement challenges the military — Rwanda: Historians build a platform for dialogue — Morocco: Women’s rights activists reform the traditional religious family code — Mozambique: Agricultural cooperatives advocate economic reform and land rights — South Africa: A township unites to promote quality education. 2001. 115 min. Video/C 7855. Reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

How Big Is Africa? (1998)

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Recommended because this map (24″ x 31″) poignantly illustrates the size of the African continent by superimposing the outlines of Europe, the United States, China on a map of Africa. Accompanied by a curriculum guide with five lesson plans for K-12. Developed by Deborah Smith Johnson and Barbara Brown for the African Studies Center, Boston University .

Media Type: Media

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How Europe Underdeveloped Africa

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Recommended because this text analyzes the colonial relations of production — and the economic and political contradictions — that produced Africa’s underdevelopment that of which continues to plague Africa today. I highly recommend reading this text. It counters traditional European perspectives for the need to colonize and civilize the “African”.

Citation: Rodney, Walter (1981) This text is published by the Howard University Press .

Media Type: Book

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In and Out of Africa, (1992. 59 min)

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Recommended because it explores an important phenomenon of the African colonial history. During the colonial period in the 1920′s, European interest in collecting African art stimulated a transnational trade between Africa and the West. Today this multi-million dollar trade lies largely in the hands of Muslim merchants. This is the story about one merchant.

Media Type: Media

Internet African History Sourcebook

Posted by: globaledadmin on Thursday, December 24, 2009

Recommended because this site provides links to articles and references for a wide variety of historical eras and topics, relying on both African and non-African historians of all eras, from Herodotus to Edward Morel to Kwame Nkrumah. Be aware of that not all links are working.

Introduction to the History of African Civilization (Precolonial Africa – Vol. 1)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it explores the major issues dominating African civilization from the earliest recorded period to the eve of colonial conquest. The book begins by introducing the reader to a discussion of the myths and prejudices underlying most analyses of African issues, and moves into a discussion of the origin of humanity, the similarities between the classical Nile Valley Civilizations of Egypt, Nubia, Kush and Axum, early societies in Central and Southern Africa, Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, Islam and Political Change, Africa on the Eve of Partition. The text also has a list of recommended readings. Volume II of this text is also available and explores Colonial and Post Colonial Africa. This text is available from University Press of America .

Citation: C.M. Fyle (1999).

Media Type: Book

LANIC

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because LANIC stands for the Latin American Network Information Center, and is an incredible clearinghouse of information. The maps page supplies regional overviews and country maps. This is a VERY large site, however its alphabetized listing make it easy to use. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Mapping Africa (1994)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a complete teaching unit that teaches students about the basic physical and political geography of Africa. Also can serve as a review of fundamental geographical concepts. Includes all black line masters need for lessons. This source is comprised of five lessons that require approximately five to six class periods. Appropriate for grades 6-10. This product is available from SPICE/Stanford University .

Media Type: Media

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Multimedia Archives (Pennsylvania)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides links to maps of African cities, country-specific maps, flags, and images of/from African countries. Start by clicking on the link relevant to the African country under study. Be aware of the fact that several of the links associated with the maps of individual African countries may not be working.

Outreach World

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Recommended because of its resources on regions around the world. Affiliated with the National Resource Center network, this website contains peer-reviewed lesson units for educators.  Resources are searchable by region, grade level, subject, resource type, instructional strategies, or country.  On this website, you will also find news about various outreach activities currently taking place as well as upcoming workshops, conferences and professional development opportunities offered locally, regionally, nationally and overseas. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Pyramid (1988. 60 min. Video/C 2142).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because its colorful animation and live-action sequences tell the story of the planning and construction of the pyramid of Giza. Originally reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley . Be aware of the fact that this video is based on the author’s book of the same title .

Media Type: Media

Relief Web

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this website, managed by the U.N. Department of Humanitarian Affairs, provides a wealth of information on regional crises in Africa and elsewhere in the world. The site provides background information and analyses of conflict and humanitarian disasters, funding appeals and professional resources (including job postings). The site has a vast array of maps detailing refugee movements, food and health situations, combattant areas and other variables for affected countries and regions. Start by taking the tour of the site, listed under Headlines, to learn how to best navigate the site.

Rhodes, (1996. 336 min.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a candid vision of the birth of apartheid, and the bitter wars that divided a country and devastated the people in a part of Africa. This film is a biography of Cecil Rhodes who arrived to Africa at the age of eighteen to join the diamond rush but soon conceived another ambition: to bring the entire land under
British rule. By the time he was thirty, Rhodes was one of the wealthiest men in the world and ten years later, a new country had been created and named for him, Rhodesia.

Media Type: Media

Scattered Africa: Faces and Voices of the African Diaspora.

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Recommended because this video is a documentary examining the African Diaspora, from the violent scattering of African people away from their continent of origin to their contemporary participation in a global community. The film focuses on the enormous — though largely unknown and unacknowledged — contributions of Africans and their descendants to the wealth and power of the Americans, and portrays elements of African culture that characterize everyday life throughout the Americas today. Dr. Sheila Walker and other scholars and community leaders from such diverse countries as Argentina, Uruguay, Surinam and Brazil discuss their own discovers of their heritage and the scattered transnational community that is the contemporary African Diaspora. 2002. 50 min. Video/C 9315. Reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Sundjata

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it presents a story of the first King of Mali, born about 1210 A.D. This story is told by a “jali” or “griot” an oral historian of Mali in West Africa. The story of Sundjata is divided into sixteen parts with numerous photos, a map of Mali, and other relevant links. Start by exploring the Part One of the story since this it is told chronologically. Be aware of the fact that this story is an adaption from three written versions of the Epic of Sundjata and is intended for a teenage audience.

Teaching World History: A Resource Book. (1997).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides lesson plans and ideas that focus on cross-cultural exchange, global themes, and comparative analyses in order to teach historical thinking and inquiry. The book is divided into three parts: Part 1 explores approaches to teaching world history and provides world history curricular models; Part 2 explores world history topics and issues (i.e., gender, religion, art, environment, civilizations, political systems, literature, trade, technology, philosophy, etc.); Part 3 provides strategies and lessons for elementary through graduate-level students.

Citation: Roupp, Heidi (editor). Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharp.

Media Type: Book

The Greatest Pharaohs. (198 min)

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Recommended because this four part series examine the lives of the Pharaohs of ancient Egypt using expert interviews, computer re-creations, extensive location footage and the latest archaeological and scientific evidence. viewing Part I: Narmer & Hor-Aha: the first pharaohs — Abydos: City of the dead — Saqqara and the Pyramid of Djoser — Bringer of beauty — Kings of the Giza Pyramids. This segment covering 3000 B.C. through 2500 B.C. tells of the master pyramid builder, Imhotep, and the Kings Narmer, Snefru, Hor-Aha and Khafre (Cheops) and others. Includes the building of the Giant Pyramid, the Great Sphinx and other architectural wonders. Part 2: Twilight for the Fourth Dynasty — The boy king — Rebirth — Man of power — The new kingdom — Queen Pharaohs — Revenge. Covers 2500 B.C. through 1500 B.C. tells of the Kings Menkaure (Mycerinus), Userkaf, Pepe I and II, Mentuhotep I, Senusret III, Ahmose I, Tuthmosis I, II and II, and Hatshepsut, the first Queen of Egypt. Also includes the wonders of the ancient cities of Karnak, Luxor and Thebes. Part 3: The heretic — The horizon of the sun — Image of the God of life — Return to ancient Thebes — Dawn of the 19th Dynasty. Covers 1500 B.C. through 1280 B.C. tells of the Kings Amenhotep, Akhenaton and his Queen, Nefertiti, King Tutankhamen, Ay, Horemheb, Ramses I and II, and King Seti I. Part 4: The Great ancestor — The legend of Kadesh — The sea peoples — The Pharaohs from Greece — Til death do us part. Covers 1280 B.C. through 30 B.C. tells of the reigns of Kings Merneptah, Ramses II, and III, Queen Nefertari, Alexander the Great, and the remarkable life and loves of Cleopatra, and her consorts, Julius Caesar and Marc Antony. Originally reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

The Life and Times of Sara Baartman, (1998, 52 min)

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Start by viewing this documentary film on the life of a Khoi Khoi woman who was taken from South Africa in 1810 and exhibited as a freak across Britain. The image and ideas for “The Hottentot Venus” (particularly the interest in her sexual anatomy) swept through British popular culture. A court battle waged by abolitionists to free her from her exhibitors failed. In 1814, a year before her death, she was taken to France and became the object of scientific research that formed the bedrock of European ideas about black female sexuality.

Media Type: Media

The Story of Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this online resource can aid both teachers and students in building an accurate historical knowledge base about African History. A major strength of this site is that it validates and encourages the use of African perspectives when studying African History. Start by visiting the Africa and Europe (1800-1914) section, as it relates to the theme of imperialism, colonialism and reconstruction. Here, visitors are provided with a brief overview of Europe’s perspectives about Africa. Embedded in this section are additional links to information about the Scramble for Africa, trade wars and religious conversion/resistance. Other related links include Between World Wars (1914-1945) and Independence. The site also links to audio-clips of BBC programming on The Story of Africa.

The Travels of Ibn Battuta — A Virtual Tour with the 14th Century Traveler

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Recommended because of its virtual tour across many countries in the Arab World in medieval times. This site is created by a teacher for the classroom. Topics and materials include Morocco Across North Africa, Cairo, Egypt, On to Syria & Palestine, The Hajj: Medina to Mecca, Persia & Iraq, Further into Persia, The Arabian Sea & East Africa, Anatolia, The Steppe, Return to the Steppes, Delhi, Escape from Delhi, Malaysia & China, Return Home, Andalusia & Morocco, Journey to West Africa, and Writing the Story of Ibn Battuta’s Travels — The Rihla. Reviewed originally by April Lukacsko, 4/17/02.

The Treasures of Tutankhamun (29 min. Video/C B 3 969 168 NRLF).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this program describes the genesis of the exhibition, Treasures of Tutankhamen, which will be seen in six major American cities, including Chicago. The discovery of the tomb of King Tutankhamen by Howard Carter is portrayed and many of the treasures from the tomb which are included in the exhibition are photographed. Originally reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Through African Eyes

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Recommended because these texts present African authors on historical and contemporary topics. Selections come from a variety of sources: autobiographies, fiction, poetry, newspaper and magazine articles, radio broadcasts, letters, diaries, speeches, and historical documents. Themes explored in the first volume (The Past: The Road to Independence) include The African Past, The Coming of the European, The Colonial Experience, and the Rise of Nationalism. The second volume (Culture and Society: Continuity and Change) explores such themes as Coming of Age, and Marriage and Family. Through African Eyes is an easy read for the novice teacher or student of African History.

Citation: Clark, Leon. Information about purchasing Through African Eyes Vols. I and II can be obtained by contacting CITE (Center for International Training and Education), The Apex Press, 777 United Nations Plaza, Suite 3C, New York, New York 10017. The phone number is 1-800-316-2739.

Media Type: Book

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Western Sahara, the Last Colony (Africa: Search for Common Ground; 7)

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Recommended because it is a part of a series profiling formal efforts by various Sub-Saharan African countries to peacefully resolve contemporary conflicts. The first film deals with the territory of Western Sahara which has been embroiled in conflict, as Morocco has fought the Polisario Front’s movement to gain independence in the region. Meanwhile, the future of the Saharawi people, living in exile in refugee camps in Algeria and hoping to return to their homeland, remains unclear. The second film deals with white Afrikaner farm families who are moving north to Niassa, causing fear and suspicion among peasant farmers
in the region. In this film two farmers, one a white Afrikaner, the other a Mozambican villager, meet to discuss how they can live together in an integrated society which benefits both. 1997. 26 min. Video/C 5350. Reviewed by the in the region. In this film two farmers, one a white Afrikaner, the other a Mozambican villager, meet to discuss how they can live together in an integrated society which benefits both. 1997. 26 min. Video/C 5350. Reviewed by the Media Resource Center at the University of Berkley .

Media Type: Media

Wonders of the African World

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, March 22, 2005

Recommended because this website explores the great African civilizations of Nubia, the Great Zimbabwe, Timbuktu, Ethiopia, the Swahili Coast, and the Kingdoms of Dahomey and the Ashanti. The website was constructed by Henry Louis Gates, a Harvard historian, to parallel his PBS/BBC video series exploring these themes. The site works to illuminate the achievements of Africans in these civilizations, and to debunk earlier historical bias or oversight of them. Gates examines this history and the questions it raises from an African-American perspective, in such sections as What Africa Means to Me . Start by reading through the home page and the Wonders page to get a general overview and click on the site map of Africa. Specific to Ghana, go to the Slave Kingdoms . Be sure to visit the sections for kids and classroom for lesson plans. 

World History Archives

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is unique in that it seeks to support the study of world history from different perspectives: some academic, some working-class and some non-Eurocentric. Start by narrowing your search to regional or country specific information. Be aware of the fact that print is very hard to read and visitors may have to click several related links before reaching their final destination.