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21st Century Debates: Food Supply.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this children’s guide – one of an excellent series of 21st Century Debates – is aimed at 11 to 16-year-old schoolchildren. Making the point that we live in a world of food mountains and famines, where some people suffer from obesity while millions of others die of hunger, it examines the trends and issues behind such inequalities. It also considers possible solutions – from the development of agricultural technology to changes in global trading and food distribution systems. Can we produce enough food to nourish an ever-increasing population? Can we feed everyone without harming the environment? And will we ever see an end to hunger? These are just some of the questions tackled in this excellent and colorful book. Available from www.amazon.com.

Citation: Bowden, R. Hodder & Stoughton Childrens Division. (2003)

Media Type: Book

A Life Like Mine

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, March 3, 2010

A Life Like Mine tells the story of how children live around the world through four themes:  survival, development, protection, participation.  Excellent images and text suitable for upper elementary and middle school students. Truly has a global perspective. Includes many visuals and maps.

Is is published by UNICEF.

Media Type: Book

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A Quiet Violence: View from a Bangladesh Village.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because the authors of the book provide their first-hand experience of living in Bangladesh village, depict the people lives, and their struggles of survival from hunger and poverty. In this book, two Bengali-speaking Americans take the reader to a Bangladesh village where they lived for nine months. There, the reader meets some of the world’s poorest people–peasants, sharecroppers, and landless laborers–and some of the not-so-poor people who profit from their misery. The villagers’ poverty is not fortuitous, a result of divine dispensation or individual failings of character. Rather, it is the outcome of a long history of exploitation, culminating in a social order which today benefits a few at the expense of many.
Reviewed by www.foodfirst.org.

Citation: Hartmann, B. & Boyce, J. (1995). Food First Books.

Media Type: Book

Agri-Culture: Reconnecting People, Land and Nature.

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Recommended because Agri-Culture envisages the expansion of a new form of food production and consumption founded on more ecological principles and in harmony with the cultures, knowledge and collective capacities of the producers themselves. It draws on many stories of successful agricultural transformation in developing and industrialized countries, but with a warning that true prosperity will depend on the radical reform of the institutions and policies that control global food futures, and fundamental changes in the way we think. The time has come for the next agricultural revolution.
Reviewed by www.peopleandplanet.net

Citation: Pretty, J. (2002). Earthscan Publications.

Media Type: Book

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Annual Editions: Global Issues 09/10. (2009).

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Recommended because new editions each year contain collections of 30-40 up to date articles from scholars and the world press that examine the most important global issues facing the planet.  The book has a world map, a glossary, a topic guide, and a list of related websites. This is one of many Annual Editions series. Others (see list on the Annual Editions website) are also relevant to specific issues as well as regional studies.

Citation: Jackson, Robert M. (editor). Guilford, CT: McGraw-Hill/Dushkin. http://www.dushkin.com

Media Type: Book

Banking on Life and Debt. (1995).

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Recommended because The video is an overview of World Bank and International Monetary Fund policies that promote poverty, starvation, and ecological ruin. Measured by its ability to engage most high school students, Banking on Life and Debt is spread too thin, covers too much history and too much political economy, and is narrated by too many talking heads. Nonetheless, through examining World Bank and IMF policies in Ghana, Brazil, and the Philippines, the video offers a convincing portrait of an international economic order that drains resources from poor countries in the name of development. And if used with other readings and activities that explore the global debt crisis, this can be an important resource. The video doesn’t bubble over with hope, but we do meet activists in every country visited who describe efforts to organize for alternatives to debt slavery. Review from Rethinking Schools/Rethinking Globalization Resources Page, 07/2002.

Media Type: Media

Child of the Dark: The Diary of Carolina Maria de Jesus.

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Recommended because it is derived from the raw, primitive journal of a homeless mother of three struggling to survive in a squalid Brazilian garbage dump. The dairy of Carolina Maria de Jesus described the daily routine life in a favela- a human garbage dump, house of the poor, the hungry, and the desperate. The author illustrated the way daily life threatened these poor favelados. The hunger that invaded every shack, particularly hers, drove her to hunt for paper and metal in order to acquire just enough money to keep her and her children alive. The black population in Brazil was treated as none human beings. They were discriminated against by most of the white majority population. It clearly reflects the title of the book “Child of the dark.”

Citation: Jesus, G. M. D., translated by Clair, S. D. (1962). New York : New American Library. $6.95.

Media Type: Book

Deadly Embrace: Nicaragua, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund. (1996).

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Recommended because deadly embrace of the video’s title refers to the post-Sandinista government’s acceptance of the structural adjustment policies of the World Bank and IMF, which have devastated Nicaragua’s economy at least from the standpoint of the vast majority of the people. According to the video, unemployment has rocketed to 60%, credit to small farmers has been slashed, public school teachers work in deteriorating conditions for $60 to $70 a month, and public programs of all kinds have been eliminated. Meanwhile, free trade zones welcome transnational corporations who pay pennies an hour to desperate workers.
Review from Rethinking Schools/Rethinking Globalization Resources Page, 07/2002.

Media Type: Media

Earth Pulse

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 6, 2012

Recommended because this National Geographic site provides an immense amount of information regarding relationships of human population to world issues.  Especially useful for teaching geography (human, land, movement) and global issues.  Start with The Human Condition, then explore the menu bar on the left.  For primary students, click on the For Kids link.  Reviewed by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Famine Early Warning System Network

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is an excellent site covering famine/food issues around the world including African, Central American, Central & Middle Eastern countries and Haiti.  It maintains current situations of food supplies and factors affecting those supplies in these regions.  Categories of interest include: Agro-Climatic Monitoring, Markets & Trade, Livelihoods, Weather Hazards, etc.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Feeding Minds, Fighting Hunger

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Recommended because it is an international classroom for exploring the problems of hunger, malnutrition and food insecurity. Lesson plans and materials included in this site are provided for each of three school levels: primary, intermediate, and secondary. The lessons have been directed towards the middle of the developmental skills range for each level. Please be sure to click on titles of each lesson for more detailed explanations. In addition to lessons of teaching hunger, this site also includes links of sites of global education and world hunger. Start with the Youth Window for resources on Hunger. Be aware of the fact that this site contains an interactive forum for exchanging ideas. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

FIAN

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Recommended because FIAN is an international advocacy group for people and regions experiencing inadequate food supplies.  For more than 20 years, FIAN has been drawing attention to situations of hunger, and searching for solutions.  On this website, Start with Programs, and then explore Resources for publications and photos. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Finding Solution to Hunger: Kids Can Make a Difference.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it emphasizes that individual and collective actions can make a difference. There are 25 lessons included in this book, and they provide valuable background information and creative suggestions to help students find answers to the challenging questions: “What is hunger?” “Why are people hungry?” and “What can we do to help end hunger?” Lessons use journals, newspapers, readings (included), role plays, and simulations to delve into topics including famine vs. chronic hunger, the legacy of colonialism, and “Hunger USA.” Sidebars throughout the book help students move beyond negative feelings into constructive activism. Appendixes list fund-raising ideas, organizations to contact, and an annotated bibliography of books and videos. This book is suitable for students from Grades 4-12. Available from www.socialstudies.com.

Citation: Kempf, S. (2001). World Hunger Year. $23.

Media Type: Book

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (Minnesota)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because FAO is committed to ensuring people around the world have access to high-quality food.  This site contains excellent resources, news coverage, statistics for, and information about food and agriculture issues around the world.  Start with the Media Centre for multimedia resources.  This site is appropriate for secondary students. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Globalization 101

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this web site is extremely useful to secondary teachers and students who are studying globalization and global issues. Links which are provided are helpful to students and teachers and extend their research with extensive compilations of governmental and non governmental sources. Start by clicking on Teaching Tools. The user of this web site will find a number of lesson plans dealing with issues such as trade, technology, investment, health, culture, environment, migration, and IMF/World Bank. Reviewed by Ron Reichel. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Go M.A.D! – 365 ways to Save the Planet

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Go MAD! is full of fascinating facts, thought-provoking statistics and 365 practical tips to help you make a difference. Go Make A Difference! Recommended for K-12 students. If you care about the environment and aren’t sure how to make a positive difference, look no further. Reviewed by environ – for people, the environment and the future.

Citation: The Ecologist.

Media Type: Book

Hunger in the World

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Hunger in the World is a lesson plan organized by the Utah Education Network which contains activities (including role-playing and group activities), information, , games, references, and handouts for teaching about hunger in the world.  While this lesson plan is ideal for secondary students, it can be easily adapted for elementary students.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Hunger Notes

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Recommended because Hunger Notes highlights hunger issues around the globe.  The information on this site contains current statistics, activist opportunities, and multimedia.  Start with the Global link for World Hunger Facts, Additional Web Links, and World Child Hunger Facts.  Be aware there are images on this website which would be inappropriate for elementary and secondary students.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Hungry for Profit. (1984). Richter, R.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this documentary, filmed in 8 countries, shows how agribusiness has created large, mechanized plantations out of small, peasant farms which grow profitable export crops despite local food needs. Tells how this situation actually increases the amount of hunger for some residents of Third World countries. Reviewed by The Media Resources Center of the UC Berkeley Library.

Media Type: Media

Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this web site deals primarily with global agriculture equity issues, but has expanded its efforts into the sustainability and ecosystem fields. Start with Issues to locate  a selection of articles and documents about Global Issues- to include Agriculture, Climate Change, Energy, Environment, Food, Globalization, Health, Justice, Markets, and Rural Development .  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

International Forum on Globalization (IFG)

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Recommended because because although the IFG presents a slightly slanted focus in favor eliminating capitolist ideals which promote globalization, it does contain information pertaining to environmental activism around the world.  Start with Climate Resources and IFG Programs. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Isle of Flowers. Furtado, J. (1990).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this award-winning film depicts the human disaster of poverty brilliantly. From Brazil, this is a hilarious but ultimately devastating film about values, the food chain, and the human condition on a real life Brazilian island where pigs eat first, and the people are fed what the pigs leave over. Reviewed by First Run/Icarus Films.

Media Type: Media

KIDS ENDING HUNGER: What Can We Do? A Get-Into Action Book for Kids and Their Parents and Teachers.

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Recommended because as this appealing book on a grim subject (co-written by mom Tracy with her pre-teen daughter, Sage, at Sage’s instigation) uses stories, drawings, maps, and straightforward narrative to inform, inspire, and move young readers away from guilt and indifference toward positive ways to attack a very serious problem, 40,000 children die each day from hunger worldwide. Giving 50 practical ways to fight hunger, the book includes lists of resources and audiovisual materials, a bibliography, and a glossary. This book is suitable for students from Grades 4-9. Reviewed from Center for World Education, University of Vermont.

Citation: Howard, T. A. & Howard, S. A. (1992). Andrews and McMeel Publishing. $2.25.

Media Type: Book

Oxfam America ACT FAST

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Oxfam America ACT FAST contains information about food issues around the world, but primarily focuses on opportunities to raise awareness about hunger and women’s issues.  Their signature event, the Hunger Banquet, assigns attendees roles of people living in poverty in various places in the world. Fact sheets, multimedia, and information can be found on this website for use in teaching about food issues. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

PBS Online Forum: North Korea Famine

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Recommended because this online forum collects some key questions and news segments about hunger problem in North Korea, and this is a useful site for people who are interested in knowing hunger problem in North Korea. Topics and materials included in this site are questions posted by about North Korea famine such as degrees of widespread of famine, causes of hunger, and food estimates in North Korea as well as how other countries can help relieve the problems. Be aware of the fact that this information is from 1997, but can be useful in teaching about hunger and poverty in a region of the world not always focused on.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Sowing Seeds of Hunger. Heer, J. (2003).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because as it shows, in the village of northern Zambia, the fallout from this pandemic extends beyond agriculture, undermining development in the region while endangering the lives of orphans and widows affected by the rampant spread of HIV. In southern Africa, the highest rates of HIV infection occur among young adults, whose ages range from 15 to 49. This is the same group who, as agricultural workers and small scale farmers, are the backbone and future of countries such as Zambia. Since 1985, more than seven million farmers have succumbed to AIDS, striking at the heart of agricultural production. This film is suitable for students from Grade 7- 12.

Media Type: Media

The Atlas of Food.

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Recommended because this atlas, with vivid maps and graphics, provides a comprehensive account of the food chain – from plough to plate – and reveals how it affects the lives of us all. Food is vital for our health and welfare, and its production critically affects the environment as well as the wealth of nations. Despite a rapid increase in trade, hundreds of millions of people remain hungry, while chronic obesity is increasing worldwide. Much of the grain that could amply feed the worlds population is fed instead to cattle to satisfy the rich worlds appetite for meat. New technologies, such as GM crops, promise to increase food production, but are they completely safe? How do markets work, and whose vested interests are at stake? What are the impacts of different forms of farming, processing, transportation, retailing and changing eating habits?
Reviewed by www.peopleandplanet.net

Citation: Millstone, E. & Lang, T. Earthscan. (2003). New York : Penguin. $23.95.

Media Type: Book

The Business of Hunger. (1984). Maryknoll.

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Recommended because as this 28-minute video is about the exporting of cash crops is a major cause of hunger in some places. Many people go hungry while their governments continue to export vital foodstuffs, such as Soya beans and groundnuts to the industrialized countries. The film, a winner of American Film Festival, describes this reality in Asia, Africa and Latin and North America and proposes a more just distribution of the earth’s resources.

Media Type: Media

The Global Banquet: By Invitation Only. (2001). Maryknoll.

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Recommended because it is a two-part discussion of corporate farming and its global effects. Part 1 examines how corporate globalization of food threatens the livelihoods of small farmers in the U.S. and developing countries and how free trade is the route to mounting hunger worldwide, despite an overabundance of food. Part 2 looks at mass produced, low-cost food imports to developing countries and cash crop exports that deplete natural resources and render developing countries unable to feed themselves. It also examines the work of activists who are striving to rewrite unjust free trade policies. Reviewed by The Media Resources Center of the UC Berkeley Library.

Media Type: Media

The Globalization Website

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because because it provides links to a large amount of globalization resources. The site links to organizations, books, people, issues, theories, and a glossary. The site also links to other megasites, data sources, non-English sites (German, French, and Spanish). Start with General Links. and Data Sources (which are categorized by country or issue).  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

The Paradox of Plenty: Hunger in a Bountiful World.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is an outstanding compilation of excerpts from twenty-seven of Food First’s best writings designed to provide food system activists and the non-specialist general reader with an integrated overview of the world food system, how global politics affect hungry people, and the impact of the free market on the growth, processing, and distribution of foodstuffs. Through its research, Food First has shown that there is more than enough food for every man, woman, and child on the planet, but all too often the poor do not have access to that food. Rviewed by www.foodfirst.org

Citation: Boucher, D. M. (1999). Food First Books.

Media Type: Book

The world food problem.

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Recommended because this book discusses the growth of both food output and arable land in general and in the context of the specific conditions (population pressure, economic conditions, etc.) in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. It also provides a short history of world hunger and chapters on population, poverty, and the contributions of trade and food aid round out this valuable resource. Although the authors well-researched analysis of the world food problem does not offer any easy solutions to the problems of hunger. What he does, very effectively, is to show what has happened in the past 30 years and to infer what lessons might be learned that could be of help in the future. Reviewed by Library Journal.

Citation: Grigg, D. (1993). Blackwell Publishers. $29.95.

Media Type: Book

Waiting. Harvey, M. (1996).

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Recommended because it a powerful and moving documentary that challenges us to examine how we respond to countries in crisis. As a result of civil war that has engulfed the Sudan since 1956, the Dinka people in the southern part of the country experience famine and the threat of attack on an all-too-frequent basis. Waiting chronicles the remarkable dignity of a people in a truly desperate situation. The people of the town of Alek have run out of food. The grain crop has been consumed, and enemies have stolen their livestock. Desperate, the people appeal for hunger relief. One-hundred-and-forty-five tons of grains are air-dropped into Alek, but there is a problem: without enough relief workers to distribute the food properly, there might be a riot. For a week, as the food sits on the ground, everyone — the starving Dinkas and the well-fed aid workers — waits for relief. Reviewed by First Run / Icarus Films.

Media Type: Media

Where Are the Beans? (1994).

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Recommended because Where Are the Beans? is a kind of detective story and an excellent classroom resource. Linda Shelly, of the Mennonite Central Committee, lived in La Esperanza, Honduras for several years. While there, she loved to eat red beans, a staple of the Honduran diet. But when she returned in 1993, she found that no one ate beans any longer. Where are the beans? is the question that Shelly pursues as she visits old friends to learn about how their lives have changed. Shelly discovers the answer in the structural adjustment policies that the International Monetary Fund pressed the Honduran government to adopt: fewer subsidies to the poor, currency devaluation, no more government loans to small farmers, and increased exports of … you guessed it: red beans. The small Honduran farmers have been pulled into the global economy pulled in at the bottom, says Shelly. Their new position in this system demands more and more from them and offers them less and less. Review from Rethinking Schools/Rethinking Globalization Resources Page, 07/2002.

Media Type: Media

Who’s Hungry? And How Do We Know? Food Shortage, Poverty, and Deprivation.

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Recommended because it refines popular thinking about the underlying causes of hunger by looking at the complex relationships between hunger at different levels of social organization, from the state to the individual family, and how it is measured according to a “hunger typology” developed by Brown University’s World Hunger Program. This book is written by a sociologist, a nutritional anthropologist, and a demographer. Order from: United Nations Publications, 2 United Nations Plaza DC2-853, New York, NY 10017, USA. Telephone: (212) 963-8302 or 1-800-253-9646, fax: 1-212-963-3489, e-mail: publications@un.org.
Reviewed by www.worldhunger.org

Citation: DeRose, L., Messer, E., & Millman, S. (1998). United Nations University Press. $19.95.

Media Type: Book

Why Hunger

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Why Hunger is a non-profit organization and a leader in the fight against hunger and poverty in the United States and around the world. Start with the Food Security Learning Center for information, categorized by theme or issue.  Be aware that this website focuses primarily on the United States, and is funded by U.S. grants.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

WOMEN IN THE STRUGGLE AGAINST POVERTY: A CASE STUDY. (1995).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it uses narration and interviews to examine the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, which offers loans to poor village women for private and community enterprises, thus helping them avoid local money lenders. This film provides interviews the founder of the bank, Muhammad Yunus, and women who have been successfully involved with the bank. Discusses class and family dynamics related to economic independence, and highlights some of the obstacles the women have faced, particularly from fundamentalist Muslim leaders in the villages. It also includes interviews with husbands who have helped and encouraged their wives in using these resources. Reviewed by Media Resources of Indiana University.

Media Type: Media

World Food Programme

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is an excellent source of information about food, hunger, poverty, and related issues in the world.  Start by searching information based on Country, Programs, or Information About Hunger.  The World Food Programme is a United Nations initiative.  This site is appropriate for secondary students.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

World Hunger: Twelve Myths.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a revised edition of the classic on world hunger, three experts on food and agriculture expose the myths that prevent us from effectively addressing the problem. Drawing on Food First’s extensive research, the authors examine head-on the policies and politics that have kept hungry people from feeding themselves around the world, in both Third and First World countries, as well as the misconceptions that have obscured our own national, social, and humanitarian interests. World Hunger: Twelve Myths shakes many tenaciously held beliefs, but most important, it convinces readers that by standing together with the hungry we can advance not only humanitarian interests, but our own well-being. Reviewed by www.foodfirst.org

Citation: Lapp Grove Press Books. $10.40.

Media Type: Book

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World Population

Posted by: globaledadmin on Saturday, February 4, 2012

Recommended because this video highlights global population growth in the last 2000 years, demonstrating the strain on the environment and food production. Presented in a chronological timeline, it is also accompanied by visual representations of historical events.  This is an excellent video to be used with middle school and high school students for understanding the relationships between population, environment, and food sources.  Reviewed by Sara Adducchio 2012.

World Resources Institute

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because WRI is an environmental think tank that provides information, ideas, and solutions to global environmental problems. Start with Global Topics to find resources on agriculture and food, biodiversity and protected areas, business and economics, climate change and energy, etc.  Resources include news, brochures, maps, regional information, and current research.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

You Think!

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Recommended because it is a very easy-to-navigate educational tool developed for teachers and student research on environmental, financial, social, political and cultural issues across the world.  There is information on MDGs, AIDS, climate change, corruption, education, energy, food & agriculture, gender, health, information & communications, international trade, natural resources, population, poverty, private sector development, sustainable development, urbanization, water & sanitation, and more. Start by checking out Issues, Multimedia and For Teachers.  Reviewed by Merry Merryfield 1/3/12.