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(Haiti) UNHCR (UN High Commission for Refugees) (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because the UNHCR site details the situation of refugees around the globe. News releases are listed by date, and include political updates, and the relations of Haiti with their Latin American and Caribbean neighbors. Start by looking at the lead stories on the page and then typing Haiti in the search feature in the upper right. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 2/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003.

Annual Editions: Global Issues 09/10. (2009).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because new editions each year contain collections of 30-40 up to date articles from scholars and the world press that examine the most important global issues facing the planet.  The book has a world map, a glossary, a topic guide, and a list of related websites. This is one of many Annual Editions series. Others (see list on the Annual Editions website) are also relevant to specific issues as well as regional studies.

Citation: Jackson, Robert M. (editor). Guilford, CT: McGraw-Hill/Dushkin. http://www.dushkin.com

Media Type: Book

Antiracist.com

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is online learning resource center of the Canadian Anti-racism Education and Research Society (CAERS). The site links to an electronic library. Start by selecting the Youth Action link. Be aware of the search box so you can target your query. Reviewed by Tim Dove Aug 2004.

Artcyclopedia (Women)

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Recommended because it is a search engine for the arts, featuring Frida Kahlo. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. NCSS.

Border Eco Web (Environment)

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Recommended because the Border Eco Web page is designed to facilitate public access to environmental information for the U.S.-Mexican border region. It has loads of information, some of probably too technical for younger students, on the ecological problems spanning the border. This site is for high school students who are motivated to read the information in governmental reports. Many reports are in Spanish/English. What made the site more accessible was its organization by environmental issue (listed below): air water solid and hazardous waste pollution prevention natural resources GIS/spatial data projects legislation/policy/regulations socioeconomic data environmental health environmental education environmental justice watershed management grants sustainable development contingency planning and emergency response cooperative enforcement and compliance. Be aware of the “Directory”. It can help you with contacts for your students. This site is also available in Spanish. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 2/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. San Diego State University.

Breaking Through (2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this 195 page book is about a fourteen-year-old Francisco Jimenez and his family who leave Mexico and arrive at the U.S. and Mexican border in Nogales, Arizona. In the months and years that follow, Francisco, his mother and father, and his seven brothers and sisters not only struggle to keep their family together, but also face crushing poverty, long hours of labor, and blatant prejudice. Reviewed by Tim Dove Jan. 2003.

Citation: Jim Houghton Mifflin Company ($15.00)ISBN/ISSN: 0618011730

Media Type: Book

Capital Sins (1993, 60 minutes) (Economics & Development).

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Recommended because this is Americas series — Part II. It looks at the impact of economic development on ordinary people in the Americas. Set in Brazil, it examines the stubborn hold of poverty and economic stagnation in the region and their human and environmental costs. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

Center for International Policy (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is the most comprehensive source of information on US aid to Colombia and the Colombian peace process. This site also questions US foreign Policy with Cuba. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Seminar at NCSS Convention.

Chicano! History of the Mexican-American Civil Rights Movement (1996) (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this four-part series (60 minutes) covers the United Farm Workers Union and Cesar Chavez. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

Costa Rica: The Land and its People (1998, 25 minutes) (Environment)

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Recommended because it provides wide-ranging view of the Costa Rican people, their origins, customs, and aspirations. The film is an open window on the immeasurable biological richness, the culture, the government, and the political and social life in the only country in the world that has no army. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

Deadly Embrace: Nicaragua, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund. (1996).

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Recommended because deadly embrace of the video’s title refers to the post-Sandinista government’s acceptance of the structural adjustment policies of the World Bank and IMF, which have devastated Nicaragua’s economy at least from the standpoint of the vast majority of the people. According to the video, unemployment has rocketed to 60%, credit to small farmers has been slashed, public school teachers work in deteriorating conditions for $60 to $70 a month, and public programs of all kinds have been eliminated. Meanwhile, free trade zones welcome transnational corporations who pay pennies an hour to desperate workers.
Review from Rethinking Schools/Rethinking Globalization Resources Page, 07/2002.

Media Type: Media

Economic Commission of the United Nations for Latin America (Economics & Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is a great site for the student interested in Latin American economic development. It was founded for the purposes of contributing to the economic development of Latin America, coordinating actions directed towards this end, and reinforcing economic relationships among the countries and with the other nations of the world. The promotion of the region’s social development was later included among its primary objectives. This site is also useful for its links to additional United Nations and Latin American regional trade associations sites. Topics include (see under “analysis and research) the social aspect of development (including population, labor, poverty, equity and the distribution of income, education and training health, housing, social security, NGO’s and civil society, and gender) and several “more technical” economic subjects such as macroeconomics. Be aware of the fact that the information is accessible in both English and Spanish. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 1/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. LANIC.

El dia de tu me quieras (The day that you love me) (1999) (Women)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because directed by Florence Jaugey Produced by Camila Films, Central Cultural Managua, the everyday life of policemen and social workers in one of the Women and Children Agencies of Managua reveals the authentic and complicated face of domestic violence. The video camera follows the women around the police station as they file complaints. There is no narrator. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/1/02. Not from a Title VI site. Be aware of the fact that it is in Spanish with English subtitles. Be aware that this video is rather sophisticated, and that students should have knowledge of women’s issues in a third world country in order to fully engage in the information.

Media Type: Media

El Otro Francisco (1974) (Human Rights)

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Recommended because directed by Sergio Giral (100 minutes, Feature), this film is based on the 19th century novel Francisco by Anselmo Su

Media Type: Media

Electronic Outreach re Africa, Latin America and the Middle East

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Many U.S. Title VI Centers for International and Area Studies are developing electronic databases for teachers. Scroll down this page to find several exciting new resources on Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Elvia: The Fight for Land and Liberty (1988, 27 minutes) (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it tells the dramatic story of the landless poor in Honduras through the life of a brave 49-year old grandmother and peasant organizer. The impact of U.S. military intervention on the peasants is also explored in this revealing documentary. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

Environmental History of Latin America (Environment)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site supplies an extensive bibliography of environmental resources for Latin America. The Online Bibliography for Environmental History of Latin America has now over 400 references, thanks to the invaluable suggestions of colleagues all over the field. They are constantly checking references and updating the bibliography in order to best serve educators. Regional information includes the Amazon, Andes, Brazil, Caribbean, Southern Cone, and Mesoamerica. It also list an extensive bibliography for online resources and videos on environmental topics. Be aware of the fact that this site is only a bibliography: it does not contain reviews nor lesson plans. However, if students are interested in researching Latin American environmental concerns, this is the site to reference. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 2/2002;updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. LANIC

Esperanza Rising (2000)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this 262 page book was a Pura Belpr

Citation: Ryan, Pam Munoz. New York : Scholastic Press ($4.99 )ISBN/ISSN: 043912042X

Media Type: Book

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Exploring International Connections Through Service Learning (Economics & Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this lesson provides ideas for service learning projects that explore the community’s cultural relationships with other parts of the world. The goal of service learning is to enhance student learning by providing opportunities to put the skills and knowledge emphasized in the classroom into action in the community. The lesson, which could be carried out over several class periods, is intended to be flexible and might be used for any subject or topic or for any grade level. While this lesson focuses on Indiana, the content could easily be transferred to other states. Be aware of the fact that this is a printable PDF document. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

Farming Around the World (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because this lesson explores the resources that are available to farmers around the world. Students will contrast farms from different regions of the world. They will use these descriptions to identify productive resources used in agricultural production and draw conclusions about the relationship of resource abundance to goods and services produced. This lesson is especially appropriate for middle school to help students learn about resources. While this lesson focuses on Indiana, the content could easily be transferred to other states. Be aware of the fact that this is a printable PDF document. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

Favelas (Economics & Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it takes viewers into the heart of the Brazilian favelas, the slums that spread uncontrollably through Sao Paulo, Brazil’s wealthiest industrial center. The social reality of this cruel habitat is examined by those who dwell there and by artists, philosophers, educators and sociologists. Directed by Chico Teixeira,1989, color, 50 mins., video Portuguese dialog with English subtitles. LANIC*** “… portrays the sadness and hopelessness of life in the favelas … could be used as a starting point for discussions on social responsibility and the economic problems of the disadvantaged.” — Video Rating Guide for Libraries “…sensitive … highly recommended.” (Library Journal)

Media Type: Media

Flowers for Guadalupe (1995) (Women)

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Recommended because this film explores the importance of the Virgin of Guadalupe as a liberating symbol for Mexican women today. Twenty- three women speak out, in traditional testimonial format. The documentary follow an all-women’s pilgrimage from Queretaro state through several arduous but joyful days as it weaves its way through difficult terrain, harsh weather and congested streets to the Virgin’s shrine in Mexico City. Be aware of the fact that it is in Spanish with English subtitles. Be aware that this video is rather sophisticated, and that students should have knowledge of women’s issues in a third world country in order to fully engage in the information. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/1/02. Not from a Title VI site.

Media Type: Media

Foreign Agricultural Service Online: North American Free Trade Agreement (Economics & Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this informative fact sheet details NAFTA from the perspective of the United States Department of Agriculture. Specific information includes: benefits to U.S. Agriculture, the elimination of specific NAFTA trade barriers, protection for import-sensitive crops, key NAFTA provisions, and rules of origin for agriculture. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 2/2002.

Global Economy: The Hometown Effect (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because this lesson examines the impact of globalization on a community. Students use primary sources to identify positive and negative effects of a multinational company’s move from Bloomington, Indiana, to Juarez, Mexico. In an additional activity, students explore the effects when an international company moves into an Indiana community. Be aware of the fact that this lesson is most appropriate for the high school level. While this lesson focuses on Indiana, the content could easily be transferred to other states. This is a printable PDF document. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

Gloria Estefan (1995) (Women)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it describes the success story of the talented Cuban singer and songwriter. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002. NCSS web page.

Citation: Gonzales, D. Springfield, NJ: Enslow Publishers.

Media Type: Book

Greenpeace International

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its resources and work on environmental issues such as climate change, forests, oceans, nuclear energy, toxic wastes, trade and environment, and the effects of conflict.  Start by examining What we do and Multimedia  to get a sense of its resources through links to topics and to videos, webcams of Greenpeace ships and photo essays. Be aware  that Greenpeace is an advocacy organization with specific goals. Some visuals may not be appropriate for younger students. Reviewed by Merry Merryfield 1/3/12.

H-net (Women)

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Recommended because H-Women is an international electronic discussion group that has been set up at Michigan State University to provide a forum for college and university historians to discuss women’s history. Subscription is free and subscribers automatically receive messages in their computer mailboxes. The primary purpose of H-Women is to enable historians more easily to discuss research interests, teaching methods and the state of historiography. Start by entering the country of interest or topic in the search bar, in order to access sites and articles regarding Latin American women. Be aware of the fact that H-Women is especially interested in methods of teaching history to graduate and undergraduate students in diverse settings, so it is written at a higher reading level. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 2/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. LANIC

Hell to Pay (1988) (Economics & Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of being a straight forward documentary on women’s economic issues in Bolivia. Hell to Pay is a moving and politically sophisticated analysis of the international debt-situation through the eyes of the women of Bolivia, one of the poorest countries of Latin America. Although most affected by government austerity programs, peasant women are assumed not to understand the workings of international capital and foreign policy. Hell to Pay poignantly contradicts such assumptions as teachers, textile workers and miners’ wives speak vividly and with great comprehension of the causes of the debt-crisis and the burden they are forced to bear. Be aware of the fact this video is “sophisticated,” and that students should have knowledge about the International Monetary Fund’s policies. Availability: the video is available for check out through the Lord Hall Resource Center on the OSU campus. It is can also be purchased for $295.00 through the Latin American, Spanish, and Portuguese Collections at the OSU Library. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 1/30/2002.

Media Type: Media

Help Wanted (Economics & Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this lesson focuses on labor as an important human resource and points out that members of the labor force often migrate. Students are encouraged to examine the reasons that people seek employment outside of their own communities and even in other countries. They are also asked to consider the reasons employers may look for workers from other places. Class discussion may include many factors, such as cost of living, overall living conditions, and language barriers of new residents in the United States. This lesson should be taught in conjunction with “Coming to Indiana,” which examines the importance of immigration throughout Indiana’s history. Be aware of the fact that this lesson focuses on Indiana, the content could easily be transferred to other states. This is a printable PDF document. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

Human Rights Watch (Human Rights)

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Recommended because Human Rights Watch is dedicated to protecting the human rights of people around the world. They investigate and expose human rights violations and hold abusers accountable, challenge governments and those who hold power to end abusive practices and respect international human rights law, and enlist the public and the international community to support the cause of human rights for all. Search by country or by topic. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 2/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. LANIC

In Women’s Hands (1993, 60 minutes) (Women)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it examines the remarkable changes made by women of the Americas in the last quarter century, as they organized to create better living conditions for themselves and their families. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

Indiana From the Air/Indiana?s Resources, Goods, and Services (Economics & Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this unit introduces students to concepts that will help them understand why Indiana (or your state) has a stake in the world economy. Students will also identify the resources found and products produced in their own community. Finally, students will examine why not only goods and services cross borders, but also productive resources, including the people who produce goods and services. Be aware of the fact that this lesson focuses on Indiana, however the content could easily be transferred to other states. This is a pintable PDF document. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

Indiana in Motion: You Can Get There From Here (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because this lesson explores Indiana’s (or your state’s) physical connections to the world through transportation systems, including road, rail, air, and water. As a result, students would hypothesize about ways that Indiana’s transportation infrastructure brings Indiana closer to other parts of the world and other parts of the world closer to Indiana. What I found compelling was the idea for the assessment, asking students to develop an export plan for a local or nearby product. On a world map they would trace the paths and describe the modes of transportation they would use to move that product to Indiana’s major export destinations, including Canada, Japan, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Germany. This lesson is especially appropriate for middle school to help students learn about geography. Be aware of the fact that this lesson focuses on Indiana, the content could easily be transferred to other states. This is a printable Word document. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

Inter-American Development Bank (Economics & Development) (Women)

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Recommended because this site has access to information and policies that reflect women’s unique medical needs could make the difference. Referred by Cathy Rakowski. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003.

Interdependence/Geography at the Mall (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because this unit demonstrates how local businesses depend on other regions of the United States and the world for resources and markets. Students will collect data about businesses in their own community and produce a display that highlights these connections. They will identify products they consume that are produced in other countries. They will also learn about the infrastructure that helps move these goods and services between a community and the rest of the world. Be aware of the fact that this lesson focuses on Indiana, the content could easily be transferred to other states. This is a printable Word document. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

International Organization for Migration

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Recommended because the site encompasses a variety of migration management activities throughout the world. Topics about migration include assisted returns, counter-trafficking, labour migration, migration health, movements, mass information, and technical cooperation on migration, migration policy and research programme, working group on gender issues, individual portraits, and links to relevant program and project web sites. Start with Media to see photo essays an videos of stories of people and places.  Reviewed by Merry Merryfield 1/3/12.

Las Mujeres (Women)

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Recommended because it provides information on a feature of Latin American women, featuring many talented musicians and artists. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. NCSS.

Latin American Working Group (Human Rights)

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Recommended because this site contains updates on legislation, action alerts, and links to the 66 organizations in the coalition. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Seminar at NCSS Convention.

Learning to Divide the World: Education at Empire’s End. (1998).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it examines the historical and educational legacy of imperialism/colonialism. The author explores how the enduring geographic, racial, and cultural categories created by European colonialists continue to ‘divide the world’ into black and white, east and west, and primitive and civilized.

Citation: Willinsky, John. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Media Type: Book

Life and Debt. (2001).

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Recommended because this may be the best video overview of the effects of globalization on one society in this instance, Jamaica. Life and Debt focuses on the role of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Jamaica, but it’s much more than that. It weaves together interviews with the IMF deputy director, farmers, workers, scholars, a former Prime Minister (Michael Manley); a narration based on Jamaica Kincaids A Small Place (see p. 54); Jamaican music; life in a tourist hotel; and a kind of Greek chorus of Rastafarian men who comment on Jamaica’s neocolonial plight. The conclusion: Jamaican society has been devastated by high interest payments on its external debt (52% of the entire national budget), cheap imports (potatoes, peanuts, carrots, milk powder, chicken), the WTO ruling forcing Jamaica’s bananas into direct competition with much cheaper bananas from Central and South America, and exploitative practices in Jamaica’s World Bank pushed free zone. (Of course, there are some economic winners: Because of high crime, one security firm featured has gone from 120 guards employed to between 1800 and 1900 guards and over 300 dogs.) It’s this relatively comprehensive video walk through Jamaica’s economy that can help students see the relationship between farm conditions and sweatshops, and provides a partial answer to the sweatshop defense: Well, no one is forcing people to go to work in these places.
Review from Rethinking Schools/Rethinking Globalization Resources Page, 07/2002.

Media Type: Media

Maria’s Story (1990) (Women)

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Recommended because Maria’s Story is an intimate portrait of a thirty- nine-year old mother of three who is a leader in the guerrilla movement in El Salvador. Short and stocky, with ready wit and common sense, Maria Serrano is a down-to-earth woman whose passion for social justice dominates her life. Maria represents a growing number of Latin American women on the forefront of social change. The filmmakers spent seven weeks in Maria’s temporary camp, under mortar fire and helicopter surveillance, to capture the story of the human side of this war. Be aware of the fact that this video is subtitled in English, is rather sophisticated, and that students should have knowledge of women’s issues in a third world country in order to fully engage in the information. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/1/02.

Media Type: Media

Measure (Women)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is a USAID site, concerned with “collecting and using data for informed decisions in population, health, and nutrition.” They have several ongoing projects regarding women’s and children’s health and nutrition in developing areas. You need to select findings, then by region, then Latin America. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 2/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. LANIC

NAFTA Secretariat (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because the NAFTA Secretariat is the dispute settlement body for NAFTA. The site contains the extensive and detailed trade agreement (describing the trade agreement’s conclusions on clothing to cars to telecommunications), and the steps required to resolve a trade dispute. It also contains contact information in Canada, the United States, and Mexico, and each country’s reports on the status of NAFTA. While this site is technical, come students may find its economic and diplomatic information interesting. Be aware of the fact that it is accessible in English, Spanish, or French on this opening page. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 2/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003.

National Museum of Women in the Arts (Women)

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Recommended because it features on Frida Kahlo. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. NCSS.

Notable Hispanic American Women (1993) (Women)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it contains short biographies of famous Hispanic American women. Recommended for grades 9-12. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002. Global Education Resources, Indiana University

Citation: Telgen, Diane (Editor). Detroit: Gale Press.

Media Type: Book

Population Reference Bureau

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended as a leader in providing timely and objective information on population trends (see Datafinder) and their implications as the world population exceeds 7 billion. Sections include focus areas, topics, and regions, datafinder, quickfacts, and PRB library. There are specific pages for educators and journalists,  Start with Datafinder for graphics and stats and Educators which provides lesson plans, resource guides, US in the world, etc. QuickFacts is also recommended since it provides information by topics related to population issues such as education, gender, population trends.  Reviewed by Merry Merryfield 1/3/12

 

Rainforest Action Network

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Recommended because it provides information on corporate relationships with the rainforest, human rights of those impacted by the rain forest, benefits and disadvantages of energy use regarding the environment, and resources for teachers and students. Start with Get Involved, and Resources sections.  Also see Rainforest Heroes section for primary student resources. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

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Relief Web (Human Rights)

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Recommended because published by the United Nations, Department of Humanitarian Affairs, this very well-informed website provides excellent information (situation reports, press releases, maps, etc.) regarding crises throughout the world. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Global Education Resources, Indiana University.

Rigoberta Menchu: Broken Silence (1994) (Economics & Development) (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this video is recommended for students who are deeply interested in the living conditions of women in Latin America. This tape features interviews with Rigoberta Mench

Media Type: Media

Road of No Return: The Banishment of Maria de las Mercedes Barbudo (1997) (Women)

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Recommended because directed by Sonia Fritz (color), this short drama portrays the efforts of a young woman photographer to uncover the fragmentary and little-known history of an early nineteenth-century Puerto Rican feminist and political activist who was deported for her nationalist beliefs by the Spanish colonial government of the era. As the historical drama unfolds-and is revealed to involve repression on the grounds of both gender and political beliefs-it is juxtaposed to events in more recent Puerto Rican history. LANIC.

Media Type: Media

Romero (1989) (Human Rights)

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Recommended because this is a MUST SEE for students studying Latin America. It is a compelling and deeply moving look at the life of Archbishop Oscar Romero of El Salvador (played by Raul Julia), who made the ultimate sacrifice in a passionate stand against the injustice and oppression in his country. Ultimately he is assassinted in 1980 at the hands of the military junta. Film guide are available for this film through the Kansas Title VI site. Film guides include background information about the social, cultural, and political environment necessary to understand the film. Also included are sample lesson plans which can assist in classroom use of the video in both language and social science classes. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/1/02. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

Sacred Earth (1996, color, 54 minutes) (Human Rights)

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Recommended because directed by Mary Ellen Davis, the film reveals the plight of landless peasants in Guatemala, where property ownership is restricted to a small percentage of the nation’s wealthiest citizens. Most peasants, including the indigenous Indian peoples, own no land, and are brutally exploited by agricultural developers. During the last few decades, the Guatemalan army has massacred thousands of peasants, forcing thousands of others to become refugees. While protesting these injustices and human rights violations, Guatemala’s dispossessed peoples are also shown continuing to celebrate life through their music, dance and religious ceremonies. LANIC.

Media Type: Media

School of Assassins (18 minutes) (Human Rights) (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because narrated by Susan Sarandon, this film is a 1995 Academy Award Nominee. Do you know that the US taxpayers foot the bill for a school on US soil which has graduated some of the worst human rights violators in the hemisphere? Since it was established in 1946, the US Army School of the Americas has trained thousands of Latin American soldiers. Using rarely seen footage, the program shows how officers who studied at the school are responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of people. This award-winning video has sold over 10.000 copies. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

School of the Americas: An Insider Speaks Out (1998, 16 minutes) (Human Rights) (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because narrated by Major Joseph Blair, US Army, this film is a production of Veterans for Peace. For the first time, an insider speaks about the School of the Americas. A twenty-year veteran with two tours of duty in Vietnam believes that the SOA should be “torn down like the Berlin Wall.” Blair states that the SOA no longer serves democratic ends and is a training ground for oppression. “We routinely had students who were known human rights abusers, and it didn’t make a difference to us,” recounts Major Blair in this compelling video. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

Stolen Dreams: Portraits of Working Children. (1998).

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Recommended because it documents the lives of working children in India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Mexico, and the United States. The book explores (1) why children work, (2) where children work, and (3) what can be done about the problems and issues associated with child labor. Here’s a quote from Doi, a 13 year old factory worker in Bangkok, Thailand: “My father died and my mother just didn’t have enough money to feed all my brothers and sisters, so that’s why I came to work. What I really miss is games. We don’t have any time to play football or anything like that. I don’t understand why we can’t have some time in the evening to play. I suppose it’s because there’s so much work to do.”

Citation: Parker, David L. with Engfer, Lee, & Conrow, Robert. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications.

Media Type: Book

Sweating for a T-Shirt (1999).

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Recommended because it is about a college student’s travels to Honduras to find out about the conditions of the workers who make the t-shirts and sweatshirts worn by students. The video provides a first-hand account of the living and working conditions of works in sweatshops. Available from the Resource Center of the Americas ($25.00). http://www.americas.org.

Media Type: Media

Target Nicaragua: Inside a Covert War (1983) (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because directed by Saul Landau (color, 60 minutes), this video portrays the CIA’s Contra war against Nicaragua’s Sandinista government. LANIC.

Media Type: Media

Teaching for Change-NECA (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because NECA began as the “Network of Educators on Central America.” The scope of NECA’s work has expanded, therefore the name was changed to Network of Educators on the Americas, but the acronym NECA was maintained. They generate teaching materials regarding equity and social justice issues. You can browse their catalog on line and order publications to share with your students. For instance, “Caribbean Connections” is a five-volume series written for secondary-level and college students with titles on Haiti, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Regional History and Moving North; and “Beyond Heroes and Holidays” is a practical guide to K-12 multicultural, anti-racist education and staff development, providing examples of how educators, staff, students, and parents can work together to transform the curriculum. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 2/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. LANIC.

The Charcoal People (1999, color, 68 minutes) (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because directed by Nigel Noble, this film by Academy Award-winning filmmaker Nigel Noble documents the workaday lives of Brazilian peasants who cut down trees in the Amazon rain forest and burn the wood in earthen kilns to make charcoal, an essential ingredient for the manufacture of pig iron in the U.S. These “charcoal people,” including children as young as five, live and work in appalling conditions in a toxic environment with no sanitation or potable drinking water. The film graphically details the primitive process of making charcoal, by burning wood in clay ovens, which has not changed since the early nineteenth century. The workers are systematically subjugated by debt, since they are charged more for their food than they receive in wages. The laborers and their families discuss the backbreaking and dangerous work, which involves the despoliation of their natural surroundings, and we witness the toll it takes on their own health and the global environment.

Media Type: Media

The Chinampas (1990, 31 minutes) (Environment)

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Recommended because this multi-disciplinary documentary examines an ecologically sustainable system of agriculture that has flourished in Mexico for some 2,000 years. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

The Courageous Women of Colombia (24 minutes) (Women)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, May 18, 2004

Recommended because the war on drugs in Colombia is a war against the poor. In this video, testimony from women in Colombia provides a rarely seen perspective on the drug war. Follow an international delegation to Bogot

Media Type: Media

The Debt Crisis: An Unnatural Disaster. (1990).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this video is a primer on the history and social consequences of the Third World debt crisis and structural adjustment programs, especially focusing on the Caribbean. It has something of a homemade feel to it and lacks the polish that students are used to, but it is a clear and hard-hitting overview of the severe difficulties the debt crisis creates in poor countries. One of the videos strengths is that it is entirely narrated, and the skits acted, by Caribbean people themselves. The Debt Crisis covers much the same ground as Banking on Life and Debt, although its Caribbean focus is narrower. However, the playfulness (some might argue, silliness) of its skits and its concentration on a smaller geographic area probably make this more accessible for many students.

Media Type: Media

The Devil’s Dream (1992, color, 58 minutes) (Human Rights)

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Recommended because directed by Mary-Ellen Davis, it portrays the appalling socio-political realities of contemporary Guatemala, where the majority of the population — malnourished and illiterate — are exploited by wealthy landowners and businessmen and brutally repressed by the military. The film shows the plight of peasants who work as migrant agricultural laborers for starvation wages and who are often `disappeared’ or murdered by the military to prevent any political protest or organization. Interwoven throughout the film, and providing ironic comment on this social reality, is a performance of the traditional `Dance of the 24 Devils,’ derived from Spanish medieval religious drama, in which each devil represents a social evil and Death heralds the end of mankind. LANIC

Media Type: Media

The Gringo in Mananaland (1995, 61 minutes) (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because constructed almost entirely from film clips – cartoons, newsreels, educational films, home movies and features – it documents the representation of Latin America in U.S. films. Since the turn of the century, popular media in the United States have promoted a stereotyped image of Latin America in order to justify the concept of U.S. dominance in the hemisphere. The “neighbors to the South” depicted here are a fantasy of course, featuring such staple creations as the Latin lover, highway bandits, ignorant peasants and banana republics. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

The Human Race: Escaping from History (1994, 53 minutes) (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because this documentary looks at the effects of industrialization on Mexico and the impact of its development on the rest of the world. There is a special emphasis on Mexico City, the most polluted and fastest growing city in the world. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

The US in Latin America: Yankee Go Home (50 minutes) (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because this insightful A&E program focuses on those activities and their lasting effects on the region. when the Cold War split the world into differing political spheres, the Soviets and the Americans competed to spread their own ideologies. Latin America became a focus of this struggle, as the two powers sent spies and soldiers to engage in clandestine operations. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

The World in Your Community (Economics & Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because to introduce students to the ways that they are linked to the world and of the richness of their own community’s past, the unit begins with one of the basic necessities of daily life, food. Students have the opportunity to examine how the types of food we eat have become more international over time as a result of specialization, interdependence, and globalization. In subsequent lessons, students explore their community’s ethnic and cultural history and present circumstances. Related activities show how students can make a difference in their own community through service learning projects with an international focus. Be aware of the fact that while this lesson focuses on Indiana, the content could easily be transferred to other states. This is a printable Word document. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

The World in Your Hometown (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because this is an extensive lesson or series of lessons intended to engage students in a research project that explores their community’s international connections in both the past and the present. It might be used as part of a United States history course, as a community studies project, or in conjunction with a service-learning initiative. After researching several of these topics, students pool their information to develop a community profile or web, which shows how their community is linked to the world. Be aware of the fact that the lesson takes from 1-3 weeks. While this lesson focuses on Indiana, the content could easily be transferred to other states. This is a printable Word document. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

Transitions/What Business Should I Open? (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because these lessons focus on the impact of international trade in a variety of areas. Lesson I looks at local examples of international trade. Lesson 2 looks at the impact on the environment. Lesson 3 is a case study of Thompson Consumer Electronics and its decision to move operations from Bloomington, Indiana, to Juarez, Mexico. This lesson is designed so that teachers can easily adapt it to explore the effects of transitions in their own or nearby communities. Lesson 4 examines skills students will need to be successful in a global economy. By the end of this unit students should be able to compare and contrast how education and technology influence productivity and economic development, explain the role of government in the allocation of resources in a market economy, explain the importance of labor productivity to individuals, firms, and nations by explaining how labor productivity affects income, production costs, and national standards of living, and explain why nations trade goods and services and explain the impact of trade on the economies of the nations involved. Be aware of the fact that while these lessons focus on Indiana, the content could easily be transferred to other states. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

Unfinished Business (1991, 59 minutes) (Economics & Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because the Buried Mirror series – Part V. Spain, Latin America and the Hispanic communities in the United States have all undergone enormous changes in this century. Within the lifetime of those born now, half the population of the U.S. will be Spanish-speaking. Every year, half a million brave the border patrols to enter the U.S. illegally. “They are looking for the Gringo gold, but also bringing the Latino gold,” Carlos Fuentes observes. Hispanic immigrants contribute a wealth of traditions: diverse cultural creativity in art, music and dance, and respect for family ties — distinct hallmarks of the Spanish-speaking world. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

UNICEF The State of the World’s Children

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its many resources on the world’s children, their issues and lives.  See reports on the state of the world’s children along with many other publications, information by country, and other topics.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

UNICEF (Human Rights)

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Recommended because its task is to help children living in poverty in developing countries. If you access the English homepage, you can search for articles on topics relating to children in the country of interest. Be aware of the fact that many Latin American countries have their own UNICEF web page in Spanish. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 2/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. LANIC

Voices From the Fields (1997) (Economics & Development)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because directed by Ulla Nilsen and Selene Jaramillo (in color, 45 minutes), this video follows farm workers from California’s Salinas Valley back to their roots in the fields of rural Mexico, where they recount their everyday struggle to cope in the midst of the globalization of agriculture and the impact of NAFTA. Despite health hazards, environmental degradation and the risks of migration, they have managed to provide for their families and to conserve their traditional practices and values. LANIC.

Media Type: Media

Washington Office on Latin America (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site contains coverage of legislative issues relating to all of Latin America, including military, police training, and human rights. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. Seminar at NCSS Convention.

Welcome to the World of Frida Kahlo (Women)

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Recommended because it features on Frida Kahlo. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. NCSS.

What’s the Connection? (Economics & Development)

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Recommended because this lesson shows students how even small Indiana (or your state’s) communities specialize in the production of goods to sell to people in other countries. Students contact businesses and determine what specialization occurs in their own community. As a result of this lesson students will be able to identify goods and services produced in the community, use verbal and written communication skills to communicate with local businesses and report on results, use map skills to locate import and export countries, and demonstrate an understanding of the impact of international trade on their community. This lesson is useful at the middle school level. Be aware of the fact that while this lesson focuses on Indiana, the content could easily be transferred to other states. This is a printable Word document. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/2002. Indiana in the World/The World in Indiana.

Where Are the Beans? (1994).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Where Are the Beans? is a kind of detective story and an excellent classroom resource. Linda Shelly, of the Mennonite Central Committee, lived in La Esperanza, Honduras for several years. While there, she loved to eat red beans, a staple of the Honduran diet. But when she returned in 1993, she found that no one ate beans any longer. Where are the beans? is the question that Shelly pursues as she visits old friends to learn about how their lives have changed. Shelly discovers the answer in the structural adjustment policies that the International Monetary Fund pressed the Honduran government to adopt: fewer subsidies to the poor, currency devaluation, no more government loans to small farmers, and increased exports of … you guessed it: red beans. The small Honduran farmers have been pulled into the global economy pulled in at the bottom, says Shelly. Their new position in this system demands more and more from them and offers them less and less. Review from Rethinking Schools/Rethinking Globalization Resources Page, 07/2002.

Media Type: Media

Women and Work in Latin America (1991) (Women)

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Recommended because directed by Doranne Jacobson and produced by The Upper Midwest, the information in this film covers marianismo and machismo in Nicaragua, and is not particularly insightful or exciting for students at the junior high or high school level. It was filmed during the 1980s Anti-Somoza movement. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 3/1/02.

Media Type: Media

You Think!

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a very easy-to-navigate educational tool developed for teachers and student research on environmental, financial, social, political and cultural issues across the world.  There is information on MDGs, AIDS, climate change, corruption, education, energy, food & agriculture, gender, health, information & communications, international trade, natural resources, population, poverty, private sector development, sustainable development, urbanization, water & sanitation, and more. Start by checking out Issues, Multimedia and For Teachers.  Reviewed by Merry Merryfield 1/3/12.

Zapatista (1998, 54 minutes) (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this film is about January 1, 1994: A few minutes after midnight in Southeastern Mexico and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has just become law. During the night, a small band of Indian rebels rises up in the state of Chiapas demanding local autonomy. The call themselves the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN). Summer 1996: Three students from the United States and Europe hear something so new and powerful in the Zapatistas’ message that they realize they must go to Chiapas. Armed only with credit cards and two state-of-the-art digital video cameras they make their way deep into the Lacandon jungle to join and document the ongoing rebellion. Combining the raw intensity of footage from the front lines with a hip digital aesthetic, Zapatista is the definitive look at the uprising in Chiapas. It is the story of how a few thousand Mayan peasants have transformed the political culture of Mexico forever. Kansas.

Media Type: Media

Zapatistan Index (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is constructed by the revolutionary Irish-Mexico Group to detail the events of the Zapatista people in the Chiapas region of Mexico. The struggle of the indigenous and oppressed people of Mexico has never ceased since the Europeans invaded their land; and this site details the history, economics, politics, and human rights issues that the indigenous people in the Chiapas region have faced. Be aware of the fact that this is a left-leaning, revolutionary site, and that more right-leaning, conservative viewers may find the site’s information contradictory to their interpretation of Mexico’s history, economic development, politics, and plight of the indigenous peoples. Monthly web reports on the Chiapas region are available for subscribers. Reviewed by Stace Rierson, 1/2002; updated by Tim Dove Sep 2003. LANIC