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A 16th Century Mosque

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on the Middle East in the 16th century. Topics and materials: Attractively illustrated book that examines the Suleiymaniye mosque in Istanbul, focusing on its cultural, religious and social significance. The book includes good introductions to Islam, the Ottoman Empire, and the culture and technology of the sixteenth century. Recommended for elementary and middle school students. Available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware of the fact that you will need to follow the Outreach link to the Print Materials link to access information. Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Fiona Macdonald and Mark Bergin

Media Type: Book

A Century of Islam in America(1987)

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Recommended because The Middle East Institute Islamic Affairs Programs. Occasional Paper No. 4.

Citation: Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck. Washington DC:

Media Type: Book

A History of Russian Literature (1994)

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Recommended because Recommended as a standard reference work written by a leading scholar. The book is a survey of Russian literature from its beginnings in the eleventh century to modern times. The author places the development of Russian literature in the context of Russian social and political developments and religious and philosophic thought. The literature covered includes early folklore, the medieval literatures, the dissident and emigre writing after the revolution, and the realist fiction of Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy, to the dissident literary movement that followed Stalin`s death. Availability; apparently out of print. Reviewed by Bill Wolf, May 2002; updated August 2003.

Citation: Victor Terras, Yale University Press

Media Type: Book

A Medieval Banquet in the Alhambra Palace (1991)

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Recommended because of its teacher resources on the Muslim Era. Topics and materials: A packet compiling both teacher’s resources, handouts and slides detailing the Alhambra, the Muslim-era fortress in Granada, Spain, as a centerpiece for discussing Islamic culture and presence in Spain from the 700s AD to 1492. Recommended for middle and high school students. It is available to be purchased at http://www.awaironline.org/. There is information at AWAIR on a teacher workshop to enable you to learn more about the simulation part of this workbook. Also available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Audrey Shabbas. AWAIR. 180 pages.

Media Type: Book

Akhet Egyptology (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it offers interactive access to Egyptian history. Topics and materials include Akhenaten & Amarna, Tutankhamun, mummy masks, art of the afterlife, grave goods, tombs & temples, sculpture, mythology, clickable mummy, the king list, Scottish Egyptology, museums & collections, Akhet bookshop. Start by using the Clickable Mummy link. Click on different parts of the mummy to learn about mummification.

Akhet-Aten Home Page (Texas)

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Recommended because it is a good resource for Egyptian history, Amarna period. Re-creation link. Topics and materials include introduction, Akhenaten, Nefertiti, Aten, Akhetaten, art, literature, digging, glossary, new & cool, bookshop, discussion, events, postcards, web links, references, for students, for teachers, re-creation, and FAQ. This site also has updates on current events around the country related to Egypt. Start by visiting for students , for teachers , and re-creation links. Be aware of the fact that this site was last updated in 2000.

Algeria: Women at War (1992, 52 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on Women during the sturggle for Algerian independence. Topics and materials: This video deals with two distinct periods of national history for Algerian women: the empowering war for independence and everything after, which has meant a struggle to regain personal independence in the face of attempts to isolate and limit women’s lives. Through a series of compelling interviews interspersed with wartime footage, Algerian women recount their experiences on the front lines of the eight-year struggle against France ending with independence in 1962. Educated, illiterate, urban, and rural women discuss their roles in commando units, providing refuge and aid, and taking over men’s jobs in their absence. The remainder of the video moves through the 1980s and up to 1992, when the multi-party system that opened political participation for women has failed, the FIS is taking violent action against “disobedient” women, and President Boudiaf, who supported women’s rights, has just been murdered. A penetrating look at the relationship between women’s and the country’s recent history. [AGF] Produced by Parminder Vir. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

Ancient Egyptian Culture Exhibit (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its Egyptian History, interactive Ancient Egyptian Concentration Game. Topics and materials include daily life, art, military, architecture, hieroglyphs, religion, maps, history, and archeology. Nice site for teachers and students. Start by clicking on Daily Life which includes information about the Nile, Geography and Agriculture, Religion, Kinship and Marriage, Medicine, Hieroglyphics, Astronomy, Egyptian Astrology, Games, Hairstyles, Beauty Aids, Papyrus Paper Making,Sanitation and much more.

Ancient Israel & Canaan (Penn)

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Recommended because of its information on Ancient Israel & Canaan. This site was created for educational purposes and includes activities for school-age children. Topics and materials land-time, daily-life, economy,and religion. On any of these pages you can find to links to a glossary, bibliography, and suggested activities created for kids 8-12 years old. Land -Time includes a map, climate, chronology, excavations, and archaeology. Daily-Life includes bread, weaving, animals, storage, personal identity, writing, and warfare. The Economy link includes labor & crafts, trade, and Phoenicians. Religion includes religion of The Bronze Age, The Iron Age, and death. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/14/02.

Ancient Persia

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Recommended because of its overview of Ancient Persia. Topics and materials include a simple overview of Ancient Persia. Be aware of the fact that the menu bar can be followed to an e-museum sponsoring several regions and times of the world, however, I was unable to locate more about Persia. There is good information at this link on other regions, though. This resource originally recommended by the University of Texas.

Arab Gateway (Arabic)

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Recommended because it is an introductory site for Arabic literature, poetry and folk literature. Strengths of this site: The poetry section has translated poems from the original Arabic with descriptions and brief analyses. Start by reviewing the language link in order to better understand the structure of ancient Arabic poetry and prose. Be aware of the chronology. The pre-Islamic era means before 622.

Arab Social Science Roundtable

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Recommended because of its vast web resources and information on 22 Arab nations.  Start by searching links to individual nations in left menu bar.  Navigating these links will present research centers, information centers, think tanks, and other entities providing peer-reviewed research about the Arab world.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Arab World and Islamic Resources

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Recommended because this is an excellent resource specifically for teachers and educators who want to use authentic Arab literary sources in the classroom. The books from this site are all found in libraries across the United States. This site is strongly recommended for all classrooms. Students are encouraged to begin with the literary page and read the reviews for more information. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols 05/2002.

Arab World Project of the National Inst. for Technology and Liberal Education

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Recommended because of the quality and thoroughness of the information and because of the excellent organization of information into small chunks. Start by reading the History section. The bibliographies, and readings for each section (not just history) are excellent. Be aware of copyright issues regarding the reproduction of materials for classroom use.

Arab World Studies Notebook (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its extensive resources and information on Muslims and the Arab World. Topics and materials include Introduction, Islam, Q’uran, Ramadan, Hajj, Muslims World wide, Jerusalem, Arab Christians, Women, Education, Family, Food, Language, Literature, Folktales, Music, Art & Architecture, Archaeology, Contributions, Al-Andalus, Colonial Legacy, The U.S. and Arab World, Oil, Gulf War, Question of Palestine, Arabs in America, and Country Profiles. Available for purchase through AWAIR at http://www.telegraphave.com/gui/awairproductinfo.html. Also available for loan to central Ohio teachers at OSU Middle Eastern Studies Center. The University of Texas also loans out the Notebook. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware of the outdated material and references in the book.

Citation: Audrey Shabbas. AWAIR: Arab World and Islamic Resources and School Services and Middle East Policy Council. 513 pages. $49.95.

Media Type: Book

Are You Listening? Voices from the Middle East: Different Voices, Different Lives (1998)

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Recommended because it is Cambridge, MA: The Teaching Resource Center, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University. 176 pages. $15.00. (OSU) Recommended for its teacher’s guide to addressing a variety of stereotypes through stories and situations. Topics and materials include Introduction, Family Matters, Women’s Voices, Outsiders, Twists & Turns, Varieties of Love, Student Activities, Background Notes, and Glossary. Available for purchase through the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard. Send a check to — Teaching Resource Center, Center for Middle Eastern Studies 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138. This guide is also on loan to central Ohio teachers through the OSU Middle East Studies Center. (See the OSU listing under Overview-Centers for more information.)

Citation: Carol Johnson Shedd

Media Type: Book

Articles on Ancient Persia

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its web resources on Ancient Persia. Several topics are listed under the headings of Topography, Royal Persons, Other Persons, and Other. From the top of this page you can also go to other pages on the same website. These would include Anatolia, Egypt, Judaea, Mesopotamia, and more.

Arts of the Abbasid Period, 750-1258 A.D. (Columbia)

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Recommended because of its online museum of art from the Abbasid period, as well as from other periods and regions of the Middle East. Topics and materials include online museum of art, map and a brief history of the region with links to further information. I recommend clicking on the Related Timeline Content menu bar (in the upper right hand corner) in order to get to other sites within the museum including Anatolia, Arabian Peninsula, Egyt, Iran, Iraq, Calligraphy, and a lot more. Use the Timeline Site Map link to access a timeline to see art from different periods.

Asian History on File (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because for Students, teachers, scholars, and general readers, this wide-ranging resource provides over 1000 reproducible maps, charts, timelines, and drawings. Asian History and culture from ancient times to the present are covered in five main sections: Prehistoric South Asia (the subcontinent); China; Japan and Korea; and Southeast Asia. A comprehensive matrix table of contents offers multiple entry points for fast and independent chronological, topical, or geographical searches. Printed on durable card stock, pages feature fine details and easy-to-read lettering for making clearly visible photocopies. Recommended for grades 7 and up. Reviewed in UCLA Center for East Asian Studies Curriculum Resources http://www.isop.ucla.edu/eas/web/curric-web.htm Available from Social Studies School Services ($165): http://socialstudies.com

Citation: The Diagram Group. New York: Facts on File ($185.00)

Media Type: Book

At The Tomb of Tutankhamen

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its well done interactive site on the site of Tutankhamen. Information on the IMAX movie, Mysteries of Egypt, can also be found here. Teacher materials. Topics and materials include background information on the site of Tutankhamen including correspondence and author information. Written in first-person story-form are the first three days of Williams’ journey into the tomb. Photos are included. Start by looking at the activity guides(under Links and Resources) which include archaeology, architecture, art, geography, math & science, and writing to learn how you can integrate Egypt across the curriculum.This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas.

Avalon Project – Yale University

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Recommended because it provides english translations of many of the most important primary source documents concerning the Middle East, 1910 to present. Start by reading the Sykes-Picot Agreement and Balfour Declaration – two critical moments in the history of the region.

Ayasophia. (199?, 26 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on Ayasofia in Istanbul. Topics and materials: A visit to Ayasofia includes a historical overview of this great monument completed in 537 for the Emperor Justinian as a church, and converted to a mosque after the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. Explores the treasures and tales of the spectacular building in Istanbul, now a museum whose gardens house the largest Ottoman royal tombs, containing the bodies of a number of sultans and princes. Directed by Suha Arin for MTV-Istanbul. Recommended for middle and high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU. This video is also available through the University of Arizona. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Babylon, 580 BC

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its extensive information on Babylon under the rule of King Nebuchadnezzar. Topics and materials include The City, The People, The History, Image Galleries, and Discussion Forums. The site includes information such as daily life, mathematics, major sites, law, culture, literature, astronomy, star signs, and the planets. I recommend The City link for information such as history, location and maps as well as important landmarks such as the Tower of Babel, the Hanging Gardens and more. Be aware of the fact that this link is not a reliable source for further web connections. This resource originally recommended by Columbia University. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/14/02.

Babylonian and Egyptian Mathematics

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Recommended because of its information on how Babylonians and Egyptians contributed to math. Click on Babylonian Mathematics to learn more about an overview of Babylonian math, Babylonian numerals, Pythagoras’s theorem in Babylonian mathematics, a history of Zero. Click on Egyptian Mathematics for an overview, Egyptian papyri, Egyptian numerals and a history of zero. I recommend following some of the links listed near the bottom of the page especially the History Topics Index link. This resource was originally recommended by Columbia University.

Balkan Ghosts : A Journey Through History (Vintage Departures)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because “Balkan Ghosts” is perhaps the most influential book in America which deals with the subject of the Balkans. It seeks to explain the maze of ethnic groups in Southeastern Europe as well as the conflicts and grievances that exist between them. Admirers claim that Kaplan succeeds admirably in making sense of the Balkans for outsiders, especially the ethnic conflicts of the former Yugoslavia. Critics charge that Kaplan is a dilettante who writes well but lacks anything more than a superficial understanding of Balkan society and history. Availability: this book may be purchased through Amazon.com for $11.20.

Citation: Robert D. Kaplan (paperback, 307 pages, Reprint edition, March 1994)

Media Type: Book

Battle of Algiers (1966, 125 minutes)

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Recommended because it shows Algeria’s struggle of independence.Gillo Pontecorvo. Images and Echoes (NYU). Topics and materials: This vivid reenactment of the Algerian struggle for independence from France, 1954-1962, is presented in documentary style from the point of view of the FLN fighters. It graphically presents the contrast both architecturally and culturally between the medina, the old city, and the European metropolis, with the FLN employing elements of both cultures in their struggle against the French army. The brutalization of the French recruits and the descent of all combatants into terrorism make this film a classic of cinema verit

Media Type: Media

Conflicts in the Middle East Virtual Classroom (Religions of the Middle East; Ethnic Diversity and Conflict in the Middle East) (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides an overview and the background of conflicts in the Middle East. This site was created for the classroom. Start by clicking the Ottoman Empire link for a great introduction to the former Empire whose borders and territories largely correlate to what we think of as the Middle East today. The Ottoman Empire is a great place to start when discussing Middle East History, and should be included. Be aware of the explanation of Islamic Shar ‘ia law. Islam is considered to be a way to organize a society as much as a religion.

Constantinople and the Fall of Rome (Texas)

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Recommended because of its overview of Constantine and his role in the Middle East. This site was created for the classroom. Topics and materials include an overview of Constantine including why Constantine moved his government, Constantinople and the Christian Emperor. You may find the link to Christianity also helpful. This resource originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/14/02.

Contemporary Politics in the Middle East (2000)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it defines the Middle East and discusses Orientalism, Colonial Rule, Nationalism, Political Economy, War and Peace, Political Islam, Democratization, Women, and Ethnicity and Minorities.

Citation: Milton-Edwards, Beverly. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.

Media Type: Book

Crusades (1995, 50 minutes each, 4 tapes)

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Recommended because it examines the reasons for the Crusades, the creation of a mythology of knights and chivalry and the legacy of distrust between East and West. Though some viewers may be offended by the occasional flippant remark (the narrator is a member of the Monty Python Flying Circus team), the videos are more successful in portraying multiple perspectives on the Crusades than the average U.S. textbook. In Part III, focusing on the Second Crusade, a “newscast from the past” includes interviews with participants in events in various parts of the world. Fabricated historical advertisements for 1144 A.D. capture the viewer’s attention, particularly promotion of pepper, a new spice from the West. The series does present as contemporaneous events that may be 40 years apart, but it is possible to make a game of identifying the variance. (Younger students could write their own script for interviews across a particular time period.) [EDB] Directed by Alan Ereira &David Wallace for the BBC. Recommended for middle and high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU. Also available at Washington University for teachers in the Northern Pacific and Upper Midwest States. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Cyrus the Great

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its Iran/Persia history, 580-529 BC and information on Cyrus the Great. Topics and materials include Bas Relief, Cyrus, cylinder, Pasargad, army robes, and links. Start by clicking on CYRUS to find an introduction to Persia and Cyrus.There are embedded links highlighted in blue to Achaemenide Achievements and Darius I here as well. The Pasargad link takes you to a blueprint of Cyrus’ palace or to a tale of Alexander visiting Cyrus’ tomb. Army Robes includes a background of why the army chose certain colors along with pictures of the gear. I recommend using this site as a brief introduction to the creation of Persia. This resource originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/04/02.

Egypt: Land of Ancient Wonders (55 minutes) (Utah)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on the Ancient Wonders of Egypt. Topics and materials: Film on Egypt from the Egyptian Travel Authority of Los Angeles. This video interweaves modern Egypt with its historical, religious, geographical, and cultural wonders. It includes segments on: the Nile, Cairo, the ancient Egyptian pyramids, the Luxor Valley, Aswan Dam, the Suez Canal, and Alexandria. Grades 7 and up. Available for loan through the University of Utah. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Middle East Center at the University of Utah 4/29/02.

Media Type: Media

Egypt: The Habit of Civilization (1991, 57 minutes)

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Recommended because of its look at Pharaonic Egypt. Topics and materials: Part of a six-part PBS series, this installment explores the civilization of Pharaonic Egypt and its influence on later cultures. The early section examines its monuments (primarily pyramids), hieroglyphic writings, and rituals and beliefs centering around divine kingship and the realm of the dead. When he’s not indulging in overly dramatic displays (a midnight excursion inside a pyramid or the scaling of same), writer/director Michael Wood gives a fairly thorough history of this civilization that lasted from 3100 B.C. until Alexander invaded Lower Egypt in 332 BC He provides a detailed account of the Coptic Christian presence and Christian influences over time. Islam is unfortunately introduced with the image of men on camels in a hazy desert. Despite the inaccuracy of some images and Michael Wood taking on the role of “discoverer,” this film gives a detailed explanation of Pharaonic history and its continuing relationship with 20th century civilization. [AGF] Produced and directed by Michael Wood for PBS. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Egyptology Resources

Posted by: globaledadmin on Thursday, December 24, 2009

Recommended because of its resources on Egyptology. Click on “Essential Resources“, under “Main Pages” for links to sites on Copts, Byzantine Egypt, Ptolemeic Egypt, an Ancient Egyptian dictionary, and many others.  I recommend teaching about Christian Egypt to get away from stereotyping, and provide a fuller picture of the history and culture.  Materials include: journals, magazines, organizations, societies, interesting Egypt pages, personal Egypt pages, other resources.  This site comes recommended by Education Index, Suite101.com, Excellence in Education, and LookSmart Editor’s Choice and the University of Texas.

Electronic Literature Foundation (Arabic)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because teachers and educators developing a teaching unit or lesson plan focusing on the Arabian Nights will find this to be very helpful. The stories are meant to be viewed online and have illustrations included. Start by reading the especially helpful article
by Professor Daniel Beaumont explaining the background and history of the Nights. Navigation through the tales is found on the left side of the page. Be aware of the fact that not all stories are recommended for all age groups due to content and subject matter; it is recommended to review the tales before presenting them in the classroom. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Encyclopaedia Iranica (Persian)

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Recommended because the Iranica Online is a searchable database of everything Iranian, classical and modern. Start by Of most interest is its index filled with literary figures and their biographies. Be aware of having the correct spellings of the authors’ names before searching for an item as incorrect spelling will yield. Iranica uses the Library of Congress standard of Farsi transliteration spelling guidelines. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Exploring Ancient World Cultures

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Recommended because of its historical information on ancient societies, including the Near East, Egypt, and Early Islamic World. The Near East has information including Hammurabi’s Code of Laws, The Book of Genesis, The Book of Exodus, The Book of the Prophet Amos, The Story of Job and much more. The section on Egypt has: The Papyrus of Ani (The Egyptian Book of the Dead) and The Egyptian Culture Reflected in Worship with further links to pyramids and Tutankhamen. The Early Islamic World includes the following selections from the Qur’an: The Cow, The Women, The Table, Jonah and Mary. It also includes an Introduction to Islam. This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas.

From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians

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Recommended because of its information and resources on the rise of Christianity, based on scientific study. Topics and materials include Jesus’ Many Faces, A Portrait of Jesus’ World, The Story of the Sotroytellers, The First Christians, and Why Did Christianity Succeed? I recommend reviewing the Teacher’s Guide for Program Summaries, About the Teacher Guide, Maps, Timeline, Activities, and Glossary. This resource originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/08/02.

Frontline — Hunting bin Laden (Ethnic Diversity and Conflict in the Middle East)

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Recommended because of the information it provides on Osama bin Laden and the al-Qaida terrorist network. This site was chosen because it continues to be one of the most informative sites (recognized by most academic institutions and National Resource Centers) on Osama bin Laden and his role in the September 11 terrorist attacks in the U.S. Strengths of this site — timeline of bin Laden’s life, background information on bin Laden’s involvement in previous terrorist activities, and all information is presented in unbiased way with all the facts available for research. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 06/2002.

Guardian’s Egypt

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Recommended because of the many good interactive activities on Ancient Egypt under the KIDS link. Topics and materials include CyberJourney, discuss Egypt, pyramids, mummies, hieroglyphs, gods/goddesses, kids section and more. Start by browsing through the Kids Section. Resources under the KIDS link include build a scale model of the Great Pyramid, Mummy Quiz, Ancient Egyptian Sports, The Myth of Osiris & Isis, Mummy Mask Making, The Pyramid Builders, Mummified-The Match Game, Clickable Mummy, Mummy Lesson Plan, Build a Pharaoh, Egypt Kid Quiz, Egyptian Coloring Book,and much, much more. This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas.

Guide to the Mideast Peace Process: Reference Documents

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Recommended because of its information on the Arab-Israeli Conflicts. Topics and materials include Introduction, Bilateral Negotiations, Multilateral Negotaitions, Fruits of Peace and Diagrams. Click here for more information on Reference Documents such as The Balfour Declaration, The Mandate for Palestine, Camp David Accords, etc.

Gulf War: Operation Desert Storm, The Complete Story (199?, 120 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on the Persian Gulf War. Independent Television News (NYU) Topics and materials: This video serves as a record of the episode in the Persian Gulf. It examines the context in which the conflict occurred, the development of “Desert Shield”, and the escalation towards full scale military war. With the lines of battle drawn, the two protagonists emerged as Norman Schwarzkopf and Saddam Hussein. A profile of each is included in the program, helping to bring into focus the pressures and dilemmas each faced. Produced by Independent Television News. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Half the World (1978, 58 minutes)

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Recommended because of its focus on 17th century Isfahan. Topics and materials: This video examines the rule and accomplishments of Shah Abbas, who returned Persia to power in the 17th century with a focus on Isfahan as an imperial city, and how the bazaar, Royal Mosque and other architecture fit into daily life. Also examines artistic creations — carpets, metalwork, pottery and tilework — created during this period in a distinctive style that has come to characterize Persian design. Includes commentary by Oleg Grabar and John Gurney. Narrated by David Frost. A part of the Crossroads of Civilization Series. Recommended for middle and high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Helping Students Deal With Cultural Differences

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, May 10, 2004

Recommended because this article contains practical strategies to help teachers and students confront cultural differences. The strategies can serve as the basis for lessons on cultural diversity adaptable to almost any instructional setting. Includes some specific learning activities and background material on how personal space is utilized and defined. The strategies discussed are particularly useful as it relates to examining Africa’s cultural diversity.

Citation: White, J. J. (1998). The Social Studies, 107-111.

Media Type: Book

History for kids!

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its information on Islam geared towards young people. Topics and materials include History (with timeline), Environment (with maps), Religion, Clothing, Food, People, Art, Architecture, Books about Islam, Crafts and Projects, and Teacher’s Guides. Includes information on the Umayyad caliphs, Abbasids, Baghdad, Seljuk Turks and Ottomans. Be aware of the fact that you will need to click on the Islam link at the top of the page to access the Islam tour. This resource was recommended by Georgetown University.

Images of the Orient: Nineteenth-Century European Travelers to Muslim Lands. A Unit of Study for Grades 9-12 (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it gives “a first-hand look, through historical primary sources, at the experiences of Europeans traveling to distant lands. Students gain insight into how the works of these travelers influenced the perception of Islam and Muslims” (CIE), Nineteenth Century. Topics and materials include a Teacher’s Guide with approach and rationale; Teacher Background Materials including unit overview, unit context, correlation to national standards for world history, unit objectives, introduction to Images of the Orient, and lesson plans; and Student Materials including pilgrims & tourists, archaeologists, artist, architects, & photographers, colonial officials, political figures, literary figures, maps, notes, and bibliography. Available for purchase through CIE at www.cie.org. Also the OSU Middle East Studies Center has this unit available for loan to teachers of the central Ohio region. Also available through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/28/02.

Citation: Susan Douglas. University of California. Council on Islamic Education and National Center for History in the Schools. 86 pages.

Media Type: Book

Internet Ancient History Source Book (Chicago)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its extensive links and information on the Ancient world. Topics and materials include studying history, human origins, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Persia, Israel, Greece, Hellenistic World, Rome, Late Antiquity, and Christian Origins. The home page of this web site also has a link to Ancient History in the Movies, which has suggestions for movies related to the part of the world being studied and provides annotations.

Internet Ancient History Source Book — Persia (Chicago)

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Recommended because of its information and extensive list of links to Persia. Topics and materials include Persia: General, Acheaminids (560-330 CE), Parthia and Arcsacids (247 BCE-226 CE), Sassanids (224-636 CE), Persian religions, art & architecture, and modern perspectives on Ancient Iran. I also recommend following the link on Christian Origins, on the left-hand side of the page. Topics and materials include Christian Origins, Source Problems, Jesus of Nazareth, Early Church,and more. Be aware of the fact that some of the links can not be found.

Internet Islamic History Book (Chicago)

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Recommended because of its internet resources on the history of Islam. Topics and materials include Pre-Islamic Arab World, Muhammad & Foundations (to 632 CE), Islamic Expansion & Empire (to 750 CE), The Abbasid Caliphate (after 750 CE), Al-Andalus: Muslim Spain, Muslim Persia, Egypt and North Africa,Muslim Religious Development, and The Turks. You have to start by clicking on Islamic History Section. From the Main Page it is also possible to chose Internet Ancient History Sourcebook to obtain information about Mesopotamia, Egypt, Persia, and Isreal.

Internet Jewish History Source Book (Chicago)

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Recommended because of its internet resources on Jewish History. Topics and materials include People of Israel, Emergence of Judaism, Jewish Middle Ages, Jewish Life Since Enlightenment and Further Resources on Jewish History. Be aware of the fact that many links, especially those under The People of Israel, are unable to be found.

Internet Medieval Sourcebook — Byzantium (Chicago)

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Recommended because of its internet resources on the study of Byzantium. Topics and materials include General, Foundations, Justinian (b.483- r.527-d.565), After Justinian, Iconoclasm, Byzantine Imperial Centuries (843-1204), Final Centuries, Byzantine Religion, Byzantine Commonwealth and Accounts of Byzantium. Be aware the Byzantium period is seen as a western phenomenon, but arose in Turkey. It is also important to understanding the spread of Christianity. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/15/02.

INTEZAAR (Waiting) (1995, 26 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on the refugee camps of Gaza.Rashid Masharawi. (NYU) Topics and materials: Stemming from the director’s personal experience of growing up in a Gazan refugee camp, the film offers a critical and provocative scrutiny of these camps, which were established by the UN in 1948 as temporary housing. Interviewing family and friends, Masharawi explores the despair of this semi-permanent condition of existence. Directed by Rashid Masharawi. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Iraq: The Cradle of Civilization (1991, 57 minutes)

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Recommended because of its history of ancient Iraq. Topics and materials: In another installment of the six-part PBS Legacy series, Michael Wood visits Iraq, and traces the region’s early history as home to some of the oldest and most productive cities in the world. His itinerary includes Irbil, the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world; Baghdad, which became one of the greatest cultural centers after its founding by Arab Muslims in the 8th century; Mosel, once a center for Eastern Christians, and many other sites. He skillfully traces and interweaves the histories of early inhabitants and of religious groups from the days of Ur to the present. Overall, a carefully detailed presentation with fewer intrusive acts than the installment on Egypt. [AGF] Produced and directed by Michael Wood for PBS. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU. For teachers in Northern Pacific and Upper Midwest States, the University of Washington loans this video. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

Islam and Human Rights: Tradition and Politics (1999)

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Recommended because it tackles the question “Do Islam and Islamic law constitute real obstacles to human rights?” In this revised and updated edition, the author offers critical assessments of recent Islamic human rights schemes that dilute or eliminate the human rights protections afforded by international law and compares these both with the Islamic legal heritage and with international human rights law. Contesting stereotypes about a supposedly monolithic Islam inherently incompatible with human rights, Mayer dissects the political motives behind the selective use of elements of the Islamic tradition by conservative groups opposed to democracy and human rights. The third edition considers recent developments in human rights law and policy. From the Publisher.

Citation: Mayer, Ann Elizabeth. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press.

Media Type: Book

Islam and Islamic History in Arabia and the Middle East

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its insights on Arab views of the Crusades. There are also links to many other topics of importance for this time period in history, such as The Message, The Hijrah, The Umayyads, Islam in Spain, The ‘Abbasids, The Fatimids, The Seljuk Turks, The Ottomans, The Coming of the West, Revival in The Arab East, The Holy Quran, The Faith of Islam, Arabic Literature, and more. The resource was recommended by Columbia University.

Islam in America (1999)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it a much-needed introduction to one of the fastest-growing religious groups in America today, Islam in America surveys the history of Islam in the United States and profiles the life-style, religious practices, and worldviews of American Muslims, considering some of the many ways in which Islam has become an important and visible part of this society. “Introductions to Islam are abundant. But one with a focus on the American experience, written in clear, readable English, with a balanced approach, solid documentation, and a list of resources with helpful annotations, is rare. Jane I. Smith’s Islam in America has all these characteristics.” Middle East Journal.

Citation: Smith, Jane I. New York: Columbia University Press.

Media Type: Book

Islam: Empire of Faith (PBS)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of the brief overview of Islamic contributions to world culture. The video that accompanies this web site is available for loan through the Middle East Studies Center at The Ohio State University. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Start by clicking on resources for educators. Be aware of difficult navigation. The site map may be better suited to finding specific information.

Islamic Civilizations

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Recommended because of its information on Islamic Civilizations. This site is created for schools and teachers. Topics and materials include Muhammad, Arab Expansion, Baghdad, The Crusades, and Activities. Activities include Baghdad writing frame, jumbled sentence activities, and fill-in-the-gap exercises with topics such as Muhammad’s early years, Why were Arab armies successful?, and the Crusades. The Baghdad writing frame is downloadable. The jumbled sentence and fill-in-the-gap are interactive online activities. I recommend visiting the home page for more great teacher resources. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/16/02.

Islamic World to 1600 (Penn)

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Recommended because of its online tutorial on Islam and its history. Topics and materials include Islamic Beginnings, The Caliphate & the First Islamic Dynasty, Fractured Caliphate & the Regional Dynasties, Mongol Invasions, Rise of the Great Islamic Empires, and The Arts, Learning & Knowledge. Photos and maps are dispersed throughout the tutorial. This site best suited for high school students.

Israel Museum, Jerusalem (Texas)

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Recommended because of its online museum and history of the people of Israel. Topics and materials include Prehistory including Old Stone Age (Lower Paleolithic), Terminal Old Stone Age (Upper Paleolithic), and New Stone Age (Neolithic); Chalcolithic, Bronze, & Iron Ages including Chalcolithic Period, Early Canaanite (Bronze) Period, Intermediate Canaanite (Bronze) Period, Middle Canaanite (Bronze) Period, Late Canaanite (Bronze) Period, Israelite (Iron) I Period, and Israelite (Iron) II Period; Second Temple Period including Persian Period, Hellenistic Period, Herodian Period, and Roman Period; Rise of Christianity & Islam including Byzantine Period, Early Islamic Period, Crusader Period, and Late Islamic Period; Neighboring Cultures; and Numismatic Pavilion. Images of artwork are included along with brief histories. Click on images to get further information about the artwork. This resource originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/17/02.

Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs

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Recommended because it is an official website. It provides information about foreign relations, facts about Israel, government, Jerusalem, History of Israel,peace process, terrorism, anti-semitism, and more. Start by reading the recent news on the main page. Be aware of some readers state that since it is an official government website it is likely to be biased to an Israeli viewpoint.

Lands, Peoples and Communities of the Middle East

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on Middle East culture. Topics and materials: Basic introduction to Middle Eastern contemporary culture, with a predominant focus on the Arab world. Many activities are suggested and provided. Available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02. Be aware of needing to follow the Outreach link to the Print Materials link to access information.

Citation: Juanita Will Soghikian (Texas)

Media Type: Book

Le Lion de Dieu (mid 1970′s, 50 minutes)

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Recommended because of its focus on the martyrdom of Husayn. For this video, professional actors from Tehran staged a carefully orchestrated performance of ta’ziyeh plays in the village of Natanz, Iran. The ta’ziyeh plays narrate and relive the martyrdom of 680 of Husayn, grandson of the Prophet Muhammad; they are enacted during the first 10 days of the Muslim month of Muharram. Though the performances did not take place during Muharram, and the sequence of plays does not follow the order usually established during this religious festival, this video does provide a valuable — and rare — documentary record of ta’ziyeh dramatic representations. Includes interviews with the actors, the oldest of whom has been performing the plays for 50 years. Directed by Jean Baronnet. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

Leo Africanus (1989) (Arabic)

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Recommended because of the fascinating autobiography of Hassan Al-Wazzan, a fifteenth century geographer who came to be known in the west as Leo Africanus or Leo the African. Al-Wazzan was born in Granada before 1492 where, with other Muslim and Jewish families, he flees the ensuing Inquisition. The story of his life is thus told against the backdrop of the 16th century Mediterranean world — the fall of Granada in 1492 — the Ottoman conquest of Egypt – Rome under the Medicis. He is eventually enslaved by pirates and offered as a gift to Pope Leo X who baptizes him as a member of his family, offering him his own name “Johannes Leo Medici.” This work was long on the best seller list in Paris before this wonderful English translation of this fictionalized journal was written for his son. Recommended for 7th-12th grades. Reviewed byAWAIR.

Citation: Maaloof, Amin.

Media Type: Book

LookLex Encyclopedia

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of the information it provides on the Middle East and North Africa. There are also incredible links to maps, slides, and a free Arabic Language course. Topics and materials within the encyclopedia include history, people, up-to-date current events, countries, and more. This information is disseminated through written articles and is accompanied by photos, graphics, sound clips, music clips, and pronunciation clips. Start by clicking on the alphabetical listing of topics offered. Be aware of irritating ads on the page and as pop-ups. This resource was originally recommended by UCLA. Additionally, this site is related to the “Atlas of the Orient” (see above).

Lost City of Arabia (Texas)

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Recommended because of its t.v. program and web site, to be used in conjunction with other sites for Ubar. Topics and materials include remote sensing, interview, desert finds, artifact gallery, map and links. By following the Shop link you can purchase this program for $19.95 or view transcripts on line by clicking the Broadcast Transcript link at the bottom of the web page. I recommend using the Desert Finds link to learn more about the world’s deserts through an interactive map. The study of Ubar can be used for integrating science through remote sensing technology. This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/14/02.

Medieval Islamic Cultures

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Recommended because it is a site developed and sponsored by a K-12 educator at Horace Mann Middle School in San Francisco, CA with support from the University of California – Berkeley. The site highlights life, culture and history of Medieval Islam. It also includes a teacher’s guide . Topics are sectionalized for easy use by Middle School and High School students and information is accurate and written to an appropriate reading level. Start by reading through the teacher’s guide to develop a plan for the use of the site in your classroom or in your curriculum unit. Be aware of the site addresses history standards in the state of California (only). The information on the site, though accurate, was not developed by Middle East academics/experts.

Middle East Maps (MERIA)

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Recommended because of the selection of maps from religious, historical, political perspectives. Topics and materials include distribution of Kurdish people, 6 day war, UK partition plan, Palestinian refugee camps, Israeli Settlement, Arab villages, and the dates of independence. Be aware of it not being Middle East maps in general; the main focus being the Israel/Palestinian conflict.

Middle East Medievalists (Chicago)

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Recommended because of its study of Islamic lands from 500-1500 C.E. Topics and materials include links to About MEM, Lifetime Achievement Award, Board of Directors, MEMbership, MEMber Resources, Search MEMber Directory, and more. Start by going to MEMber Resources to find bibliographic & teaching resources, electronic discussion lists, electronic publications & projects, manuscript archives, and scholarly societies, organizations, & directories.

Middle East Review of International Affairs, MERIA

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Recommended because of its web resources on the Military in the Middle East. Topics and materials include Overall Assessments, History of 20th Century Warfare in the Middle East, Military Factors in the Israel-Arab Conflict, Armed Forces by Country including Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Syria, Turkey & Yemen, External States & Arms Sales, and Weapons of Mass Destruction. There are well over 100 web resources to be found here. This resource originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/18/02.

Middle East Review of International Affairs, MERIA (Texas)

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Recommended because of its resources of information on the Middle East. Topics and materials include Search, Research Guides, Free Books, US Mideast Policy, Current Contents, Links, What is MERIA? and the GLORIA Center.The GLORIA Center is an informative sister site. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/19/02. This resource originally recommended by the University of Texas. Start by looking in the Research Guides.

Middle East Virtual Classroom

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Recommended because of its overview of the Middle East. This site was created for the classroom. Topics and materials include Many Things in Common, the Arabs, deserts, Bedouins, Oil, Dead Sea, Suez Canal, Aswan Dam, The Nations, and links. The Nations section includes a table of population density and includes nation, population, area, density, arable land, or Muslim population. The table can be sorted by any of these headings. Be aware of the fact that this site is suitable for students of all ages but is geared towards younger students. The information given is very simple and brief. This source recommended by the University of Texas.

Modern History of the Middle East (Washington)

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Recommended because of its extensive list of links to modern issues in the Middle East. Topics and materials include lists of links such as Current Political Issues, General, Algeria, Israel-Arab Conflicts & Accords, Arab-/Muslim-American, Jordan, Para-States & Freelance Groups: Abu Nidal, Bin Laden, etc., Kurdistan, Cyprus, Libya, Desert Storm/Iraq-Kuwait Disputes, Sudan, Iraq-UN Issues / WMD, Turkey, Iran, Western Sahara, Other Links, and Gulf States. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/18/02.

Muhammad

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it focuses on the Prophet Muhammad’s life for Grades 4-7, younger for reading aloud.More than any other children’s book available, this biography of the prophet Muhammad reflects the literary and artistic traditions of the Islamic world. Like most Arab texts, it begins with the words, “In the name of God, the All-Merciful, the All-Compassionate,” and an Arabic honorific always follows Muhammad’s name. The readily understandable narrative tells the stories of Muhammad’s life as Muslim children hear them, beginning with his birth in Mecca and ending with the declaration that although Muhammad has died, God never will. In keeping with Islamic artistic tradition, the paintings do not portray the face or body of the Prophet; instead they show his silhouette in gold leaf. Using the ancient Persian miniature style, Demi ignores scale and paints primarily in two dimensions (so that, for instance, worshippers do not appear to be kneeling on a rug so much as superimposed on it). With dramatic scenes extending past the borders of the intricately patterned frames, the art will be a continual source of interest for young people. Demi weaves together selections from the Qur’an and an overview of Islam in this excellent retelling of the Prophet’s life that combines beauty and scholarship. Reviewed by Booklist.

Citation: Demi and Bakhtiar, Laleh MargaretK. McElderry Books, 2003

Media Type: Book

Muhammad: A Short Biography (1997)

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Recommended because it offers an in-depth account of Muhammad’s life and explores his central role both in the early development of Islam and today. Fascinating reading for Muslims and non-Muslims alike. From the Publisher.

Citation: Forward, Martin. Rockport, MA: Oneworld Publications.

Media Type: Book

New Frontiers: The Middle East Following WWI (1985, 25 minutes)

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Recommended because of its information on the Middle East after WWI. Topics and materials: Perhaps the most useful installment of this 14-part series, this video focuses on one of the major historical sources of Middle East tension: the redrawing of the region’s map following the World War I. The 19th century colonial encroachment in North Africa and the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire become intelligible to all, supported by adroit use of film clips and photographs, as well as superior graphics. Explanation of the millet system and of religious as distinguished from territorial identity under the Ottoman Empire clarify the struggle to redefine identity in national terms within the new states emerging from Mandate status into independence. A few, small errors: Kurdistan bridges four rather than three countries, with northern Syria overlooked; nor does Kurdistan extend all the way to the Arabian Gulf. For the most part, though, New Frontiers is a brilliant film carrying out the promise of offering “understanding beyond the headlines.” [EFB] Directed by Boiteau & Stansfield for TV Ontario and Mideast Productions. Narrated by Richard Bulliet. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

Nova Online: Treasures of the Sunken City

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its usefulness for K-12 teachers developing a teaching unit on Ancient Alexandria in Egypt. Strengths of this site include a complete explanation of the Ancient Lighthouse at Alexandria (as well as the other 7 wonders of the Ancient World) and how it was found, streaming video of the actual TV program, includes a teacher’s guide with ideas and suggestions from other teachers on lesson plan activities. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 07/2003.

NPR : The Middle East and the West, A Troubled History

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Recommended because it is a special six-part series in which NPR’s Mike Shuster examines the long and turbulent history of Western involvement in the Middle East, from the crusades to the wars in Iraq. The series includes The Crusades: Two Centuries of Holy War, The Rise of the Ottoman Empire, Europe Carves Up the Middle East, World War I and its Aftermath, The Rise of the U.S. in the Middle East, and The Clash with Islam. Each part includes relevant maps and bios. Start by reading the bios of historic figures in the series.

Online Resource Book for Medieval Studies, ORB

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Recommended because of its extensive links and information on the Medieval period. Topics and materials include What’s New in ORB?, The ORB Encyclopedia, The ORB Textbook Library, What Every Medievalist Should Know, Resources for Teaching, Of General Interest, External Links, and more. This is an academic site maintained by scholars of Medieval studies.

Oriental Institute, University of Chicago (Texas)

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Recommended because of its extensive information on ancient history in the Near East. Topics and materials include table of contents, ABZU, research archives, museum, museum education, store, development, electronic resources, research & projects, and publications. I recommend using ABZU for its electronic resources, especially on Egypt and Mesopotamia. Also, visit the virtual galleries which can be found under the Museum link. Here there are several galleries including The New Egyptian Gallery, The New Persian Gallery, The Virtual Museum, Highlights from the Collections, and Photographic Archives. Here there are also lists to recommended readings. Follow Museum Education to find Outreach Programs, Loan Materials, and Teacher Resources. This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/03/02.

Origins and Evidence (1978, 58 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on Cyrus and Darius. Topics and materials: Exploring a crucial stage in the evolution of civilization, this program profiles Cyrus and Darius, and examines the role of each in the development of the Persian empire. While piecing together this story, the film illustrates why the Iranian plateau became crucial in geographical, political and historical terms. Narrated by David Frost. Recommended for middle and high school students. Crossroads of Civilization series (NYU). Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

Ottoman Empire: 1280-1663 (26 Minutes) (Utah)

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Recommended because of its information on the Ottoman Empire. Eight centuries after the Turks emerged from their homeland in the steppes of Central Asia, they captured the Byzantine city of Constantinople,changed its name to Istanbul, and made it their new capital, which lasted for four centuries. This video discusses the many Ottoman Sultans, their successes and failures, and covers the whole history of the Ottoman Empire. It is a good video to use as an introduction or throughout a unit on the Ottoman Empire. Grades 10 and up. Available for loan through the University of Utah. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by the Middle East Center at the University of Utah, 4/29/02.

Media Type: Media

Ottoman Web Site

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its information on the Ottoman era. Topics and materials include Sultans, Profiles, Album, Events, Our Selection and Chronology. Under Sultans you can find information about each sultan and activities for which they are famous. Profiles lists information such as ranks, Sultanates & the Age of Sultans, causes of death, throne abandonments, etc. The Album link hosts miniatures, palaces, paintings, tugras(seals), maps and more. The Our Selection link hosts several important events, topics, etc. of the Ottomans and the Chronology link addresses dates from 1299-1924. This resource was recommended by UCLA.

Palestinian Refugee Research Net

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Recommended because of its information on Palestinian Refugees. Topics and materials include UNRWA: Emergency Appeal for the West Bank and Gaza; Background including an overview, Middle East peace process, and key issues; Research Materials including projects, papers, documents, and internet resources; Related Activities including conferences, workshops, and dialogue; and Keeping Up-to Date where you can find the latest news. This resource recommended by Harvard University. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/18/02.

Persepolis Terrace (Chicago)

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Recommended because of its archaeological study of Persepolis, palace complex of Darius the Great. Topics and materials include archaeological blue prints of the palace including Palace Complex: Structures, Reliefs, and Inscriptions, The Throne Hall, The Gate of Xerxes, The Treasury, The Palace of Darius, The Palace of Xerxes, and much more. Each of these includes links to photographs demonstrating how the palace looks today. Good for older students. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/14/02.

Persian Heritage Foundation

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Be aware of the fact that this site is still under construction and most of the links are inaccessible. We will be removing this site from our list in 2-3 months if construction is not complete.

Persian Iran (Columbia)

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Recommended because of its information on Persepolis and the Achaemenian period of Persia. Topics and materials include a modern day Persian web site. For information on Persepolis follow the Tourism link and click on Persepolis. This site has a nice history of the city and places of interest including Pasargad. Click on the History link to find information on the Achaemenian Dynasty. Here you will get history, maps, and photos relating to this time period. This resource originally recommended by Columbia University. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/14/02. Be aware of the fact that we are currently experiencing technical difficulties with this site. Contact has been made and this site may be eliminated in the future.

Personal Diary of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

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Recommended because of its first person account of the conflicts. Topics and materials include a photodiary with excerpts. The Diary Index includes entries, sections, what’s new?, links, and more. Entries can be viewed chronologically or by theme. Themes include Intifada, Ramallah, closure, Birzeit, Palestinian Authority, ‘On the Ground in Ramallah’, Hebron, Abu Ghnaim, demolition of my home, and media. Follow the Author link to learn more about the author, his printed works, and other activities. This resource recommended by Harvard University. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/18/02.

Petra (Texas)

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Recommended because of its clickable map of Petra, basic history written in simple terms. Topics and materials include clickable map, the Siq, the Khazneh, Royal Tombs, High Place of Sacrifice, El-Deir, links to other Petra sites. The home page includes a background and location information includinga link to the modern city of Amman. Each of the pages is highlighted with thumbnails (small photos) which you can click on to see an enlarged photo. There are several links embedded in the text which you can follow for more information or enlarged photos. This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/04/02.

Petra, The Great Temple Excavation

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Recommended because of its history of Petra in Jordan. Topics and materials include a history of Petra and the Nabataeans. There is also a photographic tour of the Great Temple. Click Excavations to obtain a summary of past excavations at Petra as well as 9 years worth of reports. This resource war originally recommended by the University of Texas.

Science in Medieval Islam

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its view on science in Medieval Islam. Turner explores the history of Islamic civilization and the Islamic emphasis on learning that led to the medieval Islamic accomplishments in science, mathematics, medicine, astronomy, astrology, geography and other fields. He also discusses their effects. Recommended for middle and high school students. Available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware you will need to follow the Outreach link to the Print Materials link to access information. Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Howard R. Turner (262 pages)

Media Type: Book

Scrolls from the Dead Sea (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its study of Dead Sea Scrolls and the region of the Dead Sea, Israel and Jordan. Topics and materials include an exhibit beginning at the Introduction-The World of the Scrolls link. Also included are links to the Qumran library, Qumran community, Today-2,000 Years Later, Conclusion, Outline of Topics and Objects in the Dead Sea Scrolls, Project Judaica, and a list of teacher resources on the Dead Sea Scrolls. I recommend the Introduction link to find a map of the region, the Qumran community link to learn more about this time period, and Resource materials for teachers to learn more about films, books, and other resources related to the Dead Sea Scrolls. I recommend using this in conjunction with the movie listed below, Secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls. This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/08/02.

Step Pyramid Complex of Djoser

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Recommended because of its interactive blue print. Egyptian complex, 2800BC. Topics and materials include an interactive blueprint of the Complex of Djoser. Click on different parts of the complex to see photos of how it looks today. I recommend following the Egypt Revealed link to find out more information on archaeology in Egypt. This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/04/02.

Suleyman The Magnificent (1987, 57 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on Suleyman the Magnificent. Serious scholarship is popularized, but never trivialized in this companion video to the exhibition of the same name shown at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In the 16th century, the brilliant and powerful Sultan S

Media Type: Media

Teacher’s Supplements for Middle Eastern Studies

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Recommended because of the cultural resources on the Middle East. Topics and materials: Teacher’s resource guide containing proverbs, folktales, folk songs, folk dances, recipes, a glossary of key terms, alphabets, numbers and greetings divided respectively between Iran, Israel, Turkey and the rest of the Arab world. Recommended for middle school students. Available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware you will need to follow the Outreach link to the Print Materials link to access information. Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Ellen Fairbanks-Bodman, Annette W.Pomeroy. Middle East Outreach Council. (Texas)

Media Type: Book

Teaching About Islam & Muslims in the Public School Classroom: A Handbook for Educators

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Recommended because of its sensitivity to the Islamic culture, the focus on teacher education, and its clear explanation of Islam and associated issues. This is an insightful work on Islam good for any teacher from grades k-12. Topics and materials included in this book are basic beliefs, the Five Pillars, Islamic law, Muslim calendar, gender and family issues, life and death, daily life, contemporary issues such as Jihad, Black Muslims, and Malcolm X. There is also a glossary of relevant Arabic words defined in simple, easy-to-understand terms, a 2Slavic and Eastern Europe-page annotated listing of further recommended resources, as well as a list of resources not suggested for classroom use. I recommend this as a handbook to any teacher in need of guidance on Muslims and Islamic culture. Available for purchase at the above web address. This book may be borrowed from Ohio State University, Middle East Studies Center, and University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for contact information). Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 3/25/02.

Citation: Fountain Valley, CA: Council on Islamic Education. 117 pages. $11.00.

Media Type: Book

The Amazing Adventures of Ibn Battuta

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Recommended because of its tales of Ibn Battuta. This book chronicles the adventures of Ibn Battuta, a Moroccan explorer living during the Golden age of the Islamic world (12th, ?13th Centuries), who travels all the way to China. The book is illustrated and written in very simple language. Recommended for primary school students. Available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware you will need to follow the Outreachlink to the Print Materials link to access information. Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Noura Durkee

Media Type: Book

The Ancient Hebrews

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Recommended because of its historical information on the origins of the Jewish Faith. Topics and materials: Describes the history and origins of the Jewish faith, the ancient Hebrews, and traces the history of Judaism to the modern day. Although the book appears designed for a young audience, the language is more appropriate for more advanced students. Recommended for middle school students. Available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware you will need to follow the Outreach link to the Print Materials link to access information. Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Kenny Mann. 80 pages (Texas)

Media Type: Book

The Arabs: Activities for the Elementary School Level ?- The Things that Make for Peace: Empowering Children to Value Themselves and Others (1991)

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Recommended because of its its activities geared towards children to promote tolerance and acceptance of Arab peers. Topics and materials: A teaching guide filled with suggested experiential activities aimed at fostering respect amongst children for their Arab counterparts. Recommended for primary school students. Available for purchase online through AWAIR at: http://www.telegraphave.com/gui/awairproductinfo.html. It is also available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02. Be aware of needing to follow the Outreach link to the Print Materials link to access information at the University of Texas.

Citation: Audrey Shabbas, Carol El-Shaieb and Ahlam An-Nabulsi

Media Type: Book

The Best Eid Ever

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Recommended because it teaches young students about the important Muslim holiday of Eid and many of the Muslim traditions and values associated with it. Start by reading the review on the astrolabe web site.

Citation: Asma Mobin-Uddin

Media Type: Book

The Christian Coptic Orthodox Church of Egypt

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides a brief yet concise history of the Christian Coptic Orthodox Church in Egypt. There are an extensive number of hyperlinks found throughout this page with further information on religious practices, meanings, and explanations for the Christian religion according to CCOCE.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

The Cities of Islam: Cairo (1987, 25 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on Cairo. This slightly faded rendering of Cairo gives a brief sense of the city’s history from its medieval beginnings under the Fatimids and as a major stop along trade routes from Arabia to Africa. Also traces its rich cultural and religious heritage. The context is mostly architectural and artistic, rather thanpolitical or historical, describing the walled city under Saladin, the mausoleums and monuments of the Mamluks, and Muhamad Ali’s mosque built while Egypt was part of the Ottoman Empire. Contains footage of streets and souks, focusing on artisans of “traditional” trades such as metalwork, inlay, and leather. Common pitfalls are scenes of camels in the desert as a representation of Cairo and Arabs, who are at one point called a “desert people.” At times the film implies (erroneously) that little has changed since the Middle Ages. [AGF] Directed by John Dooley for Polonius Production. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

The Cities of Islam: Istanbul (1988, 28 minutes)

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Recommended because of its information on history of Istanbul. Topics and materials: The most comprehensive of the series of three, this film gives a useful historic overview for beginning students, describing the city’s successive eras as Byzantium, Constantinople and finally Istanbul, and visiting monuments from each period. Includes visits to the Topkapi palace, Aya Sofia, Blue Mosque and Mosque of Suleiman with (at times overgeneralized) discussions of the architecture of mosques. Includes engaging street scenes illustrating the vitality of the city: a tea vendor serving a customer from his portable urn, men gathered in a shop to smoke hookahs, and wrestlers competing on Prince’s Islands. Each of these three films would profit from pairing with The Islamic City. [AGF] Directed by John Dooley for Polonius Production. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/25/02.

Media Type: Media

The Complete Petra (Penn)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its web resources on Petra. Topics and materials include annotated links to subjects related to Petra such as Overviews and Gateways which also includes a section on history,;Archaeology, Images, Travel & Tourism, Books & Videos suggests reading and viewing materials about Petra. There are many embedded words which provide additional information.

The Concise Encyclopedia of Islam (1991)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because interest in Islam is at an all-time high, and beginners who seek basic information about this world faith tradition will find an excellent resource in A Concise Encyclopedia of Islam. In short alphabetical entries from the Abbasids to the practice of zakat (almsgiving), Gordon Newby presents fundamental facts about the important concepts, people, places and movements in Islam. The entries are quite short (the note on Sufism, for example, is just over 40 lines long), but full of data. The appendices include a chronology, a list of the 99 divine names and a bibliography for further reading. Reviewed by Publisher’s Weekly.

Citation: Newby, Gordon D. Oneworld Publications, 2002

Media Type: Book

The Crusades from Medieval European and Muslim Perspectives: A Unit of Study for Grades 7-12 (1998)

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Recommended because of its look at the Crusades through Muslim and European view points. Topics and materials include a Teacher’s Guide with approach and rationale; Teacher Background Materials including unit overview, unit context, etc., introduction to The Crusades from Medieval European and Muslim Perspectives, lesson plans, list of key terms, list of key names & places, and teacher resources; and Student Materials including dramatic moments, Crusaders Living in Muslim Lands, Crusader Meets Mujahid: The Military Encounter, and more. Available for purchase through CIE. Also the OSU Middle East Studies Center has this unit available for loan to teachers of the central Ohio region. Also availablefor loan through the University of Texas. (See OSU under Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/28/02.

Citation: Kamran Scot Aghaie. University of California, Los Angeles, Council on Islamic Education and National Center for History in the Schools. 76 pages. $15.00. (OSU)

Media Type: Book

The Descent of Ishtar

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Recommended because of its recount of the Babylonian tale of Ishtar (15 minutes). Topics and materials: An artistic recreation of the ancient Babylonian poetic myth of the goddess Ishtar (c. 1800 BCE). Produced by Scott Noegel and Greg Bowman. Available for loan to teachers in the Northern Pacific and Upper Midwest States though the University of Washington. Reviewed by the Middle East Center at the University of Washington, 4/29/02.

Media Type: Media

The Emergence of Renaissance: Cultural Interactions Between Europeans and Muslims(1999)

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Recommended because of its focus on cultural interactions between Europeans and Muslims from 600-1500 CE. Topics and materials include a teaching unit which addresses topics such as an introduction to Renaissance, Commerce & Travel, Education & Scholarship, Science & Technology, and Visual Arts. Included are texts, activities, primary source materials, maps, charts, slides, and teacher’s guide. Good for middle and high schools. Available for purchase through the Council on Islamic Education. This unit is also available for loan from the NRC at Ohio State University. Be aware of the fact that you can preview excerpts from this unit for free under the Publications link at the CIE web site. Available excerpts are highlighted in blue and are in PDF format. To read them you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/15/02.

Citation: Susan L. Douglass & Karima Diane Alavi. Council on Islamic Education. 332 pages. $75.

Media Type: Book

The Glory of Byzantium

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its overview of the first golden age of the Byzantine period. Topics and materials include an interactive web site including works of art, history, a timeline, glossary and a teacher’s resources.The Works of Art link includes photos of artwork from the Byzantine era. Click on the photos to get more detailed information. The Teacher Guide includes: Byzantine Art: An Introduction, Materials and Techniques, Class Activities, Discussion Topics. I recommend using the timeline to give yourself a nice overview of the Byzantine period which begins in the early fourth century, and ends in the 1400′s with the Ottoman Turks. This resource recommended by Columbia University.

The Gulf War

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Recommended because Recommended for its extensive reports on the Gulf War. Topics and materials include Iraq, Kuwait, Invite US Intervention, US Interests, Build Up, Air War, Ground War, Aftermath, Photos, Maps,and more. Photos are of the main players in the Gulf War including George Bush, Saddam Hussein, Colin Powell, and Norman Schwarzkopf. Be aware of the fact that this is about the first Gulf War. Recommended by Columbia University. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/18/02.

The Gulf War: An In-Depth Examination of the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf Crisis

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Recommended because of its resources and information on the Gulf War. Topics and materials include an Introduction, an Oral History, War Stories, Weapons & Technology, Maps, Voices in the Storm (A BBC Radio Series), Chronology, Appendix, Discussion, Tapes & Transcripts, and Related FRONTLINE Reports: The Survival of Saddam, Spying on Saddam, and Gunning for Saddam. Be aware of the fact that this is about the 1990-1991 Gulf War. This resource recommended by Harvard University. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/18/02.

The Hidden City of Petra (50 minutes) (Utah)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on Petra. Topics and materials: At the dawn of the first millennium, an enterprising desert people defied the forces of nature and carved a rose-colored city out of the stark Jordanian mountains. A narrow passage through a two mile chasm reveals their hidden city. Beneath the stone and desert sands lies Petra, 35 miles of temples, tombs, colonnaded market streets, canal systems and cisterns. In this abandoned city, exquisite frescoes and pottery stand in silent tribute to a highly sophisticated, technologically superior people and their long buried culture. Who were the Nabateans, and why did they build their city in so remote and barren place? Archaeologists today are just beginning to unearth the site and uncover the haunting mystery of what became of the Nabateans, and why their culture vanished so suddenly. (This is a beautiful and interesting video despite some inaccuracies that could be useful in a critical thinking discussion.) Available through the University of Utah. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Middle East Center at the University of Utah, 4/29/02.

Media Type: Media

The History Guy (Michigan)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its information on wars and conflicts in modern history in the Middle East, created for use in the classroom. Topics and materials on “Operation Iraqi Freedom”, The No-Fly Zone War, Afghan Civil War, Attack on U.S.S. Cole, Operation Desert Fox, Saudi-Yemeni Border Conflict, U.S. Iraq conflict, and the Persian Gulf War. Each section includes Alternate Names of the Conflict, Belligerents, Dates of Conflict, Types of Conflict, Related Conflicts, Causes and Descriptions of Conflict, Consequences of Conflict, Casualty Figures, Unique Facts or Trends, and Sources. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/18/02. Be aware of the fact that you will need to scroll down to the bottom of the page and click on the New and Recent Conflicts of the World link. There you will find a chronological listing of events.

The History Guy: Arab-Israeli Wars and Conflicts (Michigan)

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Recommended because of its information and listing of individual Arab-Israeli Wars. Topics and materials include Israeli War of Independence, Sinai War, Palestinian-Israeli Conflicts, Six-Day War, War of Attrition, Yom Kippur-Ramadan War, Osirak Raid, Israeli Invasion of Lebanon, Israeli Occupation of South Lebanon, Second Persian Gulf War, and Intifada. Some of these wars have links to further information highlighted in blue. Start by following theArab-Israeli Links Page, which is found above the chronological listing, to find further information on the individual Arab-Israeli wars and conflicts. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/18/02.

The House of Wisdom (40 pages)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its fiction tale around the turn of the millenium. Topics and materials: From the authors of The Day of Ahmed?s Secret and Sami and the Time of the Troubles comes this new book set in Baghdad at the end of the 1st millennium AD. Ishaq, the son of the chief translator to the Caliph, travels the world in search of precious (review ends). Recommended for primary school students. Available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware you will need to follow the Outreach link to the Print Materials link to access information. Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Florence Parry Heide and Judith Heide Gilliland (Texas)

Media Type: Book

The Killing of Sadat: Why Was Cairo Calm? (1982, 60 minutes)

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Recommended because Recommended for information on Egypt in the1970′s and 1980′s, and for information on the assassination of its head of state, Sadat. Topics and materials: This news program is a perceptive examination of Sadat’s politics, economic policies and persona in Egypt up until his assassination in 1981, expertly compared with the hero-like portrayal of Sadat in the Western, specifically American press. Carefully traces the selective impact of Sadat’s economic and political decisions, which created a wealthy entrepreneurial class replacing the old land-holding rich, but brought little change for the average person. Focuses also on reactions to alignment with the West and to peace accords with Israel; and on alienation of other Arab countries. Includes intelligent, informative interviews with Egyptian journalists, writers, former ministers and advisers to Sadat. Overall, an excellent introduction to conditions in Egypt in the ’70s and ’80s, with eerie echoes for today’s political situation. [AGF] Directed by Ofra Bikel for WBGH TV (Boston). Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Ofra Bikel. WBGH TV (NYU) Recommended for information on Egypt in the1970′s and 1980′s, and for information on the assassination of its head of state, Sadat. Topics and materials: This news program is a perceptive examination of Sadat’s politics, economic policies and persona in Egypt up until his assassination in 1981, expertly compared with the hero-like portrayal of Sadat in the Western, specifically American press. Carefully traces the selective impact of Sadat’s economic and political decisions, which created a wealthy entrepreneurial class replacing the old land-holding rich, but brought little change for the average person. Focuses also on reactions to alignment with the West and to peace accords with Israel; and on alienation of other Arab countries. Includes intelligent, informative interviews with Egyptian journalists, writers, former ministers and advisers to Sadat. Overall, an excellent introduction to conditions in Egypt in the ’70s and ’80s, with eerie echoes for today’s political situation. [AGF] Directed by Ofra Bikel for WBGH TV (Boston). Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02. Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

The Message (1991)

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Recommended because of its reenactment of 7th century Mecca, the Prophet, and the new Muslim religion. This feature film aims to portray the origins of Islam, and is set in 7th century Mecca when Muhammad calls people towards the religion of the “one true God.” The movie depicts the circumstances of the Prophet’s struggle: the political and social conditions in Mecca were not favorable to his call and Mecca was ruled by an idol-worshiping oligarchy which persecuted Muhammad’s early followers. The movie traces the Prophet’s emigration to Medina, the famous battles of Badr and Uhud, and his march back into Mecca, with an army of 10,000 that conquered the city. In keeping with religious sensibilities of Muslims, the Prophet is not shown. The film is well-made and vividly portrays the social, economic and political conditions in pre-Islamic Arabia and the enormous impact Islam had on this society. Part I: 96 minutes; Part II: 76 minutes. [CNES] Produced and directed by Moustapha Akkad. Recommended for middle and high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU. This video is also available through the University of Arizona. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

The Middle East and the Islamic World: Slide set with teacher?s guide

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Recommended because of its its introduction to the Middle East. Topics and materials: An introductory unit on the Middle East including a slide presentation and teacher’s guide and map handouts. Recommended for middle and high school students. Available for loan through the University of Texas. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Be aware you will need to follow the Outreach link to the Print Materials link to access information. Reviewed by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas, 4/29/02.

Citation: Sandra D. Batmangelich (Texas)

Media Type: Book

The Middle East in Transition (45 minutes) (Utah)

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Recommended because of its overview and information on the conflicts of the Midddle East. Topics and materials: This video includes a five-part lesson with an instructional guide which covers: l) An overview of the Middle East; 2) U.S. Interests in the Middle East; 3) The Persian Gulf War; 4) The Arab-Israeli Conflict; 5) Other Middle East Issues, e.g., Islamic Fundamentalism, Saddam Hussein, Kurds, and Iran. Each lesson gives a brief (3-4 minute) overview and then switches to formal presidential advisors (e.g., Henry Kissinger, George Schultz, Alexander Haig, etc.) debating the various issues. Grades 10 and up. Available for loan through the University of Utah. (See Overview-Centers for more information. Reviewed by the Middle East Center at the University of Utah, 4/29/02.

Media Type: Media

The Ottoman Empire

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its information on the Ottomans and their history. Topics and materials include 2 days of lesson plans complete with evaluation, extensions, suggested readings, links, and a vocabulary section with pronunciation sound bytes. Included is a link to the suggested accompanying movie, “Suleyman the Magnificent” available through Discovery School for $39.95. Be aware if you would like to preview the movie prior to purchase follow the “Suleyman the Magnificent” movie link. Here you will be given the option to watch a clip. You will need Real Player for this. Accompanying comprehension questions are also available for download. Follow directions on the screen. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/17/02.

The Parthian Empire

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Recommended because of its valuable information on Persia and Persian history (247-228 BC). Topics and materials include online information about history, geography, coins, art & culture, other resources. Start by following the History link to get an overview of Parthian history as well as find a Timeline of Ancient World Events. This resource originally recommended by Columbia University.

The Prophet and the People Who Opposed Him

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Recommended because it provides a different perspective on the nature of tolerance within Islam. Alam Payind’s comments: “The contents of this article are accepted by both Muslim scholars and Muslim lay persons. This is a known fact that Muslims of the medieval ages were much more tolerant and forgiving than the current extremist and radical Muslims are. Luckily, these extremist groups, though very much vocal and destructive, are minorities in each Muslim majority country. This is the fact that rarely makes the news.” Alam Payind is the director of the Middle East Studies Center at The Ohio State University.

The Road to War in the Persian Gulf (1992, 24 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its information on how WWI effected the Middle East. Topics and materials: This documentary begins with the period just after World War I, when Britain and France divided the Middle East between themselves. The film discusses how the oil resources of Iraq and Kuwait have shaped their history, and traces U.S. involvement in the region, beginning with the Iran-Iraq war and ending with the U.S. led offensive against Iraq that began on January 17th, 1991. The video features interviews with two experts on the Middle East with sharply different views: C. Max Kortepeter of New York University and Peter A. Rodman of Johns Hopkins University. It includes archival footage from ABC News and Independent Television, as well as video footage shot in Iraqi cities during and after the allied bombing. [CNES] Directed and produced by Frank Beck for American School Publishers. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU. This video is also available to teachers of Central Ohio through the Middle East Studies Center at OSU. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

The Runner (1985, 75 minutes)

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Recommended because of its view of life after Iranian Revolution. Topics and materials: This film presents a portrait of southern Iran after the Iranian Revolution through the eyes of six adolescents. “The Runner ranks with those classics of childhood, Shoeshine, Los Olividados, The 400 Blows, and Pixote,” said Judy Stone of the San Francisco Chronicle. Directed by Amir Naderi (NYU) . Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

The Secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls (1991, 60 minutes)

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Recommended because of its information on the Dead Sea scrolls. Topics and materials: This thorough program examines the politics and scholarly history of the discovery, collection, and ensuing publication of the seven Dead Sea Scrolls first unearthed in 1946 in the caves of Qumran. Contains a detailed look at the contents of the texts along with the complicated — and controversial — history of who has controlled their translation and publication. Incorporates interviews with major scholars (including Hebrew & Judaic Studies Professor Lawrence Schiffman of NYU) and figures of the editing team, and presents early and revised theories on the authors of the texts, including archaeological evidence regarding the Essenes, who were originally believed to have written the texts. A fairly scholarly introduction. [AGF] A Nova program produced for PBS by the WGBH Science Unit. Recommended for high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02

Media Type: Media

The Travels of Ibn Battuta — A Virtual Tour with the 14th Century Traveler

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Recommended because of its virtual tour across many countries in the Arab World in medieval times. This site is created by a teacher for the classroom. Topics and materials include Morocco Across North Africa, Cairo, Egypt, On to Syria & Palestine, The Hajj: Medina to Mecca, Persia & Iraq, Further into Persia, The Arabian Sea & East Africa, Anatolia, The Steppe, Return to the Steppes, Delhi, Escape from Delhi, Malaysia & China, Return Home, Andalusia & Morocco, Journey to West Africa, and Writing the Story of Ibn Battuta’s Travels — The Rihla. Reviewed originally by April Lukacsko, 4/17/02.

Topkapi Palace (1991, 21-22 minutes each)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its history of the Ottoman Dynasty. Twenty-four of the thirty-six sultans of the Ottoman Dynasty ruled the empire from the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul for a period of 400 years. The royal residence became a museum after the founding of the Turkish Republic in 1923, and opened its doors to a film crew for the first time 1990. This seven-part series explores the treasures and history of the palace. Directed by Suha Arin for MTV-Istanbul. Recommended for middle and high school students. I recommend visiting the Kevorkian Center to find out more information on each section of this series. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU, the Middle East Center at the University of Washington, and through the University of Arizona. (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

Torchbearers: Bridging the Dark Ages (1985, 25 minutes)

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Recommended because of its focus on the flourishing Islamic civilization. Addresses the flourishing of Islamic civilization, which was quite knowledgeable in sciences, humanities and art while Europe wallowed in isolation. Shows how Islamic culture absorbed, then synthesized the intellectual heritage of the Jews, Romans, Greeks, Persians, Indians and Chinese, transmuting all into a culture that would later be taken over by Europe as a basis for its Renaissance. Some sweeping generalizations may give pause (Were early Muslims really “simple Bedouins from the desert?” Did European scholars really flock to Baghdad, Damascus and Cairo, where resources were all neatly transcribed into Arabic?) But much is useful, and the unique Arab dimension is never lost in sequences representing the Islamic heritage to the West: architecture, math astronomy, alchemy, chess, and the like. [EFB] Directed by Denise Boitteau & David Stansfield. Narrated by Richard Bulliet. Recommended for middle and high school students. Available to teachers in the tri-state area through the Hagop Kevorkian Center at NYU (See Overview-Centers for more information.) Reviewed by Hagop Kevorkian Center, NYU 4/26/02.

Media Type: Media

Turmoil in the Middle East: Imperialism, War, and Political Instability

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Recommended because turmoil in the Middle East highlights the impact of imperialism, war, and political turmoil in the Middle East throughout the course of the twentieth century – from the devastation of the First World War through the many crises and conflicts that have led to cycles of war, uprisings, coups, revolts, and revolutions. It focuses on the internal contradictions of Middle Eastern state driven by the dynamics of class conflict and class struggle in various realms of society and social relations. Berberoglu examines the political economy of long-embedded conflicts and crises in the Middle East, paying special attention to the role of powerful, external forces stemming from Western imperialism and led by Britain, France, and later the United States. From the Publisher.

Citation: Berberoglu, Berch New York: State University of New York Press, 2000

Media Type: Book

Understanding the Contemporary Middle East

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Recommended because scholars in fields as diverse as architecture, sociology, economics, and religion join Gerner (political science, U. of Kansas, Lawrence) in moving beyond the stereotypes of oil derricks and veiled women in a variety of discussions about the contemporary Middle East. Articles include examinations of the region’s geography and its impact on history; local, regional, and international politics; the economic realities of shifting from rural to urban economies; the changing position of women; and kinship and group dynamics. Reviewed by Booknews.

Citation: Gerner, Deborah J. (Editor) Lynne Rienner Publishers Inc,2000

Media Type: Book

War in Iraq

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Recommended for discussion of and sensitivity to issues surrounding war in Iraq and prisoner abuse. New York, Independent Media Center at New York University. (NYU) Online film. Be aware of vidoes being about very sensitive subjects. May not be suitable for elementary and middle school students. Be aware that you will need Real Player to view this movie. Go to http://www.real.com for a free version.

What Islam is All About, Student Textbook (1999)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because (Sorry. There is no review at this time. )

Citation: Emerick, Yahiya. Long Island City, NY: International Books & Tapes.

Media Type: Book

Who are the Taleban?

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its insight into the Taleban. Topics and materials include an article on the Taleban with topics such as Who are the Taleban?, Anti-Corruption, Islamic State, Extending Control and links. I recommend also following the links (on the right hand side of the page) to Osama bin Laden: America’s Most Wanted. Here you will find another article titled ‘Who is Osama Bin Laden?’. This resource recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/18/02.

Women and Power in the Middle East

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a collection of 17 essays analyzing social, political, economic, and cultural forces that shape gender systems in the Middle East and North Africa. Essays document the similarities and differences in the gendering relations of power in 12 countries, providing a framework for understanding broad patterns of gender in the Arab-Islamic world. Subjects include women and work in the Arab world, gender and social citizenship in Palestine, Algerian and Moroccan caricatures of the Gulf War, and women’s organizations in Kuwait. Essays were originally published in the , the journal of the Middle East Research and Information Project. Lacks a subject index. Joseph teaches anthropology and women’s studies at the University of California-Davis. Slyomovics teaches anthropology and women’s studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Reviewed by Book News.

Citation: Joseph, Suad and Slyomovics, Susan (Editors). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 2000

Media Type: Book

Women in Ancient Mesopotamia (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its discussion of the lives of women in Ancient Mesopotamia. Topics and materials include a lesson plan from the Women in World History Curriculum that discusses women in Mesopotamia in relation to the Great Death Pit, the Temple of the Goddess Bau, Enheduanna, Erishti-Aya, Ishtar, an Assyrian business woman, and Hammurabi’s Code. This resource was originally recommended by the University of Texas. Reviewed by April Lukacsko, 4/04/02.