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AATSEEL

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is the website of AATSEEL, the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages. This organization is more oriented toward college instructors of Russian and other East European languages than secondary school teachers, but even secondary school teachers should be aware of this association and what it does. Unfortunately, there is very little here of interest to students. Start by clicking on the Why Join? section to learn about the benefits of membership in AATSEEL. Be aware of the fact that this website contains many sections that may be of interest: for example, there is the Directory of Pre-College Teachers of Russian in the Departments and Programs section, as well as the Language Programs for Middle and High School Students in the same section. Listed separately are sections like, Resources for Teaching, Why Study Russian?, and Internet Resources, to mention just a few.

ACTR

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is the website of ACTR, the American Council of Teachers of Russian. This organization provides a multitude of information and programs of interest to Russian language teachers and students. Start by reading the home page to get an idea of the basic mission of this organization, then have a look at the Programs, Language Learning, and Services sections for a more concrete idea of how ACTR can aid you and your Russian language program. Be aware of the fact that you can become a member of ACTR, so have a look at the Membership section for details on how this might benefit you.

Alexander Nevsky

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because because this 1938 film classic depicts the famous Battle of Tannenberg (1240) where Russian forces led by Prince Aleksandr Nevsky defeated the invading German forces, and in the process, prevented Russia from being converted from Eastern Orthodoxy to Roman Catholicism. One of the greatand most celebrated battles in all of Russian history, this film is by master director Sergei Eisenstein who with Nevsky created just one of his many masterpieces. This already exceptional film is enhanced by the terrific musical score by the great Russian composer, Sergei Prokovief. 107 min, Suitable for viewing by high school and junior high school students. Be aware of the fact that this film is available from Amazon.com for $23.

Media Type: Media

An Anthology of Russian Literature from Earliest Writings to Modern Fiction : Introduction to a Culture

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Recommended because Recommended as a collection of some of the most important works in Russian literature. Arrangement of the selections is chronological and each section places the literary works in their historical context and notes later cultural resonances. Following each text is an introductory guide to primary and secondary sources, including available aesthetic transformations of the work, its subjects, and its motifs in film, video, musical recordings, and art collections. These listings helpfully emphasize Russian rather than non-Russian responses in the arts (e.g. Sergei Bondarchuk’s film adaptation of War and Peace rather than the American version). Professor Rzhevsky is in the Russian department at SUNY, Stony Brook. Available from Amazon.com for $40. Reviewed by Bill Wolf, May 2002, updated 2003.

Citation: Nicholas Rzhevsky (Editor), M.E. Sharpe (1997)

Media Type: Book

Anastasia

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this website was created by a twenty-eight year old Russian woman from Kazan, and it provides lots of information about Russian culture and Russian life. The very thoughtful text is accompanied by excellent photographs. There are also sections on the Russian language as well as Russian literature, in addition to lots of information about Kazan, the capital of Tatarstan, a very interesting and important region of Russia. Start by clicking on the About section to learn more about Anastasia. Be aware of many of the sections of this website have subsections, so it is even larger than it appears at first glance. Also, there is a Guestbook section where you can write to Anastasia and read the comments of other visitors to this site.

Beloe sol’ntze pustiny (White Sun of the Desert)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this may very well be the most popular Russian film of all time. It is the kind of film that many Russians have seen so many times, many of the phrases from the film have become common sayings (for example, za derzhava, obydno or Vostok, delo tonkoe). This is the story of a Red Army officer during the Russian Civil War who is serving far from his home in the hot desert sands of Central Asia. Runs 85 minutes and was made in the sixties. Suitable for viewing by high school and junior high school students. Be aware of this film is available from Amazon.com for $27.

Media Type: Media

Berlitz Basic Russian

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Recommended because because this is one of the most time tested Russian language instruction texts. Along with the texts are audio cassettes which allow the student to teach him or herself the language. Berlitz may be too old fashioned in its pedagogy for some, but many find it very useful for learning Russian. Be aware of the fact that this book is available from Amazon.com for $23.

Citation: Berlitz Guides, 1997

Media Type: Book

Brother (Brat) (1997)

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Recommended because this is a film set in post-Soviet St. Petersburg. The story begins as a young soldier returns to civilian life by working with his older brother as a hired assassin. This film has become a cult classic in Russia. It is very good for getting a glimpse at the darker side of life in post-Soviet Russia, a life that is replete with drugs, gangsters, violence, and a lack of a sense of purpose (i.e., the changes that cause many older Russians to want to return to the “good old days” of communism when life was more orderly, there was less crime, and one did not see gangsters dining in restaurants or speeding by in foreign luxury cars. Even though this film portrays the “New” Russia, one should not think that this movie portrays “typical” life in Russia in the late 1990s. Directed by Aleksei Balabanov (95 minutes). In Russian with English subtitles. Available for loan from the Ohio State University Center for Slavic and East European Studies (call 614-292-8770 or write Keisel.1@osu.edu), or for purchase from Facets Multimedia for $80.

Media Type: Media

Conradish.net

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this website provides the literary texts of twenty-one Russian authors in the original Russian. Of course this site will be useful only for advanced students, but it is a tremendous resource and even beginning and intermediate students may want to access it to see first hand what good Russian literature looks like. Start by clicking on any writer you are interested in. You will then see a list of all the works by that author that are included in the website (under Dostoevsky one finds seven separate works, including The Brothers Karamazov and Crime and Punishment. Be aware of the fact that this website is maintained by Chung W. Leong, who apparently was (and perhaps still is) a student at the University of California at Berkeley.

Cultural Atlas of Russia and the Former Soviet Union (Cultural Atlas Series)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this publication (revised 1998 edition) is a dazzling display of the history and culture of Russia and the former Soviet Union through 50 maps and 300 photographs (200 in color). A survey of Russian civilization from prehistory to the present. Be aware of the fact that this resource is available from Amazon.com for $35. Originally reviewed by Bill Wolf, April 2002.

Citation: R. R. Milner-Gulland, Nikalai Dijeuski, Robin Miner-Gulland, Nikolai Dejevsky; 240 pages

Media Type: Book

Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a global science education site. GLOBE is a partnership between schools, colleges & universities, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration, (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and 95 other countries. The purpose of this partnership is engage students in the scientific study of the environment through research-based initiative and activities that focus on advocacy and the training of future researchers for industry, academia, and government. Start with the Teachers Guide link for education resources. This site is an excellent resource for science teachers!  Be aware this site is especially useful for educators of elementary and secondary students.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Global Voices

Posted by: globaledadmin on Saturday, February 4, 2012

Recommended because Global Voices is an online community of bloggers around the world who are not part of the international mainstream media.  Representing “average” citizens around the world, Global Voices allows perspectives to be shared, encourages freedom of expression, and advocates for the protection of free speech rights. Reviewed by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Golosa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because because this basic Russian language instruction text is widely used and respected in the United States. Here is a description of the book from the book’s website: “Golosa” is a basic course in Russian. Students successfully completing a course taught in concert with both Books 1 and 2 can expect to reach the ACTFL Intermediate range in speaking and Intermediate High in reading and listening. Each volume of Golosa includes a main textbook, and a student workbook with laboratory drills and written exercises. The audio program runs approximately 15 hours per volume and includes listening comprehension exercises, speaking dialogues, and rapid-pace oral drills. Teachers adopting Golosa can download the audio from the Golosa website or order CDs of the audio program from Prentice Hall. Teachers receive desk copies plus access to the on-line Instructor’s Manual with tape scripts and keys to the audio comprehension exercises.” Be aware of the fact that this book is available from Amazon.com for $75 (book one).

Citation: Robin, Richard; Karen Evans-Romaine; Galina Shatalina; Joanna Robin; and Kathryn Henry Prentice Hall

Media Type: Book

History of Russia

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is a very detailed and hyperlinked account of Russian history from 860 to the post-Soviet period. Start by scrolling down to the “Contents” section which shows in a glance the various periods and subjects covered. Be aware of the fact that this webpage is part of the free online encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Interactive Online Russian Reference Grammar

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is probably the very best Russian grammar manual on the Internet. Not only is the manual large and comprehensive, it is beautifully done with color, graphics, and photographs. Furthermore, it is interactive, so students can test themselves online to verify their understanding of grammar rules after reading each section. This is a wonderful resource! Start by scrolling down the Table of Contents to find a subject of interest and then click on it. Be aware of the fact that this website was produced at Bucknell University by Professor Robert Beard. As such, it is part of the fabulous Bucknell University Russian Program website.

Ironiia sudby ili s legkim parom (The Irony of Fate)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is the most loved New Year’s film in Russian history, it can be likened to the American equivalent of the Christmas film, It’s a Wonderful Life. For many Russians, it is a tradition to view this film at the end of the year. Great for getting insight into Russian culture (for example, the Russian sauna scene) as well as Soviet culture (the uniformity of Soviet life). Made in the 1970s, runs about three hours long, and is suitable for viewing by high school and junior high school students. Be aware of the fact that this film on DVD is available from for $40, but can be borrowed free from several Russian studies centers at major universities throughout the United States.

Media Type: Media

Learn Russian from Ilike2learn.com

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this website is good for learning first year level Russian vocabulary words. Divided into several lessons, each one is like a slide show of Russian vocabulary words which are displayed and spoken (by a native Russian speaker). Each lesson also has an interactive quiz. Start by clicking on the Learn the Letters’ Names and Where They Are Located on the Keyboard section. Be aware of the fact that this website is part of the larger Ilike2learn.com website which also features interactive geography quizzes.

Learn to Read Russian

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Recommended because a simple, but effective website for helping students to learn the Cyrillic alphabet. The idea is to let beginning students try for themselves to make heads or tails of Russian words after explaining to them, one at a time, how to read Cyrillic letters. It is a primitive, but very interesting and presumably useful method. Be aware of that there is only one (long) page here–no hyper-links or multimedia effects, but the page is very cleverly designed and should hold the interest of beginning students.

Letiat zhuravlei (The Cranes Are Flying)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is one of the very best Russian movies made about the Second World War. A tragic story of a young Muscovite couple separated by the war, this is a classic Russian film. Made in 1958, the movie runs about 94 minutes– and is suitable for viewing by high school and junior high school students. Be aware of the fact that this film is available on DVD from Amazon.com for $27.

Media Type: Media

Life in Russia: Interviews, Video Shots, Articles

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because as the title implies, this website provides information on everyday life in Russia through interviews with Russians and videoclips of ordinary life. Start by by clicking on the Russian People section to read transcripts of interviews with dozens of Russians from all walks of life. Be aware of the fact that this website is part of the excellent waytorussia.net website, which is a huge and valuable resource for those considering traveling to Russia.

MasterRussian.com

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Recommended because this website provides a range of materials for students of Russian, from tutorials for beginners, to dozens of links to online resources relating to Russian language and culture. Start by clicking on the Russian-Basic section for online tutorials for Russian language beginners, but be sure to check out the multitude of other categories listed on the left side of the screen. Be aware of the fact that this website is commercial, so there are goods and services advertised here, but in a fairly unobtrusive way.
s good for learning first year level Russian vocabulary words. Divided into several lessons, each one is like a slide show of Russian vocabulary words which are displayed and spoken (by a native Russian speaker). Each lesson also has an interactive quiz.

Moscow and Leningrad: The Crown Jewels of Russia (1990)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this film is part of the superb “Video Visits” series. The film starts in Moscow where the Kremlin, Red Square, Lenin’s Tomb, St. Basil’s Cathedral, the Bolshoi Ballet, the Moscow Circus, Gorky Park and GUM are all featured. In Leningrad one sees Palace Square, the Winter Palace with its Hermitage Museum as well as Peter the Great’s fabulous retreat, Petrodvorets (50 minutes). Available for free loan from the Ohio State University Center for Slavic and East European Studies (call 614-292-8770 or write to: Keisel.1@osu.edu), or may be purchased from Amazon.com for $25.

Media Type: Media

Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears (1979)

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Recommended because this romantic comedy was probably the most popular movie in Russia during the Brezhnev era (sold 75 million tickets) and winner of the 1980 Academy Award for Best Foreign Film. In Moscow in 1958, three small-town girls have just arrived to pursue their dreams. Ludmila is determined to land a rich boyfriend, Tonya settles for a stable marriage to a working class man, while Katerina gets pregnant. She will eventually make it to the top twenty years later. In the process, this realistic movie will help American students see that life under Soviet socialism was not all drab and dull and that in many ways, it was similar to life in the West. But it also shows well Russian culture, for example life at a country “dacha,” a shish-kabob picnic in the woods, Russian drinking habits, Russia’s more traditional values when it comes to relations between men and women, and much more. In Russian with English subtitles. Available for loan from the Ohio State University Center for Slavic and East European Studies (call 614-292-8770 or write Keisel.1@osu.edu), or for purchase from Facets Multimedia for $25.

Media Type: Media

Moscow Life: Matreshka, Kremlin, banya, vodka, bears&

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this website contains over fifty stories about everyday life in Moscow in particular, and Russia in general. Written in English by Russian journalist Andrey Sebrant, these articles provide a remarkable window on life in Russia. Not only is Sebrant’s writing superb, it is accompanied by lots of photographs, so students can get a real sense of everyday life in Russia. Start by scrolling down the page to the Table of Contents where the titles of the stories are listed. Simply click on any story that is of interest. Be aware of the fact that there is also a Russian Language version of this site.

Nachalo

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is one of the standard Russian language instruction textbooks for American students. Here is the publisher’s description: “Available in a 2-volume format, Nachalo is the most exciting text available for beginning Russian courses. Written by a respected team of Russian scholars and linguists, Nachalo presents grammar functionally and teaches students the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing within the context of a wealth of cultural information.
The abundant practice material in Nachalo ranges from focused and controlled to open-ended and communicative. Nachalo features an on-going story set in Russia with a cast of Russian and American characters, exposing students to new vocabulary and structures in authentic situations. Most exciting of all, Nachalo includes the most extensive package of support materials for any beginning Russian text on the market, including a video tied specifically to the text, shot on location in Moscow. The Second Edition is even more powerful with a text-specific Website and an all new student CD-ROM.” Be aware of Professor George Mitrevski of Auburn University has produced a very useful online study guide for Nachalo. Available from Amazon.com for $75 (book one).

Citation: Lubensky, Sophia, Gerard L. Ervin, et al. McGraw-Hill

Media Type: Book

News of the Week in Simplified Russian

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is a terrific website to listen to recent news broadcasts in a slower and simpler Russian. Each broadcast (with audio but no video) also has a vocabulary list to aid students’ understanding of the news story. Obviously this site is not for beginning Russian students but certainly would be useful for second year and later students. It provides a great transition to listening to actual Russian news broadcasts which usually are read so quickly that most intermediate students would find them intimidating in addition to being incomprehensible. Start by reading the text of the main page which explains the rationale of the website, the source of the news stories, etc., and then choose a broadcast to listen to in the Current Webcasts column on the left side of the screen. Be aware of the fact that this website is a project of the National Capital Language Resource Center which apparently is based at George Washington University.

Russia: Discovering Russia (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because part of the “Video Visits” series, this well-made travelogue not only vividly shows the diverse Russian landscape and major Russian cities, it effectively integrates Russian culture and history into the film as well. Highly recommended for classroom use as an introduction to Russia (60 minutes). In English. Available for free loan from the Ohio State University Center for Slavic and East European Studies (call 614-292-8770 or write to: Keisel.1@osu.edu) or may be purchased from Access Russia for $25.

Media Type: Media

Russian Conversational Text Online

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this website contains the entire text of a Russian language conversation course. There’s nothing fancy here, no multimedia, no sound, no pictures, no video, just text. But it is very well organized. This site would be good for students who have already mastered the Cyrillic alphabet and who have a vocabulary of at least a few dozen Russian words. By the way, the textbook itself is entirely in Russian, thought the preface is in English. Start by clicking on Enter then clicking on the picture of the Bolshoi Theatre to get to the hyperlinked Table of Contents. Be aware of the fact that this text was created by Yegeniy Shtepan of the Pagoda Language Institute in Seoul, South Korea. This explains why much of the conversational material is organized with a Korean context.

Russian Federation Maps

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Recommended because this website contains a number of excellent maps of the Russian Federation as well as a great deal of basic information about Russia. The website also has links to maps of other countries that border Russia (and even many that don’t). Start by clicking on Russian map (large). Be aware of the fact that this website is part of the WorldAtlas.com website, a very fine source for information on world geography.

Russian for Russians

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this website is designed for heritage Russian language students, i.e., those students who are born into Russian speaking families in the United States and who speak Russian, but who have never had any formal instruction in the Russian language. The site is divided into eight separate units or lessons, beginning with the Russian alphabet. This is a very well-made website, as each unit has audio files made by native Russian speakers to accompany the text, ad there is an emphasis on materials that are important to Russian culture, like the poetry of Pushkin and folk tales. Start by clicking on the Lesson One which deals with the alphabet. You will quickly discover that this lesson is both fundamental and very sophisticated at the same time and is sure to hold the interest of heritage students. Be aware of the fact that this website was produced by the German and Slavic Department at George Washington University.

Russian Internet

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this website provides access to a multitude of online outlets for Russian television, radio, news and more. Obviously beginning students will not be able to watch Russian television with much comprehension, but they will find it interesting nonetheless. They will likely enjoy Russian radio even more, especially popular music. Start by by clicking on Russian Radio and choose the first radio station (Russkoe Radio) to listen to perhaps the most popular radio station in Russia for young people–it specializes in playing only Russian (i.e., no foreign) music. Be aware of the fact that this website has other features in addition to the radio and television stations. Teachers and students might enjoy exploring the other sections.

Russian Language Learning on the Web

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Recommended because this excellent website combines study of Russian literature with Russian language instruction. Four Russian authors are featured (Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy, and Blok) and the work of each author is divided into several separate instruction units, including text, translation, criticism, history, exercises, as well as audio and absolutely superb video files. There are even interactive quizzes to test the student’s comprehension. This is a superb website, definitely suitable for intermediate to advanced students, but there is much here that would even interest beginning students who are fond of Russian poetry. Start by clicking on Introduction to get a better idea of how the website is organized. Be aware of the fact that this website is was produced by the Russian language faculty at the University of Sussex, which, alas, recently dismantled its Russian language program.

Russian Language Lessons

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Recommended because this ia a good Russian language tutorial for beginning and intermediate students of Russian. There is a special emphasis here on Russian culture, especially Russian literature, drama, and music, which is an important component of the lessons. The lessons are divided into six categories: Russian in Dialogues, Russian for Businessmen, Russian for You, Russian Theatre, Russian for Tourists, and Talking about Russian Language. Be aware of the fact that this language instruction website is not yet finished, though many components are already in place. Produced by the Russian government’s international broadcasting service, the Voice of Russia (Radio Golos Rossii).

Russian Language Mentor

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Recommended because this is a self-paced language maintenance and development curriculum designed for intermediate to advanced students of Russian. The website includes separate sections for reading comprehension, listening comprehension, grammar review, cultural literacy (written in English), as well as scientific and technical literacy. Start by taking note that there are also crossword puzzles available for developing vocabulary, a sharing Internet resources section, and several “recreational-yet-edifying sites” in the Irregardless Gallery at the Boris and Gleb Tea Room, including collections of linguistic bloopers, palindromes and tongue twisters. Be aware of clicking on the Description section to get a better idea of how to use this very impressive resource.

Russian Revolutions: Nightline (2000)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because these are well-made documentaries on contemporary Russia produced by ABC News “Nightline.” Each program is 30 minutes long. Available for free loan from the Ohio State University Center for Slavic and East European Studies (call 614-292-8770 or write to: Keisel.1@osu.edu), or may be purchased from ABC News . Each episode is $30, or the entire six part series is $110. The various episodes are: Part I: Sexual Freedom — At a Price; Part II: A Free Press — If You Can Afford It; Part III: The Russian Army Fights for Its Life; Part IV: Crime, Corruption, and the High Price of Doing Business; Part V: Boris Berezovsky: The Unseen Power; Part VI: Vladimr Putin: The Man, The Legend.

Media Type: Media

Russnet

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this website is has a multitude of online resources for Russian instructors and students. The resources are organized into separate units called modules, and the topics of the modules include Business Russian, Anton Chekhov, A Cultural Map of Russia, Russian Fairytales, the Pugachev Rebellion, and several more. Start by clicking on the Register button, as one must register to gain access to the modules. Registration, however, is free, and in the process, one also makes sure that one’s computer has the necessary Cyrillic fonts. Be aware of the fact that Russnet is funded in part by the Ford Foundation and is sponsored as well by Other sponsors of Russnet include the Department of Education, ACTR, NEH and FIPSE.

SAPE

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Recommended because SAPE matches people from the United States with penpals in the fomer Soviet Union (including Russia and all fourteen of the other former Soviet Republics). It provides this service with the goal of fostering international understanding and educating people about the former Soviet Union on a one-to-one basis. Be aware of the fact, however, that e-mail is not used. Rather, penpals write to each other by postal mail only. The program is for ages 8 and older (adults as well as children); penpals usually write in English, although SAPE is always looking for Americans who can write in Russian; penpals are matched on the basis of age, common language, and choice of male or female penpal.

Sibirskii tsirul’nik (The Barber of Siberia)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is a fairly recent Russian film that tries to undo the propaganda of the Soviet period and show that Russians have much to be proud of when it comes to their country and its culture in the late 19th Century (the communists tended to portray Russia as backward and reactionary in the late 19th and early 20th centuries). This epic film has many memorable scenes, but the depiction of the Maslinitsa winter festival is especially notable. A great epic story of a tragic love affair of an honorable, young Russian army cadet and an older and more cynical American woman. Beyond the story, many Russian cultural insights are provided in this three hour film, suitable for viewing by high school and junior high school students. Produced in 1998. Be aware of the fact that this film is available on DVD from Amazon.com for $21.

Media Type: Media

Theale Green Community School Russian Pages

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because two big reasons: this website provides Russian language instruction for the very earliest beginners (up to and including the intermediate level, referred to here as “improvers”) and the website is full of quizzes on dozens of subjects that students can take and then have automatically graded for them. Start by going to the section which tests students’ general knowledge of Russia or by choosing the section on the Russian alphabet. Be aware of the fact that there are links to Russian language radio and television broadcasts at the bottom of the page. This website was produced in England (Theale, Berkshire, to be exact).

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

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Recommended because this museum, located in Washington, DC, provides comprehensive history, database, photos, stories, and maps about Nazi holocaust. Topics and materials included in this site are resources for teachers (on-line workshop, exemplary lessons, and resource book) and students (on-line activities, encyclopedia, and learning site) discussing holocaust. In addition to Jewish, this site also covers holocaust history of other groups such as Roma (Gypsies), the handicapped, Slavic people (Poles, Russians, and others), Communists, Socialists, Jehovah’s witnesses, and homosexuals. Be aware of the useful information that through learning center, other issues related to holocaust such as refugees, Nazi camps, forced labors, Mosaic victims, Einsatzgruppen (mobile killing units), rescue, and war crime trials, etc. are also included. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Why Study Russian?

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Recommended because this website gives great information on why the study of the Russian language is useful and important. This information is good both for Russian language teachers and students. Start by by clicking on Why Did We Study Russian?, the first of eleven separate sections, many of which contain hyperlinks to related websites. Be aware of that this site is sponsored by AATSEEL (the American Association for Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages) and ACTR (the American Council for Teachers of Russian).