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Africa Action profile on Nigeria and US relations

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Nigerians are the most numerous of African immigrants in the U.S. This website provides useful background on Nigeria and issues related to governance, oil and so forth which affect and are affected by the Nigerian diaspora. The site contains several sections from Africa Action’s article on Nigeria in Great Decisions 2003, the annual briefing book and study series organized by the Foreign Policy Association.

African American

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a documentary set in Ohio’s Central State University, interviewing African and African-American students and examining attitudes and stereotypes held by each about the other. Wright State University film student Askia Holloway recently won best documentary at the Atlanta Independent Film Festival for the film. The 23-minute documentary deals with intra-racial prejudice by viewing the tensions between American-born blacks and blacks from Africa. Holloway interviewed several students from Central State University, a historic black college near Dayton, for the film. African American also has been honored as the Best Regional Short Film at the Cincinnati World Cinema Independent Film Festival and Best Ohio Short Film at the Cleveland International Film Festival. The director can be contacted at hollowayfilms@yahoo.com.

Media Type: Media

African Immigration: Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because It is part of a larger body of research entitled, In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience, this website provides a wealth of information, both quantitative and analytical, about recent African immigration to the U.S. The site provides an overview and statistics, as well as discussion of such issues as the Brain Drain, entrepreneurship, continuity and change in family life, religious communities, questions of identity and dual identity. The site also provides excellent images, maps, and other links, as well as lesson plans for the K12 level.

Africans in America

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its dialogue with immigrant mothers and daughters from five African countries. Rahina Awini, an immigrant from Ghana, says, “American schools were difficult& a lot of White kids. They treated us bad. They didn”t treat us equally at all. When we were growing up in Ghana we were used to being treated equally. They didn’t accept us. It was because of our skin color.” Meet Rahina and twelve additional African immigrants living in the United States. They represent two generations of five families from five African countries: Ethiopia, Ghana, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda. See and hear them describe their acculturative stressors, coping mechanisms, identity development, and hopes for the future. The instructor’s manual includes maps and country of origin, demographic material, photographs of the participants, quotations from each participant, as well as discussion questions and reference material. This program is available for purchase for educational use from Films for the Humanities and Sciences. Please visit the company website at http://www.films.com or call toll free the customer service number at 1-800-257-5126.

Media Type: Media

Beyond the Fire: Teen Experiences of War

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this outstanding website gives students the opportunity to examine the impact of conflicts throughout the world, with focus on such African countries as Somalia, Sudan, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. In addition to the audio interviews with teenage refugees now living in the US, the site provides well-developed lesson plans for classrooms to develop understanding and empathy on teenage refugees, child soldiers, and other issues. Students can click on individual students’ stories, follow a time line, and read background articles on various conflicts.

Cultural Orientation Resource Center

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Recommended because this Center, part of the Georgetown University-affiliated Center for Applied Linguistics, provides cultural profiles and other cross-cultural materials for a variety of immigrant groups, including Liberian, Somali, Somali-Bantu, and Sudanese. The materials are for use by refugee resettlement workers, both overseas and in the U.S., who are assisting in the resettlement of refugees to the U.S. The site also provides materials that describe and explain the refugee resettlement process, and exercises to explore cultural identity, workplace norms, family roles, and other issues affecting refugees.

Ethiopian Community Development Council

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Recommended because the Ethiopian Community Development Council is a non-profit providing resettlement services primarily to African refugees in the Washington DC metropolitan area as well as elsewhere in the U.S. Publishes newsletters Cultural Bridges and African Refugee Network.

Ethiopian Community Television

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Recommended because it is broadcast out of the Washington DC metropolitan area, home to the largest Ethiopian community in the U.S. The station’s web site features images and news concerning both local and international events of interest to the community.

Ethomed

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Recommended because it contains information about cultural beliefs and medically-related issues pertinent to the health care of recent immigrants to Seattle, most of whom are refugees fleeing war-torn parts of the world. Contains medically-focused profiles for Somali, Ethiopian, Eritrean, Tigrinian, and Oromo ethnic groups.

Extended Lives: the African immigrant experience in Philadelphia

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Recommended because this exhibit, part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, explores many aspects of the new African immigrants living in our midst. In the last two decades, there has been a surge in immigration from Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite their differences with one another, these immigrants have many common experiences. Although they have left their home countries, they have not lost contact. Instead, most find that their lives become extended in various ways, so that they remain emotionally, politically, spiritually, and financially invested in their home countries, even as they create new lives in the U.S. The exhibit is the result of two years of fieldwork by oral historians and others, and is available for travel. It includes sections on extended families, extending communities, extending occupations, the refugee experience, religious life, including many quotations, stories, and pictures from African community members.

Hiiraan Online

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Recommended because it is a popular website for the North American Somali community for national and international news, views, and resources. Be aware of the fact that much of the website is in Somali.

International Rescue Committee

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Recommended because the International Rescue Committee works internationally as a relief and development agency, helping refugees and others, as well as a U.S.-based voluntary agency managing the resettlement of refugees.

Lost Boys of Sudan: A Documentary Film

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Lost Boys of Sudan is a feature-length documentary that follows two Sudanese refugees on an extraordinary journey from Africa to America. Lost Boys of Sudan won an Independent Spirit Award and screened theatrically in 70 cities across the U.S. to strong audience and critical praise. While providing background on the civil war and other events in Southern Sudan which led to the boys’ displacement, the main focus of the film is on their resettlement experience in the U.S. Their experiences in high school, entry-level jobs, and learning to drive, as well as their interactions with landlords, police, social workers, and their American peers are juxaposed with their concerns and anxieties about lost country, culture, and loved ones. Start by going to
lostboysfilm.com
to learn more about the film.

Media Type: Media

Migration Policy Institute

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a non-profit, non-partisan think tank dedicated to the study of the movement of people worldwide. It contains articles, news, and data on migration trends, US immigration, immigrant integration, country profiles, and refugee protection. In the tools section, you can glean statistics and maps on different African (or other) immigrant groups in different geographic areas. Start by going to MPI’s newsletter article on African Foreign Born in the US at:http://www.migrationinformation.org/USfocus/display.cfm?id=250 , which provides excellent overview information. Be aware, however, that statistics are based largely on official census figures, and may therefore have limitations inherent to accurately tracking minority or marginalized communities.

Nigerians in America

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Recommended because NIA is a small web space trying to maturely express the Nigerian worldview from the perspective of Nigerians In America.

Peppercorn Books

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Recommended because this publishing company has developed a particular niche in providing books on Africa, and particularly Somalia and other East African countries. Peppercorn’s core collection includes over 1,000 titles. They include a strong collection of readers written for new adult readers and other books for adult learners and their teachers. The publisher imports books published in Africa, in both English and African languages. Start by going to the links on the left for Africa or African languages.

Recontrer

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is an Eritrean-American film maker’s perspectives on African immigrants’ experiences in America. Mr. Mebrahtu’s film Rencontrer (To Meet) consists of six segments, each focusing on a different individual. With only the natural background sound and no musical embellishments, we see them – usually dressed in their traditional African garb – getting on a city bus, tending a garden, visiting friends in a hair-braiding salon, kneeling on a mat in their dining room to pray. As they go about the business of their daily lives, they talk about everyday things – their children, their frustrations with local bureaucracy, their attempts to recreate a bit of their African homeland on American soil – even if it’s only a garden growing peppers and collard greens.

Media Type: Media

Rwanda & genocide issues

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this website, designed by the Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, provides background and lesson plans, suitable for middle or high school students, on the Rwandan genocide and related issues.

Somali Family Care Network

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Recommended because it is a good example of a non-profit refugee service organization which works in collaboration with the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement to provide services to African refugees in the Washington DC metropolitan area. SFCN aims to act as a national resource for the growing Somali community as well as for the refugee and mainstream service providers who interface with Somali communities in the U.S. Additionally, SFCN acts as a technical assistance organization, providing training to strengthen institution building, resource development, and leadership development.

Somalis in Minnesota Profile

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Recommended because this study of immigration in Minnesota, produced by the Minnesota foundation, takes a specific look at Somali immigration into the state. The study looks at experiences the difficulties of adjusting to life in a new country-language barriers, culture shock, a sense of loss, and isolation.

The Cross-Cultural Health Care Program

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Recommended because this Seattle-based health care non-profit has been addressing broad cultural issues that impact the health of individuals and families in ethnic minority communities in Seattle and nationwide since 1992. Through a combination of cultural competency trainings, research projects, community coalition providing cultural profiles, interpreter resources, and other materials for immigrant groups including Somali, Ethiopian, and others.

The Letter: An American Town and the “Somali Invasion”

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a riveting documentary of the Somali migration to Lewiston, Maine and the reactions, both positive and negative, to the new residents, which culminated in simultaneous rallies of white supremacists and those opposed to them. In the wake of the 9/11 tragedy a firestorm erupts when Mayor Larry Raymond of Lewiston, Maine sends a letter to 1,100 newly arrived Somali refugees advising that the city’s resources are strained to the limit and asking that other Somalis not to move to the city. Interpreted as racism by some and a rallying cry by white supremacist groups across the United States, THE LETTER documents the crossfire of emotions and events, culminating in a “hate” rally convened by The World Church of the Creator and a counter “peace” rally involving 4,000 Lewiston residents supporting ethnic and cultural diversity. Start by Visiting the filmaker’s website to read reviews and learn how to access the film.

Media Type: Media

UNHCR Liberians arriving in 2005

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this short article from the UNHCR website describes Liberian refugees taking their first steps towards new life in US.

Voices of New York

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Recommended because this unique study came out of a course entitled The Language of America’s Ethnic Minorities which took place through the New York University Morse Academic Plan in 2001. Students traveled throughout the city to seek out neighborhoods where 34 separate ethnic cultures were thought to be flourishing. There, they discovered the degree to which the distinct language groups are being maintained or lost, and the implications for cultural distinctiveness or assimilation. Ethiopian and Senegalese case studies provide insights based on first-hand interviews into the complexities of linguistic preservation and adaptation.

Wonders of the African World

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, March 22, 2005

Recommended because this website explores the great African civilizations of Nubia, the Great Zimbabwe, Timbuktu, Ethiopia, the Swahili Coast, and the Kingdoms of Dahomey and the Ashanti. The website was constructed by Henry Louis Gates, a Harvard historian, to parallel his PBS/BBC video series exploring these themes. The site works to illuminate the achievements of Africans in these civilizations, and to debunk earlier historical bias or oversight of them. Gates examines this history and the questions it raises from an African-American perspective, in such sections as What Africa Means to Me . Start by reading through the home page and the Wonders page to get a general overview and click on the site map of Africa. Specific to Ghana, go to the Slave Kingdoms . Be sure to visit the sections for kids and classroom for lesson plans.