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A 1 Book – Japan (1997)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book is a fascinating series for early readers that discusses the history, geography, economy, people, and culture of Japan. With large, simple text, maps, illustrations, and great photographs, young ones will get a true picture of life in Japan. 7 x 8.25. 48 pp. Ages 6-9. Be aware of the fact that “A 1 Book – China” is also available.
Reviewed by Asia for Kids.

Citation: Heinrichs, Ann. Children’s Press

Media Type: Book

A is for Asia (1997)

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Recommended because this book introduces Asian products, cultures, and festivals in an alphabetical order. This book would be good for low elementary school students. Topics and materials included in this book are a brief description or explanation on the introduced products, cultures, and festivals, and their names in original languages.

Citation: Chin-lee, C. New York: Orchard Books ($5.95)

Media Type: Book

A Life Like Mine

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, March 3, 2010

A Life Like Mine tells the story of how children live around the world through four themes:  survival, development, protection, participation.  Excellent images and text suitable for upper elementary and middle school students. Truly has a global perspective. Includes many visuals and maps.

Is is published by UNICEF.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

A Visit to Japan (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because early readers can now tour this Country and see the famous sites, join in the celebrations, and take a peek at children in school, and learn some words from that culture. These factual books include maps, big, colorful photographs, simple text, important facts about the countries, and a glossary. A perfect introduction to these amazing cultures. Ages 4-7. 7.25″ x 10.5″ . 32 pp. Be aware of the fact that “A Visit to China” is also available.
Reviewed by Asia for Kids.

Citation: Roop, Peter., & Roop, Connie. Heinemann Educational Books

Media Type: Book

American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it offers a variety of cultural exchange programs and educational opportunities throughout the world for American and International students and au pairs.  Programs include study abroad, Summer Institute for the Gifted (ages 4-17), University prep, Camp America, Global Insurance Coverage, Au Pairs, and educational group tours for all ages. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Asia Video Reports – Japan (2000)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this video report was designed by this module having students analyze Japanese culture by looking at Japanese food, housing, arts, and festivals. Grades: Slavic and Eastern Europe-12. Module themes include: tradition and change, daily life as a reflection of cultural values, and transmission of culture from generation to generation. Report includes a 1Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute videotape of four-to-five short video segments on a topic, plus an accompanying teacher’s guide with readings, lesson plans, classroom activities, and Internet resources. Videos include:
Asia Video Reports Food
Asia Video Reports Housing
Asia Video Reports Arts and Crafts
Asia Video Reports Festivals
Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

Ask Asia: Adult Free Zone

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this offers links to pen pals, origami instructions, traditional Asian games, downloadable images, and a place where kids can submit their own questions. Start by E-Pals’ provides three links to the websites offering e-pal programs around the world. Be aware of the fact that pop quizzes on Asian countries are provided in a ‘Test Your Knowledge’ section in the ‘Activity Corner.’
This resource was written by the Asian Educational Media Service University of Illinois.

Big Bird in China (1991) Random House/Children’s Television Workshop

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because in this 7Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute video produced by the Children’s Television Workshop, Big Bird and Barkley the dog travel to China where they visit with schoolchildren, learn some Chinese words and songs, watch a tai chi demonstration, and meet the mischievous Monkey King. Grades: K-4.
Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

Big Bird in Japan (1991) Random House/Children’s Television Workshop

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Recommended because in this 60-minute Children’s Television Workshop video, Big Bird explores some of Japan’s famous sights, meets a Japanese family, and learns some Japanese words and customs. He also meets a young woman who turns out to be the legendary moon princess. Grades: K-4.
Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

Changing Lifestyles (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) $129.95 per video

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Recommended because from busy, overcrowded cities to the bucolic remoteness of the countryside, the lives of average Japanese people vary greatly. Japan 2000 concludes with a look at these different lifestyles. A typical, expensive high-rise apartment is compared with projects designed to provide cheaper housing and relieve city overcrowding. A young family on a remote island discusses the advantages and disadvantages of their chosen lifestyle. A young woman compares her lifestyle with that of her more traditional parents. 2003; English. Color. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Chi-Hoon: A Korean Girl (1998)

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Recommended because this book records a week in the daily life of Chi-hoon, an eight-year-old girl who lives in Seoul. Korean culture and values are portrayed and the reader is given a look at what it means to grow up in a male dominated culture.
Reviewed by East Asian Library (University of Pittsburgh)

Citation: McMahon, Patricia., & O’Brien, Michael. Boyds Mills Press

Media Type: Book

Child Research Net

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Child Research Net is a non-profit organization with most of its funding coming from a large educational corporation in Japan called Benesse Corporation. Topics and materials included in this site are key issues about education in Japan, search engine, and related links. Start bySchools in Japan” in “Links” since it provides links to elementary, middle, and secondary schools around Japan. Be aware of the fact that ‘Teen’s Photo Project 2003‘ provides numerous pictures presenting Japanese teen-agers’ daily lives.

Children in China (1997)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because soft, inviting black and white photographs, featuring children in China conjure feelings of warmth and fascination. 90 stunning portraits allow us to witness China’s future whether at school or at play, in rural or urban areas, and alone or with family and friends. Also includes a brief overview of China’s history and touches upon children’s issues such as the one-child policy, respect for one’s elders, and the co-existence of new technology and formal education. ages 7 & up. 10.25″ x 8.25″. 116 pp.
Reviewed by Asia for Kids.

Citation: Karhausen, Michael. Orbis Books

Media Type: Book

Children of the Secret State: North Korea (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) VHS- $129.95; DVD- $139.95

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Recommended because this revealing documentary contains clandestine video footage shot at great personal risk by a North Korean known as Ahn Chol and by journalists posing as tourists. Through interviews with street children, refugees, and former prisoners, this program explores the plight of youth in the last remaining Stalinist dictatorship and perhaps the most secretive state on the planet. From Pyongyang, to the China/North Korea border, to South Korea, to the infamous prison camps, the cameras expose the truth behind the wall of secrecy that hides a record of 3 million reported starvation deaths in the last decade and hundreds of thousands of children with nowhere to call home. Some content may be objectionable. A Discovery Channel Production. (46 minutes, color)
This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

China Page Parable/Story

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is a treasure trove of parables/stories from classical Chinese literature. Included are Confucius, Mencius, LieZe, among others. There are stories suitable for all levels. Start by any parable or story that students are interested in or you want to introduce to your students. Be aware of the fact that this site also offers Chinese text version. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 4/17/02.

China through Mapping (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) $24.95

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because in this lesson, Mimi Norton integrates world geography with the study of Chinese culture and history by engaging her young students in a variety of activities to locate natural and human-made landmarks on maps of China. To build background for this lesson, she has had the students create salt-dough maps of China and label them with map symbols. Ms. Norton begins the lesson by reviewing map symbols with students and having them use the symbols to locate important natural and human-made land forms on desk maps. Then the class sings a song about the continents and oceans and locates them on a floor map. Ms. Norton explains that they will use what they are learning about scale in math class to enlarge a small map of China to room size. To do this, Ms. Norton first draws a large grid on the floor. Then she hands out cards, each representing a small section of China. Students then copy the information on their card to the corresponding square on the floor grid. The result is a large floor map of China. After the map has been drawn, students label the natural and human-made features at the correct locations on the map. Ms. Norton reads a story about a fictitious traveler in China and has students trace the traveler’s journey. As a culminating activity, students don a Chinese dragon costume and walk to famous locations on the map. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Chinese Portraits: Images Across the Ages (1993)

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Recommended because one of the first volume in a series, the collective biographies introduce famous men and women such as Confucius, poets Li Bo and Du Fu, Lin Xezu (who fought the opium traders) and the Soong family whose members played various political roles in t he twentieth century. Victoria Burck’s engaging ink-and-watercolor paintings and portraits appear throughout the book adding color and setting to the tone. Reviewed by East Asian Library (University of Pittsburgh)

Citation: Hoobler, Dorothy., & Hoobler, Thomas. Raintree Pub

Media Type: Book

Culture Kit: Japan (2000)

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Recommended because a quick overview of Japan’s land, celebrations, arts and crafts, and everyday life in an information-packed kit! Includes a huge poster, colorful map, projects, activities, recipes, crafts, and an audiotape with an interview with Japanese children, songs, a folktale, and a Japanese language lesson. 8.5″ x 11″. 64 pp. Ages 6-13. Be aware of the fact that “Culture Kit: China” is also available.
Reviewed by Asia for Kids.

Citation: Scher, Linda., & Oates, Mary. Scholastic; Bk&Cassett edition

Media Type: Book

Discover Korea : School and Community (1988) Grades: Elementary Education, Secondary Education

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Recommended because a series of three video packages prepared for use in elementary and junior high schools. This popular series introduces Korean life as seen through the eyes of Korean schoolchildren. Each 2Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute video centers on a theme introducing Korean culture and society from different perspectives. FAMILY AND HOME A visit with a Korean middle school student and his family. SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY A trip to a Korean school and an opportunity to join in community life. GEOGRAPHY AND INDUSTRY A guided tour of diverse regions of South Korea emphasizing geography’s impact on lifestyle. An easy-to-use teacher’s manual and a double-sided classroom poster accompany each video. Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Earth in Motion (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is an international project for participants to share and record everyday life and happenings with others around the world. Topics and materials included in this site are Children and Nature (Studies of the diversity and similarities of our natural world), Children and Culture (Studies of the diversity and similarities of our cultural world), digital picture books, country quizzes, discussion forum on use of technology in the classroom, other projects such as water project, food project, or Looking at my country project and more. I think that you can make your students choose a project or Start by “View All” since it provides all current contributions to Earth in Motion. I strongly recommend “Looking at my country” project since it presents countries through the eyes of children by providing pictures drawn by children from Japan, Denmark, Italy, Germany, and U.S.A. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Elementary School Visit

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Recommended because this site makes efforts to present a school life of Japanese elementary school students. Topics and materials included in this site are numerous photos of Japanese students of Hamamatsu City Higashi elementary school and brief description of the photos or relevant school events. This page will be good to learn what a school life of Japanese elementary school students is since the photos are presented in the same order that they experience at school. Start by “Slides Show of Schools” in “Education” since it presents slides to represent Japanese schools. Be aware of the fact that this site also includes information about Tokyo, Culture, Activities, Daily Life, Food, and Hamamatsu.

Families of the World: Families of China (1996) National Geographic Society, Educational Services

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because one good video aimed at the younger set is Families of China, part of the Families of the World series for ages Slavic and Eastern Europe-10. Families features two 1Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute programs narrated by children, one living in a rural village and the another in a moderately sized city. Each program details the families’ daily routines, carefully avoiding making any judgements about their lifestyle, and subtly emphasizing the similarities between Chinese and American children. Grades: K-4.
Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

Families of the World: Families of Japan (1996) National Geographic Society, Educational Services

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Recommended because unlike the other Families of the World videos shot in Asia, children watching Families of Japan will come not away from the video with the feeling that Asia is generally worse off than the United States. Both children portrayed in the two 1Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute segments, a farm boy and a city girl, have lives somewhat similar to their American peers. They go to well-funded schools, watch familiar American and Japanese television programs and prepare for a fun in-school event called Sports Day. The documentary does focus on some aspects of Japanese culture that are different, however, such as wearing separate indoor and outdoor shoes and planting sticky rice. This video provides a good introduction to modern Japanese life. Grades: K-4.
Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

Families of the World: Families of South Korea (2000) National Geographic Society, Educational Services

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Recommended because like the other videos in the Families of the World series, Families of South Korea is composed of two 1Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute segments, one detailing the family life of a rural child and the another the life of an urban child. This video is the most recent addition to the series and makes the most mention of political issues. Grades: K-4.
Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

Famous Japanese (Kansas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site presents a list of detailed information about Japanese famous figures. Topics and materials included in this site are information about Japanese famous people in modern-day Japan by dividing them in seven categories: musicians, politicians, sports figures, TV & movie personalities, cultural leaders, writers, and others. Start by searching for detailed information about particular famous Japanese that they are interested in or already know. This resource was originally recommended by the Center for East Asian Studies at University of Kansas.

Folktales from China (Pittsburgh)

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Recommended because it provides Chinese folktales and relevant links. Topics and materials included in this site are eight Chinese folktales and three links to other three Chinese stories. These folktales and stories will be suitable for higher elementary school students since most of them are long and complex. Be aware of the fact that this site is a part of “Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts,” collection of folktales around the world, by Dr. Ashliman of University of Pittsburgh, which helps students to learn similarities and differences among the folktales by comparing them. This resource was originally recommended by Asian Studies Program at University of Pittsburgh.

Getting into Chinese Thought: An Advanced Reader II (2002)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because these readers, organized around both elite and folk Chinese cultural themes such as China’s imperial system and Chinese religions and beliefs, are especially suited to students who are ready to read, write and analyze short texts in Chinese. The books enlarge the reader’s vocabulary (750 or more new words in each) through stress on cultural allusions, classical idiomatic expressions and analysis of word roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Exercises on remembering details, analyzing ideas, synonyms and discussion questions test reading comprehension. With English and pinyin in vocabulary lists only.

Citation: Wang, Hailong. Beiling University Press. $19.95

Media Type: Book

Houses of China (1996)

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Recommended because Shemie explores the lives of people through the homes they build and describes the beliefs that influence Chinese design: Fengshui and Confucianism.
Reviewed by East Asian Library (University of Pittsburgh)

Citation: Shemie, Bonnie. Tundra Books (NY)

Media Type: Book

Images of China: Journeys with the Ethnic Minority Groups of China

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site makes an effort to produce a photographic body of work of the various cultures that exist throughout this immensely diverse country, China. Topics and materials included in this site are photos of Xinjiang Province, the Tibetans, and more from China, and information about purchase original prints. Start by “More from China” since it provides photos of various minority Chinese women, which will help students to see China from different perspective (minority people’s views).

Internet Chinese Music Archive (Wisconsin)

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Recommended because this site provides large collection of audio files (in SUN Audio format) of many types of music in China. Categories include traditional, modern, popular, ceremonial, foreign, and Revolution-era Beijing Opera. Start by hearing historical speeches in Chinese by Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai, Deng Xiaoping, and Zhu De. Be aware of the fact that the site is located at the University of North Carolina. There is a new category of Children’s Songs. When you enter the site, click on “Mirror Sites” to get to links to other Chinese music web resources and FTP sites for users to download the audio files.
This resource was originally reviewed by Center for East Asian Studies at University of Wisconsin Madison.

Japan Thru Young Eyes (UCLA)

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Recommended because this site makes an effort to present Japan as it appears in the eyes of young people living in Japan today. Topics and materials included in this site are information on various topics including “Living Tradition,” “Superstition in Our Life,” food, One-Day Training at a tofu shop, Japanese ghost stories, and survival information. This page will be nice to show students what Japanese young people value and how. Start by any topic that students are interested in. But I think “Superstition in Our Life” will be interesting to elementary students since the superstitions are deeply embedded in Japanese people’s life and affect their beliefs and behaviors. Be aware of the fact that the information is gathered by students at Kanda University of International Studies and Bunkyo Women’s College. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at University of California Los Angeles.

Japanese Children’s Favorite Stories (1953)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because these Japanese traditional stories have captivated the hearts of generations of children. One of Japan’s most noted illustrators of children’s books, Yoshio Hayashi, adds authenticity to the already fascinating short stories in this collection. 8.5 x 8. 120 pp. Ages 6 & up.
Reviewed by Asia for Kids.

Citation: Sakade, Florence. Tuttle Publishing

Media Type: Book

Jing, A Chinese Girl (1990) Leslie Schwartz (VHS, 18 minutes, English)

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Recommended because this video features a typical Saturday and Sunday in the life of a fifth-grade student In Hangzhou, China. Viewers meet her family and friends, and follow her to school.
Recommended for its glimpse of everyday life for elementary/middle school.
Reviewed from East Asia Program Resource Lending Library online catalog.

Media Type: Media

Kids Peace Station Hiroshima (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site makes an effort to present a life of Sadako Sasaki who was a victim of the atomic bomb and provide a chance to talk about peace. Topics and materials included in this site are The Sadako Story 21, Sadako and the Atomic Bombing, Kids Peace Plaza (Discussion Forum), Kids News, and relevant links. Start by “The Sadako Story 21″ since this movie file provides students with an opportunity to learn about a life of one kid victim of the atomic bomb and what we can do. Be aware of Be aware that you need Flash Player (plug-in) in order to watch the movie files (A link to the website to download Flash Player is provided in this site.) This resource was originally recommended by East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Kids Web Japan (Indiana)

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Recommended because it provides a wide range of general information, plentiful pictures, and photos on Japan and Japanese culture, and contents for elementary students. It would be good for low elementary students. Topics and materials included in this site are cultural, historical, political, economical overviews of Japan, daily lives of Japanese school children, maps of Japan, and quizzes on Japan and Japanese culture. Start byExplore Japan” since this page presents basic information of various topics about Japan such as geography, weather, daily life, politics, culture, economy, history, and sports. Be aware of the selection of the topics and contents that elementary school children learning about Japan seem interested in and other languages are available to see this site. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Kids’ Park Japan (UCLA)

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Recommended because this site makes an effort to provide an opportunity to interact with Japanese kids through pen-pal project or chat, and information about Japanese elementary school. This site will be specifically good for elementary school students to find a chance to interact with Japanese elementary school students or find pen-pals in Japan. Topics and materials included in this site are chat rooms on general topics and specific interests such as Game, Anime, and Pet, pen-pal project, Rice project, and a link to the website on Oono Elementary School. Start by “Oono Elementary School” page since it provides general information about what the Japanese elementary school is like. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at University of California Los Angeles.

Kids’ Space (Indiana)

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Recommended because this site attempts to encourage students around the world to participate into some activities in this site. Topics and materials included in this site are regional maps with national flags, Kids’ Space Connection (Penpals), Kids’ Gallery, Story Book, Beanstalk, Songs, and Children’s Costumes. Start by “Folk Tales” in the “Story Book” since the page provides folk tales around the world, which are written by children. Be aware of the fact that you need QuickTime3.0 plug-in in order to listen to music or songs by children in the “On Air Concert” and this page offers a link to a website for a free QuickTime3.0 plug-in download. This resource was originally recommended by East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Kites: Magic Wishes That Fly Up to the Sky (2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book takes place in Ancient China. Its focus is on different kites and what flying a kite meant in this particular story. Each animal is symbolic, and the symbolism is well described. The ending has a wonderful step-by-step guide to making a kite. It shows an ancient form of government. Also in studying the cultural landscape of any state with a large Chinese population the importance of the Chinese in their history, this is a good book to use showing how Chinese traditions have changed or stayed the same among the Chinese that came to U.S. Adapted from a review by Z. Salameh, teacher participant in ORIAS Summer Institute, 2001 on International Children’s Literature. Recommended for Grades 1-5. ISBN# 0-37Slavic and Eastern Europe-81008-0 (picture book)

Citation: Demi. Random House

Media Type: Book

Korea Children’s Favorite Folktales (1986)

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Recommended because readers can Enjoy a glimpse of the fantasies that occupied the minds and hearts of Korean children during the years when Korea was known as the “Hermit Kingdom.” 3 modern short stories are also given to round out a complete circle of delectable folktales. 8.5″ x 11″. 70 pp. Ages 6 & up.
Reviewed by Asia for Kids.

Citation: Hyun, Peter. Tuttle/Seoul International

Media Type: Book

Korea Yesterday (Pennsylvania)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site makes efforts to present history of Korea with numerous pictures. Topics and materials included in this site are brief description and historical maps of Korean history divided into nine time periods: old Choson period, the three kingdoms, united Shilla & Parhae, Koryo period, Chosan / Yi period, Japanese dominion, Korea divided, the Korean war, and the cold war. Start by any period that students are interested in or you would like to teach. Although description of Korean history is not suitable for elementary school students, they will be able to understand how Korea was historically formed by showing a set of historical maps and with a teacher’s brief explanation about what happened in each time period. This resource was originally recommended by the Center for East Asian Studies at University of Pennsylvania.

Korean Folk Music (Audio Cassette/CD)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this collection of beautiful traditional Korean folk dance music transports the listener into the heart of Korea’s musical culture. Recorded with traditional instruments such as the Ka Ya Kum, A Jang, Piri, Puk, and Keo Mungo. Very easy to listen to, and enjoyable for children. 51 minutes. Side A 1. Traditional Music 2. Very Popular Dance Music (Kkok du gag si) 3. Flower Wreath Dance (Hwa Guan Mu) 4. Fan Dance (Bu chae Chuan) 5. 500 Years (Han oh baek nyua) Side B 1. Love Music (Sa Rang Ga) 2. Knife Music (Kum Ma) 3. Spontaneous Dance (Juk Hung Mu) 4. Monk Dance Music (Sung Mu) 5. Fairy Dance (Sunnyo Mu) 6. Sogo Drum Dance (Sogo Chum) Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

Korean Instrument

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site attempts to introduce Korean music instrument. Topics and materials included in this site are detailed information, pictures of and sounds of 56 Korean instruments. Start by showing pictures or listening to the sounds of Korean music instrument will be of great interest of elementary school students.

Minwa: Two Traditional Tales (1990) NHK/Japan, All Nippon Airways

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this program, produced by NHK/Japan, All Nippon Airways, and the Mid-Atlantic Region Japan-in-the-Schools Program (MARJIS), is intended to introduce K-6 students to Japanese folklore. In the video, puppets are used to tell two Japanese stories, “The Crane Who Returned the Favor” and “Princess Kaguya.” Minwa is part one of a three-part series of 30-minute videos, Japanese Culture: Old and New (described below). A teacher’s guide accompanies the guide.
Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

My Family from Japan (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) $19.95

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Recommended because this video allows viewers to meet Keisi, an 11-year-old boy living in Japan’s capital city of Tokyo with his parents and two older sisters. Working hard is a way of life for Keisi’s family. Like most Japanese children, Keisi has private school lessons after his regular school day, and returns home by 9:30 p.m. for dinner and homework before bedtime. Because his family is so busy, Keisi values their time together on the weekends. He especially enjoys playing ball with his father, going to the park with his sisters and occasional visits with his distant cousins. A Teacher’s Guide is included and available online. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

My Family from South Korea (2003)

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Recommended because Meet Eun-jai, the oldest daughter in her family from the capital city of Seoul, South Korea. Eun-jai lives in a high-rise apartment close to her school. After school, she helps her younger sister with homework, practices piano and shares a traditional Korean meal with her family. Join Eun-jai as she dons a traditional Korean costume to visit her grandparents and share exciting news — the passing of her piano exam! Witness Eun-jai’s strong family ties as her success is celebrated with games, photos and karaoke. A Teacher’s Guide is included and available online.
This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

National Palace Museum (Pittsburgh)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it presents the essence of Chinese art and crafts accumulated over a thousand years. Topics and materials included in this site are collection of Chinese art and crafts, information about National Palace Museum, Virtual Tours of the museum, Kid’s Corner, games, and downloadable Chinese paintings. Start by “Children’s Playground” in Kid’s Corner since it provides images of children’s play and toys, and their description. Be aware of the fact that Downloadable beautiful Chinese paintings for desktops, e-cards, calendars, and screensavers are available in this site. This resource was originally recommended by Asian Studies Program at University of Pittsburgh.

Odd Japanology (UCLA)

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Recommended because it provides interesting quizzes and a list of Japanese heroes and heroines. This site will be good for elementary school students to learn about Japan, especially for Japanese historical heroes and heroines. Topics and materials included in this site are three levels quizzes (level of fundamental, friend, and soul) and a list of Japanese heroes and heroines divided into various ways including specific eras, characters, and groups. Start by “Quizzes on Japan” (Level of fundamental) since it provides basic information about Japan. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at University of California Los Angeles.

QuickTime VR (Pittsburgh)

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Recommended because it provides QuickTime VR movies of buildings and nature scenes from Japan and China. Topics and materials included in this site are mainly movies on buildings in Japan, China, and France. Be aware of the fact that QuickTime is necessary to watch the movies provided in this site and a link to the website for free downloading QuickTime is available on this page. Also this page is a part of the site called “Electric Samurai” presenting slides and pictures on cobweb castle, cyber shrine, virtual China, virtual Mongol, and Oriental Museum. This resource was originally recommended by Asian Studies Program at University of Pittsburgh.

Rabbit in the Moon: Folktales from China and Japan (1995) China Project / Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this unit introduces students to China and Japan through a cross-cultural exploration of eight Chinese and Japanese folktales, illustrated by slides. Tales included are: The Rabbit in the Moon, How the World was Made, The Old Woman and the Tiger, The Monkey and the Pheasant, The Funny Little Woman, The Grateful Snake, The Boy who Drew Cats, and the Golden Axe.
Reviewed by the EAP Resource Lending Library online catalog at Cornell Library.

Media Type: Media

Red Scarf Girl:A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution (1998)

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Recommended because this book is about A first-person account of one girl’s experience during the Cultural Revolution. Written for children and young adults.
Reviewed from Indiana University East Asian Studies Center Selected Bibliography of Resources. Please check this URL — http://www.indiana.edu/~easc/respub.htm

Citation: Jiang, JiLi. HarperTrophy

Media Type: Book

Sadako (1993)

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Recommended because Sadako is a young girl dying of leukemia as a result of the bombing of Hiroshima 10 years earlier. Her hope, seen in her folding cranes (a symbol of long life), becomes the symbol of hope for peace. This is a classic work, very popular with American students. Recommended for Grades 3-6.
Reviewed by A. Petrakis, teacher participant in ORIAS Summer Institute, 2001, on International Children’s Literature. Please see this URL — http://ias.berkeley.edu/orias/summer2001/bibliographies.html.

Citation: Coerr, Eleanor. New York: Putnam ($6.99)

Media Type: Book

Salsa in Japan: A Japanese Latino Mix (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Sale: video $195, Rental: video $75

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Recommended because this remarkable documentary on multiculturalism explores the growing subculture of salsa dancing in Japan, where salsa dancing and salsa clubs serve as a source of interaction and cultural mingling between Japanese and Latino immigrants to Japan. Each group has a different way of dancing and different reasons for going to the dance clubs. In scenes at the clubs these differences are apparent. However, salsa clubs are also important and popular places for interaction between Japanese and Latinos, places where learning between the two groups and a greater cultural appreciation of one another can occur. The video examines two types of salsa clubs in Japan. One draws more Japanese and the other draws more Latinos. The key difference between the two is the purpose for going. In the clubs that draw more Japanese, there is a greater focus on dancing well — on looking good. Most of the clientele are students of salsa and some enter competitions. The clubs that draw a largely Latino crowd have more of a “party” atmosphere. Some of the clientele are great dancers, others not. Some even learn how to dance salsa in Japan, because it’s not in fact a universally “Latin” dance. The main attraction of these “parties” is the chance to get together with other Latinos, blow off steam, and have a good time. “Salsa in Japan” briefly recounts the history of salsa for those unfamiliar with the dance and examines the many connections between Latin America and Japan through interviews with people involved in the salsa world. This energetic, vibrant, and accessible video will reward viewing and stimulate discussion in any class dealing with issues of multiculturalism and immigration, and in a wide variety of courses in Japanese and Asian studies, Latin American studies, and cultural anthropology. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Stockton’s Japan Links (Ohio)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides a list of links on various topics about Japan. Topics and materials included in this site are a list of links on topics about Japan including government, business, news, traditional arts, language & ed., travel & regional, miscellaneous, major links, and live views. Start by “Live View” since it provides a list of links offering live camera views of various places in Japan, so the live camera views will help elementary school students to see real Japan. This resource was originally recommended by East Asian Studies Center at the Ohio State University.

The Future of the Countryside (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) $129.95 per video

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Japanese farmers face a variety of problems as they face an increasingly globalized economy. This program visits a family-run rice and vegetable farm, where members subsidize their income by working at a nearby factory sponsored by the government. A timber-yard manager discusses efforts under way to protect Japan’s forests. 2003; English. Color. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

The Internet Chinese Music Archive – Children’s Songs (UCLA)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site makes an effort to archive digitized Chinese music/songs and to provide such a place for sharing the common love of Chinese music. Topics and materials included in this site are 27 songs that Chinese children know. Be aware of the fact that if you would like to download songs provided in this site, in “Mirror Sites”, there are several links that you can get them through the FTP access of the archive. Also this site presents Chinese traditional music, modern music, popular music, ceremonial music, and music from other places. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at University of California Los Angeles.

The Japan Foundation Los Angeles

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because the Japan Foundation Los Angeles provides materials on teaching about Japan for grades K-5 and teaching Japanese language.

Citation: The Japan Foundation Los Angeles & Language Center

Website: http://www.jflalc.org/?act=tpt&id=383

Media Type: Book

The Japanese family: the lifestyle of the businessman. Produced by Shin-ei, Inc.; written and directed by Takakuwa Makoto

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Recommended because contemporary Japanese family life is presented here as seen through the stories of three Japanese families.
Reviewed by Future East Asian Library of University of Kansas http://lark.cc.ukans.edu/%7Eeastasia/mediajapan.html

Media Type: Media

The Korean Cinderella (1996)

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Recommended because this book is a wonderful story based on three variations of the Korean Cinderella. Pear Blossom, a stepchild mistreated by Omoni (her stepmother) is aided by magical animals to lessen her burdens at home and help her to become the wife of a noble man. 8″ x 10″. 48 pp. Ages 5 & up.
Reviewed by Asia for Kids.

Citation: Climo, Shirley. HarperTrophy

Media Type: Book

The Way We Do It in Japan (2002)

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Recommended because Gregory moved to Japan for his Dad’s job. On the first day of school, he’s embarrassed when he takes out his peanut butter sandwich and sees everyone else eating rice and soybeans. 8 x 10 32 pp ages Slavic and Eastern Europe-9 grades K-4
Reviewed by Asia for Kids.

Citation: Iijima, Geneva., & Billin-Frye, Paige. Albert Whitman & Company

Media Type: Book

The World of Kenji Miyazawa (Duke)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides literary works by Kenji Miyazawa who is one of Japan’s most read and best loved author. This site would be good for students at all levels to learn about Kenji Miyazawa’s works. Topics and materials included in this site are information about Kenji Miyazawa, his literary works, gallery, forum, the local climate and his work, his essays, English translation of his works, his downloadable translated works, and related links. Be aware of the fact that there are five downloadable translated stories in this site. This resource was originally recommended by the Asian/Pacific Studies Institute at Duke University.

Yeh-Shen: a Cinderella story from China (1982)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because held forth by many as the oldest known version of Cinderella, this story dates back to 9 BC China. Beautifully illustrated by Ed YOung, the theme of the fish/fairy godmother character plays through the book. Excellent for comparative literature along with Shirley Climo’s Egyptian, Persian, and Korean Cinderella stories, among others.
Reviewed by A. Petrakis, teacher participant in the ORIAS Summer Institute, 2001, on International Children’s Literature. Suitable for all ages. Please check this URL — http://ias.berkeley.edu/orias/summer2001/bibliographies.html.

Citation: Louie, Ai-Ling. New York: Philomel Books ($6.99)

Media Type: Book

Yoshiko and the Foreigner (1996)

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Recommended because this picture book illustrates the way of building friendship of people holding different cultures. Yoshiko met Flem, an American military officer, on the train in Japan, established love and tolerance beyond their cultural differences, and finally married on March 16, 1960. This book clearly describes prejudices of foreigners that Japanese people used to have and how both of them faced and overcame the prejudices. This book would be good for higher elementary or middle school students.

Citation: Otey-Little, Mimi. Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)

Media Type: Book

Yoshiko and the Foreigner.

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this picture book illustrates the way of building friendship of people holding different cultures. Yoshiko met Flem, an American military officer, on the train in Japan, established love and tolerance beyond their cultural differences, and finally married on March 16, 1960. This book clearly describes prejudices of foreigners that Japanese people used to have and how both of them faced and overcame the prejudices. This book would be good for higher elementary or middle school students.
Reviewed by Masataka Kasai, 5/1/02.

Citation: Little, O. M. (1996). New York: Frances Foster Books Farrar Straus Giroux. ($16.00).

Media Type: Book