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Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Teacher set $15.00, Student Texts (15 or more texts with Teacher’s Guide), $7 a copy

Media Type: Book

A Brief History of Chinese and Japanese Civilizations (2nd edition) (1991)

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Recommended because of a basic overview of Chinese and Japanese civilizations and their interconnections. Utilized in the Columbia University East Asia telecourse.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/10/02.

Citation: Schirokauer, Conrad. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich ($54.95)

Media Type: Book

A Study Guide for The Chinese: Adapting the Past, Building the Future (1992)

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Recommended because the study guide summarizes the readings and essays in The Chinese, providing learning objectives, key terms and concepts, and review and essay questions The two books are part of a telecourse package, distributed by Great Plains National, that includes the Emmy Award-winning television series The Heart of the Dragon. For telecourse information call GPN: 1 (800) 228-4630. Heart of the Red Dragon is available on loan from the University of Pittsburgh Center for International Studies Asian Studies Program Video Collection. To order e-mail asa@imap.pitt.edu Study guide available from University of Michigan Press at http://www.press.umich.edu

Citation: Buoye, M. Thomas. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press ($10.00)

Media Type: Book

ABC of Modern Japanese History (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides information about controversial modern Japanese history from an unique perspective. This site would be good for high school students to learn about Japanese historical controversial topics such as Nanking massacre, Japan-Korean relation, and history book issues. Topics and materials included in this site are readings and excerpts from newspapers and books on controversial issues of Japan, and other useful sites for further information. Start by “At the Frontlines.” It provides readings about contemporary issues. Especially it is recommended to use an article “The Meaning of Nationalism in Japan today” discussing resurgence of Japanese militarism. Be aware of the contents, which may be inappropriate for lower grade students because of controversial issues. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Along the Silk Road

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because world history, geography, and world culture classes will benefit from this unit’s treatment of the rich and colorful history and geography of the Silk Road. Recommended for engaging small group activities, which draw on many primary sources, will allow students to explore these historic routes through the lives of people who have lived and traveled these pathways from early days to the present. An adaptation of the simulation Heelotia is included. Recommended for middle school, high school.
Reviewed from SPICE website includes connections to curriculum standards.

Citation: http://spice.stanford.edu

Media Type: Book

Ancient Chinese Paintings (1978)

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Recommended because “Introducing the unique concepts and character of Chinese painting, this video presents a number of the finest works from the collection of the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Taiwan, including four from the Tang dynasty (618-907), three from the Sung (960-1280), three from the Yuan (1280-1368), five from the Ming (1368-1644), and two from the Ching (1644-1911). This video is ideal for high-school art classes or any serious appreciator of painting arts.” Recommended for advanced middle school/secondary/post secondary. VHS, 25 minutes.
Reviewed from the catalog of the EAP Resource Lending Library at Cornell University. Instructions for loan at http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu/eastasia/outreach/videoCatalog/catalog.pdf

Media Type: Media

Ancient Futures: Learning from Ladakh. (1993).

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Recommended because it explores environmental, social, and psychological problems associated with our push for ‘progress’ and ‘development through an examination of the breakdown of Ladakh’s culture and environment (ecological balance and social harmony) because of ‘modernization’. The film is based on the Helena Norberg-Hodge (founder of ISEC) and Peter Matthiessen book of the same name.

Media Type: Media

Asia in Western and World History A Guide for Teaching (1997)

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Recommended because of its guide for high school teachers for ways to integrate Asia into the teaching of world history. Although aimed at lower level college courses, the essays are also pertinent to high school. Particularly interesting essays include The Beginnings of Contact and Interdependence, Images of the Other: Asia in Nineteenth Century Western Thought, Some Contrasts and Comparisons of Zhou China and Ancient Greece.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/10/02.
Available from — M.E. Sharpe, Inc. 80 Business Park Drive Armonk, NY 10504 Phone: 1-800-541-6563 Fax: (914) 273-2106

Citation: Embree, Ainslie & Gluck, Carol (Eds.). Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe ($98.95)

Media Type: Book

Asian Studies Documents (UCLA)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides access to full text copies of significant historical and contemporary documents in English from China, Korea, Japan and other Asian countries. Start by documents related to U.S.-Asia, U.S.-China, and U.S. – Japan since they present historical information about U.S. relationship with a couple of Asian countries. Be aware of the fact that this site includes the constitutions of China, Korea and Japan. Good source of primary materials.
This resource was originally recommended by the UCLA center for East Asian Studies.

Before the Dawn (1987)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because historical novel set in the second half of the 19th century, It spans the close of the Edo period and the first few decades of the Meiji period. Chronicling the lives of the family and friends of a village headman and toiya along a national highway after the coming of Perry’s black ships, it also offers oblique political commentary of the Tokugawa bakufu in the decade preceding the Meiji Restoration and the period immediately following.
Reviewed by East Asian Studies Center Indiana University.

Citation: Shimazaki, Toson. Translated by William E. Naff. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. $32.95.

Media Type: Book

Britannica.com

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this on-line encyclopedia has entries for the Ch’ing dynasty (Qing), the Ming Dynasty (Ming), Cheng Ho (Zheng He)–the Ming dynasty navigator, and more. Bolded names here indicate the preferred search terms as the encyclopedia uses Wade Giles romanization for Chinese names and terms. Start by “Biography of the Day” as it provides a brief introduction of world events occurred on this day. Be aware of the fact that you need to register to view full Britannica articles and 72 hours of free access is available here.
Reviewed from China: A Teaching Workbook. http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/mainframe.htm/ (not working); updated by Masataka Kasai, 7/08/03.

Calling Tokyo (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) $75

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because despite their own, their family’s, and their friends’ internment during World War II, a small number of Japanese Americans played a crucial and secret role in the American war effort against Japan by serving as hosts of Japanese-language radio propaganda shows that were broadcast by the U.S. Office of War Information and the British Political Warfare Mission via short wave to Japan. This engaging historical documentary unveils for the first time these Japanese-Americans’ vital but unheralded contributions to the Allied cause. Occasioned by the mystery of what the filmmaker’s now-deceased father had done during the war and his family’s internment, the film combines archival footage, commentary by remaining participants, and detailed historical recreations to recount this remarkable but virtually unknown chapter of the war. “Calling Tokyo” will spur discussion in a variety of courses in Japanese-American and Asian-American studies, American history, and ethnic studies. It was produced by Gary T. Ono. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Changing Lifestyles (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) $129.95 per video

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Recommended because from busy, overcrowded cities to the bucolic remoteness of the countryside, the lives of average Japanese people vary greatly. Japan 2000 concludes with a look at these different lifestyles. A typical, expensive high-rise apartment is compared with projects designed to provide cheaper housing and relieve city overcrowding. A young family on a remote island discusses the advantages and disadvantages of their chosen lifestyle. A young woman compares her lifestyle with that of her more traditional parents. 2003; English. Color. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

China Briefing 2000: The Continuing Transformation (2000)

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Recommended because this is a reference for teachers and advanced high school students for expert analysis of the current state of affairs in China. It covers political, economic and social issues in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. To order, e-mail: AsiaStore@asiasoc.org
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/06/02.

Citation: White, Tyrene. (Ed.). Armonk, NY; London, England: M.E. Sharpe ($28.95)

Media Type: Book

China in Brief

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because provided by the Chinese Embassy in Washington, this site offers the official view on the following topics: 1) Physical Geography; 2) History; 3) Population and Ethnic Groups; 4) Religions and Social Customs; 5) Administrative Divisions; 6) Political System and State Structure; 7) Foreign Relations; 8) The Course of economic Development; 9) The Socialist Market Economy; 10) Agriculture; 11) Industry; 12) Finance and Taxation; 13) Transport Posts and Telecommunications; 14) Banking and Insurance; 15) Tourism; 16) Opening to the Outside Wide; 17) Urban Construction and Real Estate; 18) Environmental Protection; 19) The Peoples’ Livelihood; 20) Education; (21) Science and Technology; (22) Culture and Art; (23) Medical and Health Work; and (24) Physical Culture and Sports. Recommended for the multitude of possibilities it offers students to contrast differing views of history and society. Start by “History” since it provides detailed information about Chinese history divided into four time periods: Ancient, Modern Period, New Democratic Revolution Period, and Contemporary. Be aware of the fact that this site also presents some ethnic groups in China in “Population & Ethnic Groups.”

China Mosaic (1988) (1990 printing)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this includes a free collection of activities for middle-school students on the Qin (Ch’in) dynasty, Confucius, the Tale of Monkey, the Chinese language, society, agriculture, the political system, and shadow puppets. It was produced by teachers in the state of Washington and edited by Mary Hammond Bernson of the University of Washington in conjunction with the State Education Department.
Reviewed from http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/

Citation: Mary Hammond Bernson. Olympia, WA : Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Media Type: Book

China Rising: The Epic History of 20th Century China (1991)

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Recommended because there are three volumes in the series. The first, Paradise of Adventurers, examines the nationalist uprising of 1925, when opposition mounted against ‘foreign devils’ and Chiang Kai-Shek triumphed over the warlords to unify the nation. Extraordinary interviews with Shanghai citizens, former leaders – even surviving warlords.” This was a time when thousands of suspected communists were murdered by the “waterfront mafia.” The second, Change in Heaven, “tells how the communists regrouped after the Long March, and how they planned the defeat of two enemies: The Japanese and the nationalists.” Interviews with survivors of the Long March share memories of the declaration of the PRC and the early years of the Communist regime. The third video, Roads to Freedom, tells the story of the ‘Cultural Revolution’ told by the men and women who experienced. A surviving judge remembers the dramatic “Gang of Four” trial that occurred after Mao’s death. The film also covers the violence of the Red Guards in the 1960s to the economic reforms of recent years.” Recommended for World History courses at the secondary level. The History Channel (VHS)
Reviewed from the East Asia Program Resource Lending Library at Cornell University.

Media Type: Media

China the Beautiful

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides audiovisual and map resources. Start by “About ‘China the Beautiful’ and then to China Room. Excellent map section including satellite photos, historical maps, a map of China superimposed on the U.S. Hear poetry read in Chinese. Has on-line Chinese flash cards with pronunciation, parables in English and Chinese, artwork, calligraphy, poetry, classics, novels, science, philosophy / religion, history culture, language, theater / opera, descriptions of holiday, slides. Be aware of the fact that this site is a mega site offering numerous information and materials. Thus, it is recommended for teachers to have particular topic to search before exploring this site. Recommended for high school and middle school.

China through Mapping (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) $24.95

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because in this lesson, Mimi Norton integrates world geography with the study of Chinese culture and history by engaging her young students in a variety of activities to locate natural and human-made landmarks on maps of China. To build background for this lesson, she has had the students create salt-dough maps of China and label them with map symbols. Ms. Norton begins the lesson by reviewing map symbols with students and having them use the symbols to locate important natural and human-made land forms on desk maps. Then the class sings a song about the continents and oceans and locates them on a floor map. Ms. Norton explains that they will use what they are learning about scale in math class to enlarge a small map of China to room size. To do this, Ms. Norton first draws a large grid on the floor. Then she hands out cards, each representing a small section of China. Students then copy the information on their card to the corresponding square on the floor grid. The result is a large floor map of China. After the map has been drawn, students label the natural and human-made features at the correct locations on the map. Ms. Norton reads a story about a fictitious traveler in China and has students trace the traveler’s journey. As a culminating activity, students don a Chinese dragon costume and walk to famous locations on the map. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

China Vista: China Virtual Tours

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site has virtual tours of a number of Chinese cities. This site is one of the few sites that has good visual images of China. Each slide has good explanatory information.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/07/02. Start by exploring virtual tours of some cities to find similarities and differences among them. Be aware of the fact that some of the cities in this site also includes related articles.

China WWW Virtual Library: Internet Guide for China Studies

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Recommended because of its exhaustive links to on-line sources for East Asian History and Chinese history. Although intended for scholars, much can be useful to the world history teacher as well. Start by putting Chinese Propaganda Posters, Rethinking Cultural Revolution Culture, Picturing Power: Posters of the Cultural Revolution, The Chairman Smiles in the entries box at the left hand side of the page. Be aware of the fact that Posters from the former Soviet Union, Cuba and China, and Chinese Pop Posters which are links to sites of Chinese propaganda, many of which can be downloaded. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/13/02; updated by Masataka Kasai, 7/09/03.

China: Understanding Its Past (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because China: Understanding Its Past aims to fill a conspicuous gap in conventional world history texts, which are often Eurocentric and give scant attention to Asia. Using role-playing, simulations, debates, primary documents, first person accounts, excerpts from literary works, and cooperative learning activities, this text will help students explore many key aspects of China’s history and culture. $24.00 The teacher’s manual includes a synopsis of each chapter and section, learner outcomes, definitions of key concepts, directions for student activities, and possible responses to questions posed in the student text. The CD contains selections of Chinese music from different time periods and locales. Liner notes include English translations of lyrics as well as historical information about each selection. Manual and CD $39.00. http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/index.html (Do a “specific search” for title and enter the name of the book)

Citation: Tamura, E. et al. (Eds.). Honolulu: Curriculum Research & Development Group. University of Hawaii, and University of Hawai’i Press.

Media Type: Book

China: A Country Study

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this Library of Congress site contains good background material for teachers on every topic from history to geography to education and culture, industry, government, political process. Start by “Chapter 1. Historical Setting” since it provides information about Chinese history divided into five categories: The Ancient Dynasties, The Imperial Era, Emergence of Modern China, Republican China, and The People’s Republic of China. Be aware of bookmarking the outline and not the subject files which appear as they are temporary files only.

China: A New History (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of a comprehensive history of China. Secondary and teacher reference. From the Indiana University East Asian Studies Center Selected Bibliography of Resources (China).

Citation: Fairbank, John K. and Goldman, Merle. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press ($18.95)

Media Type: Book

China: Understanding Its Past (1998)

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Recommended because this includes innovative uses of role-playing, simulations, debates, primary documents, first-person accounts, exceprts from literary works and cooperative learning activities to explore these and other key aspects of China’s history and culture from 600 BCE to the present. What did it mean to be a daughter in imperial China: How did extraterritoriality affect China’s ability to cope with foreigners in the 19th century? What was at stake as the Communists and Guomingdang (Nationalists) fought a civil war to win allegiance of China’s people? Recommended for middle/secondary schools.
Reviewed at http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu/eastasia/outreach/videoCatalog/catalog.pdf The East Asia Program Resource Lending Library of Cornell University.
The book is available on loan through Cornell. Instructions for lending are given at the beginning of the catalog.

Citation: Tamura, E. et al. (Eds.). Honolulu: Curriculum Research & Development Group. University of Hawaii, and University of Hawaii Press.

Media Type: Book

China: Understanding Its Past (1998) Tamura, E. et al. (Eds.).

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Recommended because China: Understanding Its Past aims to fill a conspicuous gap in conventional world history texts, which are often Eurocentric and give scant attention to Asia. Using role-playing, simulations, debates, primary documents, first person accounts, excerpts from literary works, and cooperative learning activities, this text will help students explore many key aspects of China’s history and culture. $24.00 The teacher’s manual includes a synopsis of each chapter and section, learner outcomes, definitions of key concepts, directions for student activities, and possible responses to questions posed in the student text. The CD contains selections of Chinese music from different time periods and locales. Liner notes include English translations of lyrics as well as historical information about each selection. Manual and CD $39.00. http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/index.html (Do a “specific search” for title and enter the name of the book)

Citation: Tamura, E. et al. (Eds.). Honolulu: Curriculum Research & Development Group. University of Hawaii, and University of Hawaii Press.

Media Type: Media

Chinese Belief Systems from Past to Present and Present to Past Geoffrey Foy

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its coverage of the major belief systems that have shaped China’s history. Includes a list of references for each belief system. Start by reading the first section of this reading since it introduces what belief systems mean and why this reading deals with the belief systems. Be aware of the fact that other readings on China and other countries in Asia are also available in “readings” of AskAsia site.

Chinese Posters

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Recommended because this is a collection of posters from three periods of Chinese history: Early Years (1949-1965), Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), Modernization (1977-1997) Recommended for high school. A unique view of China’s political history through posters. Can be downloaded and printed. Start by exploring some posters on this page to find out what each poster was meant to be. Be aware of the fact that this website also offers Soviet Posters and Cuban Posters. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy 3/18/2002; updated by Masataka Kasai, 7/09/03.

Chronology of Modern China

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Recommended because of its excellent chronology of China’s history through 1999. Published by the Asia Society in honor of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the PRC. Especially good as a time line for world history courses which can integrate events in China with events throughout the rest of the world. Start by “Qing Dynasty” (China’s last imperial dynasty) to find out how the dynasty has fallen and Republic and People’s Republic of China have established. Be aware of the fact that “Time & Chronologies” offer a collection of links for timelines and chronologies including country histories, significant events, and chronologies of historical individuals. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/08/02.

City of Cathay

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is a CD-Rom which views Chinese life of the Song dynasty through scenes of daily life captured in a famous handscroll painting of a festival day. The handscroll is an original 18th century copy of a Song dynasty painting; it was viewed by emperors and is in the collection of the National Palace Museum in Taiwan. It depicts life in 13th century China, the China about which Marco Polo wrote.
Reviewed in http://afe.easia.columbia.edu
Available from: Lee and Lee Communications 399 West Trimble Road, Bldg 3 San Jose, CA 95131 Phone: (408) 434-3380 Price: $49.95

Media Type: Media

Classical Korean Poetry: More Than 600 Verses Since the 12th Century (1994)

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Recommended because the 600 verses presented in this anthology will provide the reader with comprehensive and varied aspects of the sijo, the traditional Korean lyric, since its emergence as a fixed literary form as early as the late 12th century down to the 19th century. This text refers to editorial review.

Citation: Selected and translated with an introduction by Jaihiun J. Kim. Fremont. CA: Asian Humanities Press.

Media Type: Book

Conflict Activity Cards. (1995).

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Recommended because it is a collection of action-oriented cards of supplementary activities for primary, elementary, middle and high school students. The objectives of the cards/activities are to teach students to: (1) recognize and identify various kinds of conflict, (2) discover the presence of conflict in everyday life, (3) recognize the presence of power, emotions, violence, etc. in conflicts, (4) identify and understand all sides/perspectives of a conflict, (5) accept responsibility for one’s actions in conflict situations, (6) practice negotiating skills, and (7) generate alternative ways of resolving or coping with conflict.

Citation: Webb, Farren, et al. Denver: Center for Teaching International Relations (CTIR) ($16.95).

Media Type: Book

Conversations with History: Shaping Hong Kong’s Future

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because conversation with Anson Chang, chief secretary of Hong Kong, January 27, 1997. Dr. Anson Chan, a career public servant, was the Chief Secretary of the Hong Kong government at the time of this interview. In that position she was a principal advisor to the Chief Executive, and head of Hong Kong’s 190,000-member civil service. Dr. Chan was the first woman, and the first person of Chinese ancestry, to hold that position. Start by “Background” and ending “Conclusion” in order. Be aware of the fact that this interview is part of the “Conversations with History” series from the Institute of International Studies, University of California, Berkeley. High school. RealPlayer plug-in needed to access the streaming media.
Reviewed from http://afe.easia.columbia.edu

Conversations with History: The Political Education of a Chinese Dissident

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Recommended because of its conversation with human rights activist, Wei Jingsheng, November 19, 1998. Start by “Background” and ending “Conclusion” in order. Be aware of the fact this interview is part of the “Conversations with History” series from the Institute of International Studies, University of California, Berkeley. High school. RealPlayer plug-in is needed to access the streaming media.
Reviewed from http://afe.easia.columbia.edu

Country Watch

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Recommended because this site is an information provider for schools, universities, libraries and individuals who need up-to-date information and news on the countries of the world. Topics and materials included in this site are country, political, economic, social, and environmental overview information about countries around the world, curriculum, interesting facts, statistical database, thematic and physical maps, global news, and more. Start by logging in and going to “Countrywatch.com@school” since it offers curriculum materials including lesson plans and course outlines for using CountryWatch in geography and social studies courses. Be aware of the fact that if you want larger maps, you need to be a subscriber in order to get username and password (Here is a list of options to be a subscriber).

Digital China/Harvard Site

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Recommended because of the use of primary sources and images from the film The Opium War. This is an internet-mediated educational channel with China. This is a useful site for high school world history. Start by a page on the Opium War with Chinese Commissioner Lin Zexu’s letter of advice to Queen Victoria, dated 1839 (which served to precipitate the war) Be aware of the fact that some of the links provided on this site do not work.

Earth Pulse

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 6, 2012

Recommended because this National Geographic site provides an immense amount of information regarding relationships of human population to world issues.  Especially useful for teaching geography (human, land, movement) and global issues.  Start with The Human Condition, then explore the menu bar on the left.  For primary students, click on the For Kids link.  Reviewed by Sara Adducchio 2012.

East Asia: A New History (2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because a general history of the region. Utilized in the Columbia University East Asia telecourse as a basic text.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy 5/10/02.

Citation: Murphey, Rhoads. New York: Longmans ($58.33)

Media Type: Book

East Asia: From Chinese Predominance to the Rise of the Pacific Rim (1993)

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Recommended because this book presents history of civilizations in East Asia. Topics and materials included in this book are the three historical parts: (1) Chinese predominance, (2) a new balance of power, and (3) the rise of the Pacific Rim. The first chapter illustrates how the classical Chine (1650-206 B.C.) and the early Chinese Empire (206 B.C. – A.D. 1368) affected other Asian countries including Korea, Japan, and South – East Asia. The second chapter discusses the relationship between the late Chinese empire (1368 – 1912) and other Asian countries. The last chapter examines the impacts of modern times on East Asian countries. Start by the first two chapters since they explicitly illustrate how China significantly affected other Asian countries in a historical perspective.

Citation: Cotterell, Arthur. London : John Murray. $14.95.

Media Type: Book

East Asia: Tradition and Transformation (1989)

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Recommended because of general textbook on East Asian history recommended for secondary by Indiana University East Asian Studies Center ($40.00)

Citation: Fairbank, John., Reischauer, Edwin., & Craig, Albert. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin.($40.00)

Media Type: Book

Fact Monster

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site attempts to empower learners of all ages to reach their full potential. This site would be good for students of all grades. Topics and materials included in this site are world & news, U.S., people, word wise, science, math, sports, cool stuff, games & quizzes, homework center, and atlas, almanac, dictionary, and encyclopedia. Start by “Atlas” since it provides regional maps and geographic information. Be aware of the fact that “Atlas” also provides rich information about Geography under the name of “Geography Guide.”

Forgotten People: The Sakhalin Koreans (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because This provocative documentary presents a neglected aspect of World War II and a tragic legacy of the Cold War: the saga of the Koreans who spent 50 years on Sakhalin Island. Koreans were brought by the Japanese to the island as forced laborers during the war to work in the deepest sections of the coal pits, as well as on railroads, in forests and army bases, only to be abandoned into the hands of the Soviet Union in August 1945. Forgotten by everyone including their own country, less than 1,000 remain of the original 43,000 laborers. It is a universal story of displaced people whose lives were assigned to oblivion as the power struggle unfolded in the latter part of the twentieth century. Grades: Secondary Education, Higher Education.
Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Global Goverance, Critical Perspectives

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Recommended because each chapter deals with what the authors refer to as key core issues. Among the more interesting chapters are the chapters on Global Governance, Human Rights and the Problem of Culture; Global Governance and Human Security; Organizing Labor and Global Governance; and Global Governance and Poverty Reduction. This work could prove invaluable in any secondary school classroom dealing with global governance. This work is ordered thematically instead of by global institutions. Reviewed by Ron Reichel.

Citation: Wilkinson, Rorden and Hughes, Steve Routledge. Routledge. July, 2002. ISBN:0415268389. $28.

Media Type: Book

History’s Turning Points: The Great Wall of China

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Recommended because this video chronicles the first emperor of China, Chin, who transformed seven warring kingdoms into a nation. “His vision of a united China involved building the Great Wall. It proved a stroke of genius as a physical and psychological boundary, protecting civilized China from the outside world, but it was also known as the Wall of Tears as it became the longest graveyard in the world for exhausted laborers and out-of-favor scholars. This video uses extensive on-site footage, newsreel footage, and simulated events to tell the story of China and the Great Wall.” Recommended for secondary as a way to look at the cost often paid by ordinary people for the projects of their leaders.
Reviewed in the EAP Resource Lending Library at Cornell University. http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu/eastasia/outreach/lending/video.asp Available on loan throughout the U.S.

Media Type: Media

Human Geography: People, Places, Change (1996)

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Recommended because this program disrupts simple notions of East versus West and challenges Western accounts of globalization. It draws attention to developments in the East that have potential consequences for the West and examines the role that overseas Chinese people play in the transnational business network. Recommended for secondary schools.
Reviewed from The East Asia Program Resource Lending Library Catalog at Cornell University.

Media Type: Media

Internet East Asian History Sourcebook (Kansas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its vast collection of teaching materials on East Asian topics (especially China, Japan and Korea) in a historical perspective that this site covers. Although this site is aimed at a college, it would be good for K-12 history teachers to find teaching materials. Topics and materials included in this site are collection of sources from cultural origins to China, Japan, and Korea since WWII, other East Asian countries, East Asia: Gender and Sexualities, and maps. Start by any topic provided in a “Contents” section based on teaching topics or students’ interests. Be aware of the fact that these sources are organized in a chronological order and other sources based on eras such as ancient, medieval, and modern, and based on regions such as Africa, and global, and based on topics such as Islamic, Gay and Lesbian, and science are also available in this original site.
This resource was originally recommended by the center for East Asian Studies at University of Kansas.

Japan-Guide: Japanese History (Washington)

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Recommended because this site is designed to describe Japanese history. It would be good for high school students. Topics and materials included in this site are critical information on Japanese history divided into distinctive time periods: early Japan, Nara and Heian periods, Kamakura period, Muromachi period, Azuchi-Momoyama period, Edo period, Meiji period, Taisho and Early Showa period, and Postwar period, and other history related pages such as emperor, atomic bomb, and religions, and historic photo exhibitions. Start by “Periods of Japanese History” since it presents an overview table on Japanese historical events. Be aware of the fact that the page in each time period includes key words hyperlinked to the relevant websites. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asia center at University of Washington.

Japanese History and Literature (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this material helps students discover what Japanese literature reveals about the history and culture of this innovative country. The Programs include interviews with specialists from Columbia University and excerpted permoances of major works.
Individual Programs
Classical Japan and the Tale of Genji (552-1185)
The Japanese genius for cultural borrowing, waka poetry, prose, and the literary contributions of women. Program length: 45 minutes.

Medieval Japan and Buddhism in Literature (118Slavic and Eastern Europe-1600)
The warfare and disruption of Japans feudal era and a comparison to medieval Europe, along with the influence of Buddhism on literature and drama. Program length: 45 minutes.

Tokugawa Japan and Puppet Theater, Novels, and the Haiku of Basho
The dramatic changes of this era, which laid the basis for the Meiji period, and how literature gave voice to the new urban population. Program length: 70 minutes.

Curriculum Package
3 Programs (varying lengths) on 3 cassettes
Guide
Right to duplicate one set of videos
CA98101-JPSVE — $110
Each program with guide — $49.95
Coordinated Print Guide: Japanese History and Literature (1997)
Enrique and Martin, The Annenberg/CPB Project ($15.00)

Media Type: Media

Japanese Old Photographs in Bakumatsu – Meiji Period

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is an English-Japanese site for a collection of hand-tinted photographs of Japan, 1860-1920, showing foreign settlements, urban and rural scenery, culture, people, in Tokyo, Nagasaki, Osaka, Kobe, and elsewhere. Start by any search engine depending upon what image you are looking for. This site provides four types of search engine so that you can find images based on words, key words, areas, and shelf number. Be aware of the fact that the collection holds over 5000 images.

Japanese School Textbooks: High School, Vol. 2 (Japan In Modern History) (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because in order to let people in other countries know just what young Japanese are being taught in this field, ISEI has published, with the cooperation of Professor Toriumi Yasushi of Chuo University, a series entitled Japanese School Textbooks. The series brings together those portions with foreign countries since ancient times, but this series deals mainly with the period since the opening of Japan in the mid-nineteenth century after some 200 years of seclusion, a period in which relations with the outside world underwent particularly striking changes. Japan in Modern History contains a history of Japan from the pre-modern to the post-modern period. Includes a final chapter that covers religious beliefs, the legal system, and technology.
Reviewed in the EAP Resouce Lending Library Catalog at Cornell University. http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu/ Available on loan throughout the U.S.

Citation: International Society for Educational Information, Inc. Tokyo: International Society for Educational Information.

Media Type: Book

Kids Peace Station Hiroshima (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site makes an effort to present a life of Sadako Sasaki who was a victim of the atomic bomb and provide a chance to talk about peace. Topics and materials included in this site are The Sadako Story 21, Sadako and the Atomic Bombing, Kids Peace Plaza (Discussion Forum), Kids News, and relevant links. Start by “The Sadako Story 21″ since this movie file provides students with an opportunity to learn about a life of one kid victim of the atomic bomb and what we can do. Be aware of Be aware that you need Flash Player (plug-in) in order to watch the movie files (A link to the website to download Flash Player is provided in this site.) This resource was originally recommended by East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

King Sejong’s Secret (2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because set in Korea in the mid-1400s, this enchanting tale takes place during the reign of real-life King Sejong, who is credited with the creation of Korea’s hanguel alphabet. In Farley’s fictional account, the compassionate king is inspired to create a simple system of writing to replace the complex 10,000-character Chinese method after a young boy who tends his garden expresses a deep desire to learn to read and write. It turns out that creating the 28 symbols of the new alphabet is considerably easier than convincing the Korean people that using it will not anger the gods. Again the young gardener provides the inspiration–and also the handiwork needed to get the job done. The result is a magical ending in which village elders and teachers, when they see the symbols etched in the leaves of the garden, believe the gods are now embracing the new alphabet. Highly detailed, beautifully rendered scenes provide important visual clues about the story, and an informative author’s note enhances the tale. Ages Slavic and Eastern Europe-8.
Reviewed by Lauren Peterson, American Library Association

Citation: Farley, Carol., Cooper, Floyd., Jew, Robert. Lothrop Lee & Shepard. ($15.89)

Media Type: Book

Korean Enigma

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site attempts to provide information about various historical aspects of Korea. Topics and materials included in this site are situation of Korea, history of Korea, current Korea, data and reports about environmental issues in Korea, and photographs of Korea from Space Shuttle. Start by “Situation” since it provides information about relationship between Korea and East Asia countries. Be aware of the fact that “Korea from Space” provides views of Korea or regions in Korea from space.

Korean War Children’s Memorial Web Site (Indiana)

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Recommended because this site commemorates the Humanitarian Aid the United States Armed Forces Rendered the Children of Korea from 1950 to 1954. This site would be good for junior high or high school students to learn about how the United States armed forces helped the children of Korea during Korean war. Topics and materials included in this site are various archives, photos Korean War Veterans, newspaper clippings, and their own stories. Start by “Memories” since it provides photos, personal stories, or newspaper clippings about Korean war. Be aware of the fact that “Get Involved” presents some things that you or your students can do. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Land of Morning Calm: Korean Culture Then and Now (2003)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Land of Morning Calm gives us a better understanding of the people behind the news and the traditions we dont get to see on television as North and South Korea quickly become important players in global politics. It opens a window into another way of life, reminding us once again that we are all as similar as we are different.
What was life like in Ancient Korea? What did people eat? What did they believe in? How is it different now? Take a journey to both ancient and modern Korea, where you will find a rich world of history and traditions that will capture your imagination and whet your appetite for learning more about this fascinating culture. Read about the legend behind the founding of Korea, the meaning of the flag, and the creation of the Korean alphabet. Learn how to make kimchi, how to celebrate Korean holidays, and how people ironed their clothes before electricity. Be aware of the fact that every page explains an aspect of Korean culture and its changes through the years. This resource was originally reviewed by Shen’s Books.

Citation: Stickler, John & Han, Soma Shen’s Books (http://www.shens.com/cgi-bin/mas/category.cgi?category=welcome) $16.95

Media Type: Book

LANIC

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because LANIC stands for the Latin American Network Information Center, and is an incredible clearinghouse of information. The maps page supplies regional overviews and country maps. This is a VERY large site, however its alphabetized listing make it easy to use. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Made in China – Ideas and Inventions from Ancient China (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because the book explores ancient China’s scientific discoveries and technology in this lively account of people, ideas, and social change from 1600 B.C. to the present. If students have any stereotypes of Chinese as backward, this will break them. Recommended for middle school/high school.
Reviewed from Chinese Tapes on-line catalog ($19.95).

Citation: Williams, Suzanne. Berkeley, CA: Pacific View Press. ($19.95)

Media Type: Book

Mao and Gandhi: Alternative Paths to National Independence and Social Change (2002)

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Recommended because of the comparative perspective it applies to the complex issues of nation building and social change. Two ways, one nonviolent and the other and the other based on the idea that political change comes out of the barrel of a gun. The unit examines the objectives of the two leaders and the methods they used to reach them. Recommended for high school.
Reviewed from NCHS website.
Available for $11.00 from the National Center for History in the Schools (NCHS) at http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

Citation: Joint publication of National Center for History in the Schools and the Asia Society.

Media Type: Book

Map (Index Page): Japan National Tourist Organization (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides three options to find the best maps of Japan. Topics and materials included in this site are Keyword map search, Map based search, and maps of main cities centers and famous tourist spots in Japan. This site will be the first to visit to find maps of Japan, and regions or cities in Japan. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Maps of Asia (Texas)

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Recommended because this site offers a long list of downloadable maps of Asia and specific Asian countries from the Caspian Sea to the Pacific. Includes maps of Central Asia as well.
Reviewed by Merry Merryfield, 2/28/02. Be aware of the fact that this site also provides downloadable maps in different regions and of the world.

Maps of China

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Recommended because this is a good source of maps of contemporary China from full country maps to provincial maps. Recommended for middle school and high school.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy 4/17/02.

Modern Korean literature: an anthology, 1908-65 (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because the stories in this anthology map a crucial period Korean history, and constitute the pinnacle of literary achievement in that country. The writers cover themes of gender conflict and confrontation, the problems resulting from the intersection of traditional modes of life with industrialization, the Japanese Occupation, and the trauma of the Korean War.
Reviewed by Kegan Paul International.

Citation: Chung, Chong-wha. (Ed.). London: Kegan Paul International. ($110.00)

Media Type: Book

Monks and Merchants

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site offers exploration of Silk Road treasures from Northwest China, Gansu and Ningxia, 4th to 7th Century with this online companion to the Asia Society’s Monks and Merchants exhibition. This website explores the main themes of Monks and Merchants through a selection of the objects in the exhibition. Topics and materials included in this site are sections about introduction, heavenly horses, Nomad rulers, Buddhism and China, Buddhist cave temples, Bodhisattvas, monks, Merchants and currencies, the Tang Dynasty, the Silk road, and credits. Start byIntroduction” as it discusses a brief history of China and the silk road. Be aware of the fact that this site presents some videos requiring QuickTime to watch and a download link is provided. A separate section, “The Silk Road – A Broader Perspective,” expands upon these themes, placing the Silk Road in a much larger historical, cultural, political, and religious context.
Reviewed from AsiaSource, Arts and Culture. For more information, please check this site — http://www.asiasource.org; updated by Masataka Kasai, 7/08/03.

Naomi. (2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because set in early 20th century Japan, the author struggles with the issue of a modernizing Japan adopting greater elements of Western thought or maintaining traditional Japanese value.
Reviewed by East Asian Studies Center Indiana University.

Citation: Tanizaki, Junichiro. Translated by Anthony Chambers. New York: Vintage International. $12.00.

Media Type: Book

National Museum of Japanese History (Cornell)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site offers a comprehensive table of Japanese chronological history. This site would be good for elementary, junior high, and high school students to learn about overview of Japanese history. The topic and materials included in this site are guide to the museum, a table of Japanese history, and related links for further information. Start by “Japanese Chronological Table” as it provides major historical events in Japan from ca. 100,000 B.C. This table can be used as supplementary material. Be aware of the fact that “Internet Gallery” provides art screens of views of Tokyo (Edo) and Kyoto. This resource was originally recommended by East Asia Program at Cornell University.

Pacific Century: The Emergence of Modern Pacific Asia (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is a textbook and study guide recommended for secondary by Indiana University East Asian Studies Center.

Citation: Borthwick, Mark. Boulder, CO: Westview Press ($55.00)

Media Type: Book

People’s Century: Great Leap, 1949-1976

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it features the voices of Chinese who lived during this period. This site includes interview with Jin Jingzhi, Chinese Citizen, Shanghai about her life in China before and after 1949. The complete interview can be seen in text and excerpts are available on RealAudio. In this special segment of the McNeil-Lehrer Report on PBS, people remember: Mao Zedong, the People’s Liberation Army, “take-over” of 1949, land reform, Great Leap Forward, denunciation meetings, communes, Cultural Revolution, Red Guards, arrest of Gang of Four, and Deng Xiaoping. Start by an excellent teacher’s guide with suggested lessons and themes for discussion as well as suggested readings. High school. Be aware of the fact that this is a part of PBS website. Reviewed from http://afe.easia.columbia.edu and Mary Anne Flournoy, 6/17/02.

Remembering Nagasaki (Indiana)

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Recommended because of its photo taken the day after the A-Bomb was dropped in Nagasaki. This site would be good for elementary, junior high, and high school students, although some photos may not be appropriate to them. Topics and materials included in this site are photo taken by Yosuke Yamahata and discussion forum about “Atomic Memories”. Start by “The photographs of Yosuke Yamahata” since this provides photos of Nagasaki after the A-Bomb was dropped and his brief comments. It would be better for teachers to look them through to see if it is appropriate to show the photos to your students beforehand. Be aware of the fact that some of the photos might not be appropriate for younger kids, so it would be better for teachers to look them through to see if it is appropriate to show the photos to your students beforehand. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Should the Ming End the Treasure Voyages? Jane Johnson, New York University.

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Recommended because this is a lesson plan for Middle School world history classes which examines the Chinese decision after 1415 to end their maritime voyages into the Indian Ocean, scrap their fleet, and forbid overseas trading. This was one of the most important decisions in modern history. This lesson presents the background surrounding the Chinese decision and asks students, as advisors to the Ming court, to advise the Emperor whether or not to end the voyages altogether. Pallop Willairat, a participant in an ORIAS Institute on Medieval Travelers adapted this lesson which is available at http://www.ias.berkeley.edu/orias/lessonplan.html. Both versions contain excellent maps and links to other sites for student research. Highly recommended. Start by “Background Information” as this section discusses historical background in the first century of Chinese Ming dynasty (1368-1644). Be aware of the fact that this page offers links to some maps of Indian Ocean, China, and South Asia.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/01/02.

Silence Broken

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Silence Broken shatters a half-century of silence for Korean women forced into sexual servitude by the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II. The women demand justice for the “crimes against humanity” committed against them, their compelling testimony is presented side by side with interviews of Japanese soldiers and recruiters. Some of their stories, portrayed in powerful dramatizations with their own voices flowing under stunning images, echo soulful sorrow and the amazing resilience of the human spirit. The visceral impact of the film was stronger than any work I?ve seen in years. There were moments that were so shattering for me that I had a hard time looking at it directly. But we must look at history, including evil. Thank you for this huge gift to humanity.
Reviewed by Lawrence H. Fuchs, Meyer and Walter Jaffe Professor of American Civilization and Politics, Brandeis University.

Media Type: Media

Silence Broken: Korea Comfort Women (1999)

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Recommended because essentially an oral history of Korean comfort women, the stories they told Dai Sil are the core of the book. Other chapters provide historical information. The raw stories of these women contain their flesh and blood. In addition, Kim-Gibson explores their lives before and after, as well as during, the forced servitude. Born in northern Korea when it was under Japanese rule, Kim-Gibson traveled to Korea, Japan and China to record their devastating stories. The women pour their hearts out as they tell stories about being taken from their homes, shipped like military supplies to far-off places, suffering the insufferable, and going home only to be silenced. Some say that we wretched Koreans – the people of Hahn (the everlasting woe) – have run out of tears. But to my wonderment, I found myself fighting tears as I turned pages of Dai Sil Kim-Gibson’s “Silence Broken.” More in shame and guilt for our stone-cold indifference to our own blood-and-flesh grandmas who have endured the unendurable. Destiny has willed this poet-philosopher-filmmaker to tell the stories of the ultimate Hahn to posterity, especially for children of an unrepentant neighbor whose leaders have been afflicted with a self-induced collective amnesia.
Reviewed by K.W. Lee, founding president of the Korean American Journalists Association.

Citation: Kim-Gibson, Dai Sil. Parkersburg, Iowa: Mid-Prairie Books ($15) ISBN: 0931209889

Media Type: Book

Silkroad Foundation (Oregon)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its wealth of materials about the Silkroad not found elsewhere. Among the treasures you will find at this site are a list of ancient travelers along the Silkroad prior to and succeeding Marco Polo through the seventeenth century with descriptions of their place of origin and mission. There are maps of foreign imports and trade routes into China during the Tang Dynasty, Turkic, Kirghyz, and Tajik folklore, and the origins of polo, chess and backgammon. The “links” section takes you to a list of links, the best of which is China Exploration and Research Society. That links you to pages set up by photographer and explorer Pamela Logan. It includes both pictures and narrative of her Silk Road journey, her many tours through China. She also gives tips for traveling in China. The Silkroad Foundation was set up in 1996 to maintain vital links to the Silkroad communities in the U.S. and abroad and keep abreast of the latest research and discoveries on the Silkroad. This site is recommended for middle school and high school. It provides excellent resources for a study of cultural contact and also expands the view of China through the information on ethnic minorities living along the Silkroad. Start by “Silk road” in “Timeline” as it provides silk road chronology starting with 5000 B.C. Be aware of the fact that this site provides numerous maps by trade routes, route maps, territories, empires, and period maps. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 6/16/02.

Teaching and Learning about Immigration: Process and Issues&After September 11: The National Peace Corps Association.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is a lesson plan to teach about immigration. The objective of this lesson plan is “After reading a short article from the Winter 2002 WorldView, students will do website research to learn more about gaining citizenship, role play citizenship interviews, read about and discuss current issues regarding immigration, and respond to a letter to the editor about immigrants.” Be aware of the fact that this lesson plan is designed for 2-3 class periods. It is recommended for junior and high school students. Reviewed by the National Peace Corps Association.

Citation: Wilson, Angene.

Media Type: Book

Teaching World History: A Resource Book. (1997).

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Recommended because it provides lesson plans and ideas that focus on cross-cultural exchange, global themes, and comparative analyses in order to teach historical thinking and inquiry. The book is divided into three parts: Part 1 explores approaches to teaching world history and provides world history curricular models; Part 2 explores world history topics and issues (i.e., gender, religion, art, environment, civilizations, political systems, literature, trade, technology, philosophy, etc.); Part 3 provides strategies and lessons for elementary through graduate-level students.

Citation: Roupp, Heidi (editor). Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharp.

Media Type: Book

The Burmese Harp (1956)

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Recommended because this film was made based on the novel Biruma no tategoto by Takeyama Nichio. The action takes place in Burma where the Japanese army is collapsing at the end of the World War II. A soldier who plays the Burmese harp, after being wounded and separated from his combat unit, is nursed back to health and wanders around reflecting on the cruelty of war. Recommended for Grades 9-16+.
Reviewed by University Center for International Studies (UCIS) of University of Pittsburgh.

Media Type: Media

The Cambridge Illustrated History of China (1999)

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Recommended because of a comprehensive history of China. “It dismantles notions of an unchanging monoculture and emphasizes diverse cultural forces that impinged on the lives of ordinary people. I takes into account not only politics and war, but also philosophy, religion, art, economics, women’s history, and the impact of cross-cultural influences. Also synthesizes recent advances in cultural studies. Advanced high school students and teachers.
Reviewed on the Social Studies School Services (SSSS) Website.
Available for $29.95 from Social Studies School Services: http://socialstudies.com

Citation: Ebrey, Patricia. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Media Type: Book

The Chinese Past: 6,000 Years of Art and Culture

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Recommended because this excellent slide/tape program, based on the Exhibit of the Archeological Finds of the People’s Republic of China that toured the United States in 1975, presents art objects from the Neolithic Period through the Yuan Dynasty, 14th century A.D.
Recommended for its excellent map and an outline of Chinese dynasties with representative art objects.
Reviewed in http://afe.easia.columbia.edu
Available from Educational Resources National Gallery of Art 6th and Constitution Avenue Washington, DC 20565
Tel. 202-842-6263 Price: Loaned for the cost of return postage only.

Media Type: Media

The Chinese Revolution (1993) (Films for the Humanities and Sciences) VHS, 36 minutes, English

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Recommended because this video documents the primary issues and events affecting the emergence of the People’s Republic of China. It also shows China’s intervention in the Korean War, the split between Beijing and Moscow, the occupation of Tibet, its development and testing of nuclear weapons, and Nixon’s visit to China. Finally it covers the Cultural Revolution, the death of Mao, and economic reforms of Den Xiaoping and the Tienanmen massacre. Recommended for secondary and above as an excellent overview of the shaping of modern China.
Reviewed in the EAP Resouce Lending Library Catalog at Cornell University. http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu/
Available on loan throughout the U.S.

Media Type: Media

The Chinese: Adapting the Past, Facing the Future (1991)

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Recommended because of its collection of primary source materials related to contemporary China. This textbook is divided into six sections: History and Geography, Politics, Society, The Economy, Culture, and the Future. Each section begins with an essay by one of the editors to provide context for the readings. Students are introduced to the complexities of contemporary China through source materials ranging from Mencius to Fan Lizhi and the best of modern Western and Chinese scholarship. Advance high school and teacher reference.
Reviewed from the Center for Chinese Studies Publications Catalog at the University of Michigan. Can be ordered on-line http://www.press.umich.edu

Citation: Dernberger et al, ( Ed.). Ann Arbor: U. of Michigan Press. $35.00

Media Type: Book

The Concept of Order in Ancient China

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Recommended because a goal of most world-history classes is to introduce students to the many ways humans have tried to create social order over time. In this unit, students learn about the Han Dynasty of China, which successfully united China for over 400 years (202 B.C. until 220 A.D.). Small-group activities requiring the use of multiple intelligences explore how the Chinese created unity through music, philosophy, politics, agriculture, and language. Includes an audio tape.
Reviewed in http://afe.easia.columbia.edu
Available for $34.95 from Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE) Encina Hall East, Ground Floor, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 9430Slavic and Eastern Europe-6055, Phone: 1-800-578-1114, Fax: (650) 723-6784

Citation: http://spice.stanford.edu/ldml/viewpub_sp.lasso?id=10100

Media Type: Book

The Conflict in the Middle East: Analyzing the Present, Prospects for the Future (2001)

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Recommended because of its compendium of publications on conflicts of the Middle East. Topics and materials include over eighty “For the Record” Summaries, Information Briefs, and Policy Briefs. Subjects include the Peace Process, US objectives in the Middle East, water issues, Israeli torture, democracy, religious dissonance, home demolitions, settlements, Palestinian Refugees, Israeli occupation, Arab-Israeli talks, and much more. Available for purchase from The Palestine Center. Go to their web site at www.palestinecenter.org/. This publication is also available for loan to central Ohio teachers through the OSU Middle East Studies Center. (See OSU under Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/28/02.

Citation: Wahington DC: The Center for Policy Analysis on Palestine. 229 pages. $24.95. (OSU)

Media Type: Book

The Cultural Revolution: Mao’s Last Battle (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) VHS: (series) – $269.95; DVD: (series) – $289.95

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Recommended because whether Mao Zedong launched a campaign of ideological purification in 1966 to keep China from becoming capitalist or to solidify his power remains a subject for debate. Only the disastrous consequences are certain. This series presents the definitive history of the Cultural Revolution, its background, and aftermath, blending an incredible array of documentary footage with discussion by Chinese contemporaries, diplomats, and scholars, including Roxanne Witke, the only Westerner to interview Mao

Media Type: Media

The Distortion and Revision of History in Postwar Japanese Textbooks (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its unique information about critical analysis of Japanese history textbooks. In fact, this site would be a good material that teachers read in order to learn about controversial issues of Japanese historical textbooks. Topics and materials included in this site are an academic article (based on a thesis written by Tomochika Okamoto) discussing the contents of high school Japanese history textbooks in the postwar era. Be aware of the fact that this site also offers his articles “Japanese Americans” in U.S. Hisotry Textbooks and History Textbooks of Japan and the U.S. in the Age of Globalization. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

The Genesis of East Asia, 221 B.C. – A.D. 907 (2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its efforts to present the historical interdependency of regional countries in East Asia between the past and the future. Topics and materials included in this book are (1) China Plural, (2) conceiving East Asia, (3) global connections, (4) “Barbarization” of Northern China, (5) before Vietnam, (6) the birth of Korea, and (7) Japan. Start by “Beyond East Asia: Global Connections” since this chapter describes of global connections of East Asian countries through foreign trade and Buddhist.

Citation: Holcombe, Charles. Honolulu : Association for Asian Studies and University of Hawai’i Press. $24.95.

Media Type: Book

The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its use of archaeology as an entry point for student understanding of ancient civilizations. An on-line exploration of objects from early Chinese culture and art from recent archaelogical discoveries. Exploration of achievement of Chinese civilizaton from the neolithic period into the Five Dynasties (5000 BCE to 960 CE). Topics and materials included in this site are objects & commentary: late prehistoric China, Bronze age China, Chu and other cultures, and early imperial China, teaching activities, resources, chronology, and pronunciation guide / glossary. In addition to the on-line program there is a 20-slide, 48-page booklet which can be borrowed free of charge. Start byTeaching Activities” as it provides various activities to teach Archaeology, and Chinese and other cultures. Be aware of the fact that NGA kids presents a list of upcoming programs, films, and events for kids.

The Harvard Fairbank Center Virtual Library

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Recommended because of a site rich in resources on modern China, beginning with the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) to the present. Start by clicking on either Qing Dynasty, Republican Era or People’s Republic of China and find treasures such as pictures related to China’s history, the 1937 Time Man and Woman of the Year featuring General and Madame Chiang Kai-shek. Be aware of the fact that the Bookshelf at the top of the page-it only leads you to Amazon.com. This was originally reviewed by Indiana University East Asian Studies Center Select Bibliography of Resources-China.

The People’s Republic of China: Who Should Own the Land?

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is a highly participatory unit which gives students the opportunity to analyze the issue of land distribution in China since 1940. Students are assigned to each of the four major social classes of China in the 1940s and receive shares of “land” in proportion to Chinese land distribution at that time, to dramatize the wide disparities in land distribution. They read primary sources depicting the impoverished state of Chinese peasants in 1947 and follow Mao Tse-Tung’s sweeping land-reform movement by reading “Stone Village,” a fictionalized account of the kind of violent turn that land reform often took. Students analyze an article from the Beijing Review, written by a farmer who became wealthy as a result of the “Family Responsibility System” which allowed him to engage in private chicken farming. Grades 7-10. Reviewed in http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/

Citation: National Center for History in the Schools, University of California at Los Angeles.

Media Type: Book

The Poetry of Wang Wei (1980)

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Recommended because one of the representative poets of the “Golden Age of Chinese Poetry” in the Tang dynasty, Wang Wei (710-761) demonstrates various currents of the period, as he was a statesman, courtier, musician, recluse, and Buddhist. A master of poetic craft, Wang Wei is best known for his nature poetry, which express a harmony between the observer and the observed; yet his involvement in political affairs adds tension to the apparently simple style.
Reviewed by East Asian Project of Columbia University. http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/

Citation: Pauline Yu (translator). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Media Type: Book

The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia

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Recommended because Recommended because it is considered to be one of the best books written on the subject of the civil wars that plagued Yugoslavia in the 1990s. A British journalist for the respected Times of London and the Economist draws upon his experience of living in Belgrade and reporting on the disintegration of Yugoslavia. A critically acclaimed and comprehensive account of the self-destruction of Yugoslavia due to unrestrained ethnic conflict. Available from Amazon.com for $11.17.Reviewed by Bill Wolf, April 2002; updated August 2003.

Citation: Tim Judah, Yale University Press (1997)

Media Type: Book

Through Chinese Eyes (1989)

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Recommended because of its collection of primary source readings focusing on traditional and contemporary Chinese history from the Chinese point-of-view.
Reviewed from China: A Teaching Workbook. http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/mainframe.htm/
Available for $19 from — Center for International Training and Education P.O. Box 337 Croton-on-Hudson, NY 10520 Phone: (800) 316-2739

Citation: Seybolt, Peter. Croton-on-Hudson, New York, Center for International Training and Education.

Media Type: Book

Through Japanese Eyes (1994)

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Recommended because this volumes covers traditional and contemporary Japan by letting the Japanese speak for themselves. Incorporates fiction, poetry, newspaper and magazine articles, letter, diaries, and historical documents. The work deals with Japan’s economic, political, social, and cultural life.
Reviewed by East Asian Studies Center Indiana University.

Citation: Minear, Richard. Croton-on-Hudson, New York, Center for International Training and Education ($21.95).

Media Type: Book

Tienanmen-1989

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site contains large numbers of pictures from the 1989 incident and provides links to activities and perspectives of Chinese dissidents. Be aware of the fact that this site is a joint project of Support Democracy in China and Christus Rex et Redemptor Mundi, based in Silicon Valley. Also, there are some photos not appropriate for younger kinds. Recommended for high school.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/06/02.

Timeasia.com: Vision of China: Fifty Places Where History was Made

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Recommended because of its place-based approach to the history of the last 50 years in China. Start by clicking on a map of the provinces to find out more about each one and the places that were significant in the history of the PRC. Be aware of the fact that the site portrays the diversity of China. Recommended for Middle school/high school.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/08/02.

Timeline of Chinese History

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Recommended because a good overview of Chinese history. Includes Chinese dynasty dates and names, both in Chinese and pin-yin. Also features a historical description about each dynasty and corresponding map. Recommended for advanced middle school/high school world history courses. Be aware of the fact that this site recommends “Era and Timeline of Chinese History.” Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/03/02.

Today in Asian History

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Recommended because of a growing resource providing information about events and trends from the past, with an eye on their enduring legacy. Includes links to related websites. It is indexed by calendar month. You click on a day in a month and receive a summary of events in Asian history from that date. Recommended for high school or middle school. Start by making students explore their birth days to learn what happened in Asia at that time. Be aware of the fact that this site offers a link to Educational Resources on Asia at UCLA Center for East Asian Studies at the bottom. This resource was originally reviewed by the UCLA East Asia Center Resources index.

Understanding the Geography of China: An Assemblage of Pieces (1999)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because an overview of the regions of China with maps and pictures. Excellent list of resources included.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/10/02.

Citation: McColl, Robert. Education about Asia, 4(2). http://www.aasianst.org/EAA/mccoll.htm

Media Type: Book

Understanding the Korean Peninsula in the 21st Century: Political, Economic, and Security Issues in the Asia/Pacific Region.

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Recommended because this includes a topic: What opportunities and challenges does the 21st century hold for the Korean Peninsula? Engaging activities on the Japanese colonization of the Korean Peninsula and the Korean War set the historical context for an examination of this question. Lessons engage students in a news conference on the Korean Peninsula’s current political situation; a role play introduces the Korean Peninsula’s economic situation; a peace conference; an examination of civil rights and Korean residents in Japan; and a consideration of scenarios for Korean reunification. Recommended for secondary grades (advanced) and adult. 190 pages ($49.95) Available at SPICE.
Reviewed by UCLA Center for East Asian Studies.

Citation: Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE) $49.95

Media Type: Book

Visible Traces

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site contains a well developed curriculum guide to the Visible Traces which links ancient civilizations to contemporary history through a focus on human communication. The Reflecting Diversity module has good coverage of China’s ethnic minorities. A complete curriculum guide can be downloaded. Aimed at grades 6-12, the five themes addressed are Mapping One’s Place in the World, Communicating Through Writing and Technology, Making Values Tangible Through Word and Image, Reflecting Diversity Through Language and Writing, and Expressing Individuality Through Poetry and Calligraphy. Each section includes an introduction to the theme, background essays by eminent scholars, and two or three classroom activities. Every lesson is a comprehensive, classroom-ready packet featuring intriguing artifacts, rich reference material, and detailed plans that fit readily into your curriculum. Start by introduction for the theme good for your students since it link you directly to appropriate objects in the Visible Traces exhibition. Very innovative multimedia unit that can be used in world history, geography and literature classes. Be aware of the fact that you need Adobe Acrobat Reader to download some teaching materials in this site. This site was originally reviewed from the introduction to the curriculum guide.

Visions of China

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Recommended because this is a highly interactive site which can be navigated by students easily. A collaboration of CNN, Time, Asiaweek and Fortune in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the PRC. The site contains a map of the provinces, a feature on the dynasties of China, commentaries on contemporary China, art in China, and games and other features especially appealing to middle school/high school.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/08/02. Start by “Photos: Faces of China” in “Inside China” as it offers photos of China for 50 years. Be aware of the fact that this site provides “flash intro” presenting brief introduction about China.

Voices of Hibakusha (Indiana)

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Recommended because it provides voices of victims by the atomic bomb. This site would be good for elementary, junior high, and high school students to learn about what happened to bomb victims at and after the time when the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. The topics and materials included in this site are true stories of 15 victims and a statement of peace declaration in August 6, 1990. Start by any story of victims to present your students. Or it is recommended to make your students select stories that they want to read. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Welcome to Edo (Stanford)

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Recommended because of its significant information about Edo period (1600-1868) in Japanese history and effort to visualize the Edo (current Tokyo) area. This site would be good for elementary, junior high, and high school students to learn about the lives of the people lived in Edo period. The topics and materials included in this site are a large map of Edo area, information about important places, Ukiyo-e pictures portraying the places, the gallery of arts produced by some of the Edo finest artists and craftsmen (http://www.us-japan.org/EdoMatsu/Home/art.html), and related links for further information about Edo period in Japanese history. Start by “Help” if you visit this site for the first time since it provides basic instruction of how you can explore this site. Be aware of the fact that there are some hidden messages or other surprises in Ukiyo-e pictures if you point at them with a pointer. This resource was originally recommended by the Center for East Asian Studies at Stanford University.

Women in Japan: From Ancient Times to the Present (1987)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this work looks at women and gender roles in Japan, from female gods and empresses, to the daily life of women in contemporary Japan.
Reviewed by East Asian Studies Center of Indiana University.

Citation: Bingham, Wall & Gross, Susan. St. Louis Park, MN: Women in World Area Studies; Glenhurst Publications. $18.00.

Media Type: Book

World Civilizations: An Internet Classroom and Anthology

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its integrated coverage of world civilizations and it links to resources. Excellent for comparative purposes in a world history course. Topics and materials included in this site are a glossary of Chinese culture and history; a list of web resources on Chinese history; and an anthology of Chinese readings that include writings by Confucius, Lao Tse, and an excerpt from the Qing dynasty novel Dream of the Red Chamber. There are also links to Japan and Korea. Start by clicking “Browse, Contents” and then “The Learning Modules” to obtain resources for learning about ancient China, imperial China, Ming China, Ch’ing (Qing) China, and Chinese philosophical traditions. Be aware of the fact that “The Learning Modules” includes resources about other regions. Reviewed from China: A Teaching Workbook, Traditional History section. http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/mainframe.htm/ (not working)