Results Filter:

  • Websites
  • Books
  • Media

1 stop Korea (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of English-speaking foreigner’s perspectives on Korea and Korean culture. As native people sometimes don’t know what they are and what their culture, it will be helpful for you to understand Korea and Korean culture through the eyes of foreigners. Topics and materials included in this site are information about cooking, expats, regions, jobs, Korean language, Korean pop, TESOL, travel, and writings. Start by “cooking” and “general Korean food info” and “recipes”. After that try to understand Korean culture through their foods. Be aware of the fact that this site offers Soul maps to get a sense of what can be seen there. This resource was written by East Asian Studies Center Indiana University.

300 Hundred Tang Poems (2000)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its new translations of poems from the Tang Dynasty, the golden age of poetry in China. Be aware of the fact that this is a bilingual edition. Recommended for high school.

Citation: Herdan, Innes Taibei Shi, Yuan dong tu shu gong si ($29.99)

Media Type: Book

A is for Asia (1997)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this book introduces Asian products, cultures, and festivals in an alphabetical order. This book would be good for low elementary school students. Topics and materials included in this book are a brief description or explanation on the introduced products, cultures, and festivals, and their names in original languages.

Citation: Chin-lee, C. New York: Orchard Books ($5.95)

Media Type: Book

A Life Like Mine

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, March 3, 2010

A Life Like Mine tells the story of how children live around the world through four themes:  survival, development, protection, participation.  Excellent images and text suitable for upper elementary and middle school students. Truly has a global perspective. Includes many visuals and maps.

Is is published by UNICEF.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

A reevaluation of the uniqueness of Japanese written discourse: Implication for contrastive rhetoric (1997)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this article challenges the features of Japanese written discourse found in contrastive rhetoric research such as a classical style (ki-sho-ten-ketsu), reader responsibility, and an inductive style with a sudden topic shift. The topics and materials included in this site are Hinds’s studies on the Japanese written language, language and culture, overgeneralization, multiple interpretations of ki-sho-ten-ketsu, and contemporary written Japanese.I would use this article to make students realize that there is a diversity of Japanese writing styles and there are similarities and differences between Japanese writing styles and western writing styles.

Citation: Kubota, Ryoko TESOL Quarterly, 33 (1), 9-35.

Media Type: Book

A Sampler of Chinese Literature from the Ming Dynasty to Mao Zedong (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is a fine collection of China

Citation: Shapiro, S. (Editor and Translator). 324 pp. ($16.95)

Media Type: Book

A Single Shard (2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this novel for young people, Winner of the 2002 Newberry Medal, is set in Medieval Korea. It is the story of Tree-Ear, an orphan who apprentices himself to a master potter. His adventures on a journey to enter his master’s wares in the competition for a royal commission takes him over hazardous terrain. This is historical fiction at its best. Recommended for upper elementary and middle school. Reviewed from Columbus Dispatch dated April 25, 2002. F8. Surprise prize by Nancy Gilson.

Citation: Park, L.S. Clarion Books. [ISBN 03978720] 160 pp. ($11.60)

Media Type: Book

A Taste of China (1984) Sue Yung Li. Masters of the Wok (VHS, 29 minutes, English)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because the series, which won the National Educational Film Festival Gold Apple Award and a CINE Golden Eagle Award, features food but speaks also to the influences of geography and food supplies on China’s culture and development. Masters of the Wok introduces Chinese cuisine from peasant fare to highly refined imperial cooking. It opens with engaging scenes of master chefs at work in their kitchens, then moves to Confucius’ birthplace to illustrate robust peasant cooking, visits a cooking academy in Sichuan province, and concludes with an elegant banquet. Recommended for middle/second/post secondary. Reviewed from the East Asia Program Resource Lending Library Catalog of Cornell University.

Media Type: Media

A Taste of China (1984) Sue Yung Li. Masters of the Wok (VHS, 29 minutes, English)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because “The series, which won the National Educational Film Festival Gold Apple Award and a CINE Golden Eagle Award, features food but speaks also to the influences of geography and food supplies on China’s culture and development. Masters of the Wok introduces Chinese cuisine from peasant fare to highly refined imperial cooking. It opens with engaging scenes of master chefs at work in their kitchens, then moves to Confucius’ birthplace to illustrate robust peasant cooking, visits a cooking academy in Sichuan province, and concludes with an elegant banquet.” Recommended for middle/second/post secondary.
Reviewed from the East Asia Program Resource Lending Library Catalog of Cornell University.

Media Type: Media

A Taxing Woman (1987)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this movie is a Japanese comedy whose heroine is Ryoko, Tokyo’s hardest working female tax inspector. The ruthless diligence of this innocent-looking woman is matched only by the intricate deceptions of Gondo, tax cheat extraordinaire. Ryoko discovers that Gondo owns one of Tokyo’s busiest “love hotels” and tries to audit him, but is thwarted by his hilarious evasive maneuvers. Recommended for Grades 13-16+.
Reviewed by University Center for International Studies (UCIS) of University of Pittsburgh.

Media Type: Media

A Thousand Peaks: Poems From China (2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because the poems for young readers that span 19 centuries and are accessible to children. The poems were chosen for their ability to provide insight into some aspect of Chinese history and culture. Recommended for intermediate and up.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy 3/28/02.
Available for $10.95 from Asia for Kids, http://www.afk.com

Citation: Liu, Siyu & Protopopescu, Orel Berkeley, California: Pacific View Press ($19.95)

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

A Treasury of Turkish Folktales for Children (1988)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this book contains the retelling of many Turkish folktale classics. The thirty-four stories contained in this book are excellent for elementary and middle school teachers to use in a World literature or World cultures curriculum unit. Perfect for story time or for classroom reading practice. Reviewed by Jennifer Nichols, 05/2002.

Citation: Walker, Barbara.

Media Type: Book

ABC of Modern Japanese History (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides information about controversial modern Japanese history from an unique perspective. This site would be good for high school students to learn about Japanese historical controversial topics such as Nanking massacre, Japan-Korean relation, and history book issues. Topics and materials included in this site are readings and excerpts from newspapers and books on controversial issues of Japan, and other useful sites for further information. Start by “At the Frontlines.” It provides readings about contemporary issues. Especially it is recommended to use an article “The Meaning of Nationalism in Japan today” discussing resurgence of Japanese militarism. Be aware of the contents, which may be inappropriate for lower grade students because of controversial issues. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Along the Silk Road

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because world history, geography, and world culture classes will benefit from this unit’s treatment of the rich and colorful history and geography of the Silk Road. Recommended for engaging small group activities, which draw on many primary sources, will allow students to explore these historic routes through the lives of people who have lived and traveled these pathways from early days to the present. An adaptation of the simulation Heelotia is included. Recommended for middle school, high school.
Reviewed from SPICE website includes connections to curriculum standards.

Citation: http://spice.stanford.edu

Media Type: Book

American Go Association

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site contains the rules of the ancient Chinese board game Go. “Beyond being merely a game, Go can take on other meanings to enthusiasts: an analogy with life, an intense meditation, a mirror of one’s personality, an exercise in abstract reasoning, or, when played well, a beautiful art in which Black and White dance across the board in delicate balance.” A fascinating glimpse into Chinese philosophy and culture for centuries. Recommended for high school. Start byWhat is the game of Go?” as it presents a rule of Go. Be aware of the fact that you can download a software that you can play Go against the computer here. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy 5/03/02.

Annyoung haseyo hananim (Hello, God)(1987, 110 min)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Byeong-Tae, who suffers from cerebral palsy, comes to the station office by mistake. He meets Min-Wu, who is caught on charge of a free ride and Chun-Ja, who tried to kill herself. Chun-Ja steals the purse of Byeong-Tae and causes trouble. The pregnant Chun-Ja gives birth to a baby in a barn of farmer, and she marries Min-Wu in a church. They arrive to the Chun-Ja’s hometown, but Byeong-Tae separates from them in order to go to Kyeong-Ju. He returns home after traveling Kyeong-Ju. Reviewed by Korea film organization http://www.koreafilm.or.kr/english/index.asp.

Media Type: Media

Anrumdaun sijol (Beautiful days) (1998, 113 min.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because (Synopsis) It is the summer of 1952, the middle of the Korean War. Sungmin and Changhee are best friends. They witness a terrible secret better left undiscovered at a deserted mill : Changhee’s mother greets a G.I and Sungmin’s father stands guard as her pimp. Changhee determines to seek revenge. The next day, Changhee disappears without even a word to Sungmin after setting fire to the mill where a G.I and a Korean prostitute make love. A year later, a terrible thing happens in the village. Reviewed by Korea film organization. http://www.koreafilm.or.kr/english/index.asp.

Media Type: Media

Asahi Shinbun Newspaper (Michigan)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site offers up-to-date information about Japan and Japanese culture. This site would be good for junior and high school students. The topics and materials included in this site are newspaper articles about national, politics, international, business, sports, culture, opinion, editorial, and Vox Populi, Vox Dei (Tensei Jingo). Start by “Vox Populi, Vox Dei (Tensei Jingo)”. This section provides daily columns translated in English, which are popular for Japanese people. Be aware of the translated column, which is usually posted in this site two days after the original column in Japanese. This resource was originally recommended by the Centers for Chinese, Japanese, & Korean Studies at University of Michigan.

Asia for Kids

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because Asia for Kids is a commercial site for teaching resources on East Asia. Topics and materials included in this site are Big Bird in China, a musical video of the popular Sesame Street character’s trip to China which features interactions with Chinese children. Start by search option to find the materials that you are looking for. The search can be done by product name, author, subjects, countries, and language. Recommended for all ages. Can be ordered for $14.50 from Asia for Kids.

Asia Source

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is an online resource developed by the Asia Society to meet the need for timely, reliable, unbiased information and assistance regarding the cultural, economic, social, historical, and political dimensions of Asia. With a worldwide events calendar, a glossary of terms, annotated links and opinion pieces, news services, country profiles, special features, and much more. Reviewed by East Asia WWW Virtual Library. Start byAsia Profiles” since it provides maps and statistics for individual East Asian countries. Be aware of the fact that “Resources” in this site offer basic information about Asia such as Asian Holidays, Chronologies, Country Comparison, Embassies, Government Directory, and Regional News.

Asia Video Reports – Japan (2000)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this video report was designed by this module having students analyze Japanese culture by looking at Japanese food, housing, arts, and festivals. Grades: Slavic and Eastern Europe-12. Module themes include: tradition and change, daily life as a reflection of cultural values, and transmission of culture from generation to generation. Report includes a 1Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute videotape of four-to-five short video segments on a topic, plus an accompanying teacher’s guide with readings, lesson plans, classroom activities, and Internet resources. Videos include:
Asia Video Reports Food
Asia Video Reports Housing
Asia Video Reports Arts and Crafts
Asia Video Reports Festivals
Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) (University of Illinois)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because AEMS offers help in locating audio-visual media resources about Asia and advice in choosing the many resources available. Curriculum materials are also available. You can search by subject, by country, or by region. Reviews are available for many of the resources listed. Start by “Guide to Using Educational Video” as this page presents information about how to find and use educational films. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 4/15/02; updated by Masataka Kasai, 7/17/03.

Asian Film Connections (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because Recommended as this site attempts to give exposure to Asian films, encourage joint ventures, and provide new educational resources. Topics and materials included in this site are a list of all films made in China, India, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan, including basic information such as synopses, filmmakers, cast, length, format, and availability of prints, eight to fifteen highlighted films and directors from each country, with detailed information and video clips, a list of all internationally awarded films of each country from 1988 on Reviews, essays, interviews and filmographies, plus reprints from Asia’s leading film journals, such as Cinemaya, press kits and contact information, and links to other relevant websites.
This resource was originally recommended by the Asian Studies Network Information Center at University of Texas.

AsianNet (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides opportunities to share ideas and resources to teach about Asia. This site would be good for K-12 teachers interested in teaching about Asian countries. Topics and materials included in this site are discussion group, noticeboard, website directory, and Asia EdNet Tutorial. Start by any country to obtain information about products that the country manufactured. Be aware of the fact that information is also organized by themes such as agriculture, business and economics, and chemicals. This resource was originally recommended by the Asian Studies Network Information Center at University of Texas.

Ask Asia: Japan (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site includes variety of readings related to Japan and Japanese culture, and these articles are written by experts of Japan including Japanese writers. Topics and materials included in this site are lesson plans, readings on Japanese culture such as arranged marriage, high school students in Japan, and the Japanese family, maps of Japan, photos and drawings related to Japanese culture, and a brief timeline of Japanese history. Start by “readings”. Articles on various topics of Japan and Japanese culture are provided. Be aware of this site providing information of the same topics in other Asian countries such as China and North and South Korea, and a browser of related links to facilitate searching for other websites. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Ask Asia: Korea (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site attempts to increasing American understanding of Asia and broadening the dialogue between Americans and Asians. Topics and materials included in this site are lesson plans about Korea and Korean culture, readings about various aspects of Korea including bamboo, farmers’ dance, Korean thought, or values and meaning in the Korean family, maps of Korea, photos related to Korean culture. Start by “Korea in your community” since it presents a lesson plan to teach about how Korea is connected to the world. Be aware of the fact that this site is a part of AskAsia offering numerous teaching and learning materials about Asia. This resource was written by East Asian Studies Center Indiana University.

Becoming Madame Mao (2000)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is a novel that portrays the life and fortunes of Jiang Qing, Mao’s wife. It traces her early childhood, her unsuccessful attempts at an acting career, her courtship with MaoZedong, and her fall from grace as a member of the notorious Gang of Four. Recommended for high school teachers. Reviewed from China Dushkin Global Studies series.

Citation: Min, Anchee Boston: Houghton Mifflin. ($13.00)

Media Type: Book

Before the Dawn (1987)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because historical novel set in the second half of the 19th century, It spans the close of the Edo period and the first few decades of the Meiji period. Chronicling the lives of the family and friends of a village headman and toiya along a national highway after the coming of Perry’s black ships, it also offers oblique political commentary of the Tokugawa bakufu in the decade preceding the Meiji Restoration and the period immediately following.
Reviewed by East Asian Studies Center Indiana University.

Citation: Shimazaki, Toson. Translated by William E. Naff. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. $32.95.

Media Type: Book

Blood Red Sunset (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its autobiographical account by a Red Guard during the Cultural Revolution. High school, teachers. Reviewed from Japan and the Pacific Rim, Dushkin Global Studies series.

Citation: Bo, Ma New York: Viking ($42.75)

Media Type: Book

Books of South Asian Writers

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides bibliographies of South Asian writers writing in English, South Asian writers in translation, books on South Asia, South Asian women’s literature, and South Asian children’s literature, with a few hotlinks to other resources. Start byGeneral Books From South Asian Writers” as it provides a list of books written by authors from South Asia (e.g., Mahatma Gandhi). Be aware of the fact that this site was updated on 21 May 1999.

Breakup of the Soviet Union Teacher

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Designed for the high school level. This teachers guide is recommended because it examines the events and causes of the collapse of the Soviet Union. Includes student activities, handouts, and test materials. Reviewed by and available from the Indiana University Russian and East European Institute.

Citation: Tiffany Farrell Larbalestier and Charles R. Sass, Close Up Foundation (1999)

Media Type: Book

Britannica.com

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this on-line encyclopedia has entries for the Ch’ing dynasty (Qing), the Ming Dynasty (Ming), Cheng Ho (Zheng He)–the Ming dynasty navigator, and more. Bolded names here indicate the preferred search terms as the encyclopedia uses Wade Giles romanization for Chinese names and terms. Start by “Biography of the Day” as it provides a brief introduction of world events occurred on this day. Be aware of the fact that you need to register to view full Britannica articles and 72 hours of free access is available here.
Reviewed from China: A Teaching Workbook. http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/mainframe.htm/ (not working); updated by Masataka Kasai, 7/08/03.

Brochures from the Chinese Information and Culture Center (1992)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because color pictures and illustrations populate these brochures about Chinese culture, which also provide informative summaries on a number of topics. Topics include architecture, Chinese painting, dance, opera, music, tea drinking, Chinese festivals, Kung Fu, philosophical thought, among others. Free to educators.

Citation: Kwang Hwa Publishing Co.

Media Type: Book

Bugs Music (written in Korean)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site written in Korean gives you a great chance of listening a variety of Korean contemporary pop songs for free. As music is a good representative of culture, you might feel empathy with Korean people. Topics and materials included in this site are contemporary pop songs in Korea, in the United States, and in Japan. And it also contains some O.S.T music and other entertainment materials. Start by 1) On the front page of this site, you can click the icon just next to the “headphone icon and LOGIN”. This Korean letter means that you can get into this site as a guest. 2) On the top of the next page, you can see “Bugs Music,” “home”, and a cute icon with headphone. Are you following? (It’s not easy for me to guide you because of the language barrier. How about learning Korean? There is a web site in this WebCt page.) Next to this cute icon, you can find hyperlinks on which your cursor will turn into the hand-shape. The first two letter means Korean pop music. Please, click this. 3) On this page you can see English letter written as
“Top 100″

Cabinet Office Japan/Government of Japan (Cornell)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because its concise policy information and data about policies in various fields such as Economics, Gender Equality, Science and Technology, Quality of Life, or International peace corporation. This site would be good for high school students. The topics and materials included in this site are White paper, report, National plan of action about policy topics. Start by Gender Equality.” It provides information, report, and data about definition of “gender-equal society,” policies to create a gender-equal society, current status of Japanese women. As official documents in “Gender Equality” may be difficult for students, teachers may want to present “What’s gender-equal society?” and “Activities of the Government for realizing a gender-equal society” since these two sections provide basic concept of a gender-equal society and activities to create such a society, and are materials relatively easy to read. Reviewed by Masataka Kasai, 3/18/02.

Calling Tokyo (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) $75

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because despite their own, their family’s, and their friends’ internment during World War II, a small number of Japanese Americans played a crucial and secret role in the American war effort against Japan by serving as hosts of Japanese-language radio propaganda shows that were broadcast by the U.S. Office of War Information and the British Political Warfare Mission via short wave to Japan. This engaging historical documentary unveils for the first time these Japanese-Americans’ vital but unheralded contributions to the Allied cause. Occasioned by the mystery of what the filmmaker’s now-deceased father had done during the war and his family’s internment, the film combines archival footage, commentary by remaining participants, and detailed historical recreations to recount this remarkable but virtually unknown chapter of the war. “Calling Tokyo” will spur discussion in a variety of courses in Japanese-American and Asian-American studies, American history, and ethnic studies. It was produced by Gary T. Ono. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Calliope (Exploring World History) on Chinese History

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because Cobblestone Publishing Company produces a magazine (Calliope) in its Exploring World History series that focuses on particular periods or themes of Chinese history. Individual issues are reviewed below. They are available for $4.95 each from Cobblestone Publishing Company, 30 Grove Street, Suite C, Petersborough, NH 03458. Visit their website for complete ordering information.
Reviewed from China: A Teaching Workbook. http://www.afe.easia.columbia.edu/mainframe.html (not working)

Calliope: Confucius and Confucianism (Exploring World History)
The October 1999 issue is devoted to Confucius and Confucianism. It features articles on Confucius personal life, his name, the Chinese classics, the influence of Confucian teaching on Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, and the origin of fortunes in fortune cookies. Not only informative, this magazine is full of stimulating visuals accompanying each short article. Volume 10, Number 2, ISBN 0382445120

Calliope: China’s First Emperor: Shi-Huangdi (Exploring World History)
The October 1997 issue of Calliope magazine is devoted to China’s First Emperor: Shi-Huangdi. It features articles on topics and personalities of the period. Not only informative, this magazine is full of stimulating visuals accompanying each short article. October 1997Volume 8, Number 2, ISBN 0382408942

Calliope: Han Dynasty of China (Exploring World History)
The October 1998 issue of Calliope magazine covers the Han Dynasty of China. It features articles on Sima Qian, Liu Bang, The Emperor Wu Di, The Golden Age of Technology and the Arts, and much more. Not only informative, this magazine is full of stimulating visuals accompanying each short article. October 1998Volume 9, Number 2, ISBN 0382443896

Calliope: Lost Cities (Exploring World History)
The May/June 1991 issue includes an article on Loyang (Luoyang), ancient capital of China under the later Han dynasty. The article is entitled, “Loyang: The Emperor’s City in China.” Volume 1, Number 5, ISBN 0382405838

Calliope: The Hunnic Invasions (Exploring World History)
The September/October 1991 issue includes an article on “The Xiongnu Breach the Great Wall of China,” discussing the role played by the invasions of these tribes from the north in Chinese history. Volume 2, Number 1, ISBN 0382405889

Calliope: Buddhism (Exploring World History)
The March/April 1995 issue is devoted to Buddhism and includes articles on the historical Buddha, the basic teachings of Buddhism, the early development of Buddhism, the life of a Buddhist monk, and the Dalai Lama. Although not specifically focused on Buddhism as practiced in any one country, this issue provides an excellent introduction to the religion. Not only informative, this magazine is full of stimulating visuals accompanying each short article. Volume 5, Number 4, ISBN 0382445120

Calliope: Cities of the Past (Exploring World History)
The May/June 1996 issue includes an article on “China’s Ancient Capital: Xian.” Xian, known historically as “Changan,” was the capital of China during the Qin, Han, and Tang dynasties, as a cosmopolitan city that was the western terminus of the Silk Road. Volume 6, Number 5, ISBN 0382445120

Calliope: The Mongols (Exploring World History)
The November/December 1993 issue focuses on the Mongols, their leaders, their role in world history as conquerors and rules of China and vast areas of the Eurasian continent. Volume 4, Number 2, ISBN 0382405994

Calliope: Great Explorers to the East (Exploring World History)
The September/October 1990 issue includes an article on Marco Polo and his travels to China, “Marco Polo: Describing the World.” Volume 1, Number 1, ISBN 0382405838

Calliope: The Ming Dynasty: The World of the Yongle Emperor (Exploring World History)
The May/June 1995 issue of Calliope magazine is titled The Ming Dynasty: The World of the Yongle Emperor. It features articles on Zhu Di, Zheng He, The Forbidden City, and much more. Not only informative, this magazine is full of stimulating visuals accompanying each short article. May/June 1995Volume 5, Number 5

Ancient China: Theme Pack from Calliope (Exploring World History)
Five issues are conveniently grouped in one boxed set with an excellent teacher’s guide. The issues included are Confucius and Confucianism, China’s First Emperor: Shi Huangdi, The Han Dynasty, The Mongols, and The Ming Dynasty: The World of the Yongle Emperor. (See above for annotation of individual issues.)
Price: $25.95

Citation: http://www.cobblestonepub.com

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

Cambodian Auto-Genocide Page (Iowa)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because as this site attempts to preserve and protect the memories of Cambodian holocaust survivors of Angkar. Topics and materials included in this site are pictures of and information about Cambodia today, Cambodian killing fields, Cambodian genocide justice act, and survivors stories. Start bySurvivors Stories” since it provides survivors’ stories on what happened to Cambodia from 1975 to 1979. Be aware of the fact that “Cambodian Killing Fields” includes some photos not appropriate for young students. This resource was originally recommended by the Center for Asian Pacific Studies at University of Iowa.

Celebrate Child

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site, set up to serve the needs of people adopting foreign babies, sells videos (and other useful materials such as books, music, and kits) suitable for younger children on Asians and Asian-Americans. The China area is the strongest. Be aware of the fact that this site offers some resources about Latin America and Russia. Reviewed from http://www.aems.uiuc.edu/HTML/WebResources.html

Changing Lifestyles (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) $129.95 per video

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because from busy, overcrowded cities to the bucolic remoteness of the countryside, the lives of average Japanese people vary greatly. Japan 2000 concludes with a look at these different lifestyles. A typical, expensive high-rise apartment is compared with projects designed to provide cheaper housing and relieve city overcrowding. A young family on a remote island discusses the advantages and disadvantages of their chosen lifestyle. A young woman compares her lifestyle with that of her more traditional parents. 2003; English. Color. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Cheng and Tsui Company

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this Boston Company offers an online catalog of books, videos and computer software on East Asia. They specialize in Chinese language instruction materials. Most items in the online catalog have complete descriptions making the catalog very user friendly. Recommended for all ages. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/03/02

Children of the Secret State: North Korea (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) VHS- $129.95; DVD- $139.95

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this revealing documentary contains clandestine video footage shot at great personal risk by a North Korean known as Ahn Chol and by journalists posing as tourists. Through interviews with street children, refugees, and former prisoners, this program explores the plight of youth in the last remaining Stalinist dictatorship and perhaps the most secretive state on the planet. From Pyongyang, to the China/North Korea border, to South Korea, to the infamous prison camps, the cameras expose the truth behind the wall of secrecy that hides a record of 3 million reported starvation deaths in the last decade and hundreds of thousands of children with nowhere to call home. Some content may be objectionable. A Discovery Channel Production. (46 minutes, color)
This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Chilsu and Mansu/ Park Kwang-Soo (1988, 108 min.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because (Synopsis) Chil-Su, who comes from Dongducheo, is talented with a painting. He is waiting for the invitation of his sister in America, but he quits his job as a painter in a theater. He works as an assistant for Man-Su who suffers from his father, who is serving his sentence. The college student Ji-Na leaves Chil-Su behind and his sister in America do not make contact with him any more. One night Chil-Su and Man-Su, who are in despair, finish working of signboard and then do mischief on an advertising tower. In this moment, the police arrive there, because they consider that they are going to commit suicide. Finally, Man-Su falls down and Chil-Su is arrested by the police. Reviewed by Korea film organization. http://www.koreafilm.or.kr/english/index.asp.

Media Type: Media

China and the World in 2010: An Introduction to Futures Studies (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because in this unit, students are given the opportunity to explore futures studies by examining common research tools that futurists use. Through small group activities, students will become familiar with these tools as they apply to China, and will be able to extend their use from the focus on China to almost any content area. Recommended for high school.

Citation: http://spice.stanford.edu/ldml/viewpub_sp.lasso?id=10022

Media Type: Book

China Books and Periodicals

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site offers on-line catalog of books, periodicals, software and other items on China and Chinese culture. Good source of bilingual children’s books. Need to send for catalog to get a description of the books. From the Columbia East Asia site. Be aware that a free catalogue of the materials on China can be requested or you can download it For Teachers” since this presents some tips to explor this website effectively. Be aware of the fact that a free catalogue of the materials on China can be requested or you can download it here.

China Internet Information Center

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides links to news on Chinese domestic and foreign affairs, government white papers, and other information related to contemporary China. It is sponsored by China International Publishing and Internet Group, which has various media institutions and sister organizations throughout China. Start byLife” as it provides recent news about daily lives of Chinese people. Be aware of the fact that the china.org.cn site is available in various languages such as Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Arabic, and Esperanto. Reviewed from http://afe.easia.columbia.edu

China Kaleidoscope (UCLA, Mandarin with English subtitles)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its look at Chinese life from a Chinese perspective. This series was put together by Nan Hai Arts Center from Chinese television news magazine shows. It provides an opportunity to get a Chinese perspective on Chinese life. There are four tapes available, each 50 minutes long. Contact Nan Hai for a detailed list of subjects on the various tapes. For example, Tape 1 includes Beijing’s Markets, The Water Shortage in Xi’an, Life in a Chinese Village, the Li Yuan Theater in Beijing, China’s Pop Stars Go On Tour, Fashion in Beijing, Women Police Officers in Training, and more. The tapes are in mandarin with English subtitles. There are four tapes at 34.95 each or the entire set for $125.82. Reviewed from the UCLA Center for East Asian Studies Educational Films on China. For more, check this URL: http://www.isop.ucla.edu/eas/web/asiafilm-web.htm

Media Type: Media

China Mosaic (1988) (1990 printing)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this includes a free collection of activities for middle-school students on the Qin (Ch’in) dynasty, Confucius, the Tale of Monkey, the Chinese language, society, agriculture, the political system, and shadow puppets. It was produced by teachers in the state of Washington and edited by Mary Hammond Bernson of the University of Washington in conjunction with the State Education Department.
Reviewed from http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/

Citation: Mary Hammond Bernson. Olympia, WA : Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Media Type: Book

China Page Parable/Story

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is a treasure trove of parables/stories from classical Chinese literature. Included are Confucius, Mencius, LieZe, among others. There are stories suitable for all levels. Start by any parable or story that students are interested in or you want to introduce to your students. Be aware of the fact that this site also offers Chinese text version. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 4/17/02.

China the Beautiful

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides audiovisual and map resources. Start by “About ‘China the Beautiful’ and then to China Room. Excellent map section including satellite photos, historical maps, a map of China superimposed on the U.S. Hear poetry read in Chinese. Has on-line Chinese flash cards with pronunciation, parables in English and Chinese, artwork, calligraphy, poetry, classics, novels, science, philosophy / religion, history culture, language, theater / opera, descriptions of holiday, slides. Be aware of the fact that this site is a mega site offering numerous information and materials. Thus, it is recommended for teachers to have particular topic to search before exploring this site. Recommended for high school and middle school.

China the Beautiful: Classical Chinese Novels

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site contains translations in English of several classic Chinese novels, such as Dream of the Red Chamber. It also links you to other sites related to the novels. Some of the novels could be read by advanced high school students. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 4/17/02.

China the Beautiful: Poetry Readings

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because one of the poems, Wang Wei, has several translations in English which give a fascinating glimpse into the difficulties of translation. This site has poetry readings in Chinese. Be aware of the fact that you can hear a recitation of the poem when clicking the poem. Recommended for high school.

China through Mapping (2003) Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) $24.95

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because in this lesson, Mimi Norton integrates world geography with the study of Chinese culture and history by engaging her young students in a variety of activities to locate natural and human-made landmarks on maps of China. To build background for this lesson, she has had the students create salt-dough maps of China and label them with map symbols. Ms. Norton begins the lesson by reviewing map symbols with students and having them use the symbols to locate important natural and human-made land forms on desk maps. Then the class sings a song about the continents and oceans and locates them on a floor map. Ms. Norton explains that they will use what they are learning about scale in math class to enlarge a small map of China to room size. To do this, Ms. Norton first draws a large grid on the floor. Then she hands out cards, each representing a small section of China. Students then copy the information on their card to the corresponding square on the floor grid. The result is a large floor map of China. After the map has been drawn, students label the natural and human-made features at the correct locations on the map. Ms. Norton reads a story about a fictitious traveler in China and has students trace the traveler’s journey. As a culminating activity, students don a Chinese dragon costume and walk to famous locations on the map. This review was originally written by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

China WWW Virtual Library: Internet Guide for China Studies

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its exhaustive links to on-line sources for East Asian History and Chinese history. Although intended for scholars, much can be useful to the world history teacher as well. Start by putting Chinese Propaganda Posters, Rethinking Cultural Revolution Culture, Picturing Power: Posters of the Cultural Revolution, The Chairman Smiles in the entries box at the left hand side of the page. Be aware of the fact that Posters from the former Soviet Union, Cuba and China, and Chinese Pop Posters which are links to sites of Chinese propaganda, many of which can be downloaded. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/13/02; updated by Masataka Kasai, 7/09/03.

China’s Cosmopolitan Age: The Tang (1993). (VHS, 60 minutes) http://www.isop.ucla.edu/eas/web/asiafilm-china.htm

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its examination of China’s golden age of culture. During the Tang dynasty (seventh-ninth centuries), China was remarkably open to foreign trade and ideas. It was a great era for music, dance, poetry, and art and represented the period in Chinese history where Buddhism had its greatest influence. Parts of the documentary are extraordinary, but its pacing is uneven.
Reviewed from UCLA East Asian Studies Center Educational Films on China.

Media Type: Media

China’s Ethnic Minorities and Globalization (2003)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this book attempts to discuss various aspects of minorities such as economy, politics, education, and culture and how globalization has affected China’s ethnic minorities. Topics and materials included in this site are historical background, minorities politics, the economies of the minorities, religion and education, population, and international relations. Start by chapter 1 Introduction as this chapter discusses the definitions of minorities and globalization, and the various impacts of globalization. Be aware of the fact that a list of Chinas fifty-five state-recognized ethnic minorities is provided at the end of the book along with brief description of each.

Citation: Mackerras, Colin. New York: RoutledgeCurzon.

Media Type: Book

China, A Century of Revolution (1997) Author/Director: Sue Williams (3-part box set, VHS)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this three-part series, originally broadcast on PBS, brings the history of modern China to life, with never-before-seen footage and remarkable first-hand interviews, documenting the struggle of the Chinese people to build a modern nation. China in Revolution, 1911(1949, describes the upheaval beginning with the fall of the last dynasty in 1911, through World War II and the bitter rivalry between the Communists and Nationalists. The Mao Years, 1949(1976, tells the story of Mao Zedong and his attempts to build a new China. Born under the Red Flag, 1976(1997, explores China?s transformation after the cultural revolution and Mao?s death. Color/B&W, 19Global Issues-1999; 120min. Recommended for high school.

Media Type: Media

China, Korea, Japan: Videotapes in the Media Resources Center (California)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides the UC Berkeley Library’s primary collection of materials in electronic non-print (audio and visual) formats. Topics and materials included in this site are videocassettes, DVDs (Digital Versatile Discs), and laser discs; compact audio discs; audiocassettes; slides; and interactive multimedia materials about China, Korea, and Japan. Be aware of the fact that “collection” in this site provides links and pull-down menus to find movies by title, director, genres, themes, language / country, and data / era. Reviewed by Masataka Kasai, 4/25/02.

China: Understanding Its Past (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this includes innovative uses of role-playing, simulations, debates, primary documents, first-person accounts, exceprts from literary works and cooperative learning activities to explore these and other key aspects of China’s history and culture from 600 BCE to the present. What did it mean to be a daughter in imperial China: How did extraterritoriality affect China’s ability to cope with foreigners in the 19th century? What was at stake as the Communists and Guomingdang (Nationalists) fought a civil war to win allegiance of China’s people? Recommended for middle/secondary schools.
Reviewed at http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu/eastasia/outreach/videoCatalog/catalog.pdf The East Asia Program Resource Lending Library of Cornell University.
The book is available on loan through Cornell. Instructions for lending are given at the beginning of the catalog.

Citation: Tamura, E. et al. (Eds.). Honolulu: Curriculum Research & Development Group. University of Hawaii, and University of Hawaii Press.

Media Type: Book

Chinasite

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is a commercial site which has links to 8500 websites in and related to China. Anyone can link to the site so there is great variation in what is available. It links to a number of contemporary Chinese music and entertainment sites, Cities and Provinces, Embassies and Consulates, news sites and others which would be interesting for high school and middle school students. Start by any topic that you would like to explore. Be aware of the fact that many of the sites are in Chinese but there are also a number in English. Caution: There is an “adult” category, so it would be necessary for the teacher to monitor any student access.
Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy 3/15/02.

Chinese Characters

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site presents explanation of the meaning of Chinese characters and the Chinese writing system. Topics and materials included in this site are links to cool websites, dictionary web, online readings, vocabulary, learn Chinese, Chinese FAQ, Chinese news, and a search engine. Start by “Chinese FAQ” as this page includes some frequently asked questions about Chinese language. Be aware of the fact that this site also includes Chinese readings with translation of each word.

Chinese Civilization: A Sourcebook (1993, 2nd Edition)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this collection contains translated works of literary and historical significance from ancient to modern times. Price: $19.95. Reviewed from Indiana University East Asian Studies Center Selected Bibliography of Resources — China. Please check this URL — http://www.indiana.edu/~easc/respub.htm

Citation: Ebrey, Patricia B. (Editor). New York: The Free Press [ISBN:002908752X]

Media Type: Book

Chinese Folk Arts (1976) Chinese Art Film, Ltd. (VHS, 24 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because several of China’s folk arts date back more than 2,000 years. This video introduces shadow puppetry, silk embroidery, paper cutting, kite making and flying, lanterns, hand puppetry, and dragon and lion dances.” Recommended for middle/secondary grades. Reviewed from their online catalogue at http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu/eastasia/outreach/videoCatalog/catalog.pdf

Media Type: Media

Chinese Folk Arts (No Date). Chinese Art Film, Ltd. (VHS, 24 minutes)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because “Several of China’s folk arts date back more than 2,000 years. This video introduces shadow puppetry, silk embroidery, paper cutting, kite making and flying, lanterns, hand puppetry, and dragon and lion dances.” Recommended for middle/secondary grades.
Available for loan from the East Asia Program Resource Lending Library at Cornell University.
Reviewed from their online catalogue at http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu/eastasia/outreach/videoCatalog/catalog.pdf

Media Type: Media

Chinese Posters

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is a collection of posters from three periods of Chinese history: Early Years (1949-1965), Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), Modernization (1977-1997) Recommended for high school. A unique view of China’s political history through posters. Can be downloaded and printed. Start by exploring some posters on this page to find out what each poster was meant to be. Be aware of the fact that this website also offers Soviet Posters and Cuban Posters. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy 3/18/2002; updated by Masataka Kasai, 7/09/03.

Chinese Prison Labor: Inside China’s Gulag (1993) Films for the Humanities and Sciences (VHS, 52 minutes, English)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this video is a look at prison labor products and the conditions in China under which they are made. It was shot by Harry Wu, A Chinese dissident, who was released after 19 years in the Laogai, China’s system of 2000 labor campus. He took a video camera into the prisons and documented footage of factories in the camps. Recommended for secondary. Review in the EAP Resource Lending Library of Cornell University.

Media Type: Media

Chinese Tapes (UPenn)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because the online catalog contains complete descriptions of the books and other resources. Be aware of the fact that this is a commercial site that is recommended for its selection of children’s books, many of them bilingual, movies and videos. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 5/09/02

Cholmun nuti namu (A Young Zelkova Tree) (1968, 90 min.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because (Synopsis) Suk-Hee, following her remarried mother, comes to live in her step-father’s house, and there, she meets the son of her new father who is older than her by one year. The two youth get familiar with each other very soon, and begin to feel love. But, as Suk-Hee knows well that she should give up her love for the sake for mother’s happiness, she leave the house and goes down to her hometown. Reviewed by Korea film organization. http://www.koreafilm.or.kr/english/index.asp.

Media Type: Media

Chopsikkot tangsin (You, my rose mellon) (1988, 110 min.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because (Synopsis) Jong-Hwan, who writes poems, meets Su-Kyeong in a cafe and marries her. Jong-Hwan does not know how difficult life his wife leads. She takes care of their children, parents-in-Raw, and brothers-in-Raw in the hard country life. Meanwhile, his wife is ill. When Jong-Hwan brings her to the hospital, it turns out that her disease is already incurable. Jong-Hwan expresses his love through poems, but his wife dies in the end. Reviewed by Korea film organization. http://www.koreafilm.or.kr/english/index.asp.

Media Type: Media

Christians in the Holy Land (1994)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this book is concerned with the present welfare of Christians in the Holy land who share, with Muslims and Jews alike, the Abrahamic tradition. It is a compilation of papers presented in an international seminar held in England in 1993. Topics include a historical survey of church, state, Christian communities and the Holy Places, the tradition of pilgrimage, socio-economic and socio-demographic patterns, and justice and peace. Reviewed by the Publisher.

Citation: World of Islam Festival Trust.

Media Type: Book

Chunhyang Chon (1994)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because (Synopsis) Lee Mong-Ryong, a son of a lord, falls in love with Chun-Hyang, a daughter of a singing and dancing girl in the village, at the Dan-O festival. Because his father’s transference to Seoul, he goes up to Seoul with the promise of marriage with Chun-Hyang. Byeon Hak-Do, a newly appointed lord, gives himself up to win and women. He is attracted by Chun-Hyang’s beauty and asks bed service of her. But she refuses it. Byeon Hak-Do gets angry at this and harasses her by imprisoning her. When Chun-Hyang waits for her death, Mong-Ryong, who won the first place in the state exam, rescues her and promises to marry her. Reviewed by Korea film organization. http://www.koreafilm.or.kr/english/index.asp.

Media Type: Media

CIA Factbook

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides basic statistics on China and background information from the perspective of CIA intelligence gathering. Good site for high school students to see the basic data their government gathers about China. Start by “Introduction” since it provides a brief information about background of China. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy 3/18/02.

Classical Korean Poetry: More Than 600 Verses Since the 12th Century (1994)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because the 600 verses presented in this anthology will provide the reader with comprehensive and varied aspects of the sijo, the traditional Korean lyric, since its emergence as a fixed literary form as early as the late 12th century down to the 19th century. This text refers to editorial review.

Citation: Selected and translated with an introduction by Jaihiun J. Kim. Fremont. CA: Asian Humanities Press.

Media Type: Book

Common Experiences, Different Visions (1994)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because “Common Experiences, Different Visions” is a 5Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute video documentary which presents the differing perceptions of common experiences of two teams of high school students — an American team of students from high schools in the state of Indiana and a Japanese team of students from Kaminokawa High School in Tochigi Prefecture. In the program, the two groups of students participate together in common experiences in both Indiana and Tochigi Prefecture, taping themselves and recording their impressions. The everyday activities the students chose to explore include going shopping, participating in sports, and going on vacation. Each group produced its own program with its own comparisons about how the two groups viewed the activities in which they participated. The two versions were edited with professional help and brought together for this program. A study guide with questions to stimulate classroom discussion accompanies the video.
Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

Contemporary Literature of Asia (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this book serves as an excellent introduction to recent writing from Asian countries. Topics and materials included in this book are a collection of short stories, poems, and plays that represent the very best writing of the past thirty years from Pakistan in the west to Japan and Indonesia in the east. Start by “East Asia” since it provides a collection of short stories, poems, and plays in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.

Citation: Biddle, Arthur., Bien, Gloria., & Dharwadker, Vinay. (Eds.). Upper Saddle River, NJ : Prentice Hall. $38.61.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

Cool Girls

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site attempts to present current trends of fashion or daily lifestyles of Japanese women. This site would be good for high school students to learn about what fashion are trends in Japan. Topics and materials included in this site are information about fashion, shops, and fortune telling. Start byGirls Room” since it provides Japanese girls’ profiles including their favorites, hobbies, and jobs. Be aware of the fact that this site focuses on particular girls rather than every girl in Japan. This resource was originally recommended by the Institute of East Asian Studies at University of California Berkeley.

Country Brief Asia: World Food Program (WFP)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because WFP is the United Nations frontline agency working against global hunger. Topics and materials included in this site are brief information about hunger in Asian countries. Each country page includes overview of the country in terms of hunger, WFP activities to the country, and relevant links. Start byVideo” in “Newsroom” since it provides some WFP videos about global hunger. Be aware of the fact that you need Real Player and Media Player to view the video.

Cultural Properties Administration (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site runs the Cultural Properties School, produces and distributes CD-ROMs and carries out a number of programs to help the people better understand traditional Korean culture through cultural properties. Topics and materials included in this site are search engine to find cultural properties, cyber tour into cultural properties, information about world cultural heritages in and out of Korea, a map of Royal Palace in Korea and information about major buildings in the palace, and related links. Start by “Theme Tour” in “Cyber tour into Cultural Properties” as it provides all lists of theme tour. Be aware of the fact that this site is also available in Korean. This resource was written by East Asian Studies Center Indiana University.

Culture & Language: Life in Korea (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its precise information about daily life of Korean people. Topics and materials included in this site are cultural spotlight, scenes of Korea, ceremonies and festivals, Korean practice, English practice, and language exchange. Start by “Traditional Korean Alcohol” in “Cultural Spotlight” since it provides information about various aspects of Traditional Korean Alcohol including history, definition, types, culture, health features, and drinking etiquette. Be aware of the fact that this site is a part of “Life in Korea” presenting everything you need for your life in Korea. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Culture and Customs of China (2002)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book is aimed at students, travelers and other readers seeking to understand the modern people and culture of China in the context of ancient history. Provides an overview of China’s history and people, geography, society, philosophy and religion, and the arts in an accessible style. Contains a list of suggested readings.
Reviewed from http://www.international.ucla.edu/publications.asp.

Citation: Gunde, R. UCLA Center for China Studies Cultures and Customs of Asia Series.

Media Type: Book

Dalmaga tongtchok uro kan kkadakgun (The reason why Dalma went to the west)(1989, 170 min.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because (Synopsis) When Hae-Jin kills a bird, she sees the dualism of life and death that dominates the phenomenal world. She realizes the fundamental agony of life such as the death, transience, attachment, affliction, Shin and fear. She experiences the existence of life and death, good and evil, and she learns that the life is empty and the thing that is born is not dying. Reviewed by Korea film organization. http://www.koreafilm.or.kr/english/index.asp.

Media Type: Media

Daum – one of the most popular fortal sites in Korea (written in Korean)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site written in Korean is one of the most popular fortal site in Korea. The word “Daum” in Korean means “the next” in English. Topics and materials included in this site are just like the yahoo, lycos, hotmail, google, and other fortal sites. Although I know you can

Digital China/Harvard Site

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of the use of primary sources and images from the film The Opium War. This is an internet-mediated educational channel with China. This is a useful site for high school world history. Start by a page on the Opium War with Chinese Commissioner Lin Zexu’s letter of advice to Queen Victoria, dated 1839 (which served to precipitate the war) Be aware of the fact that some of the links provided on this site do not work.

Discover Japan/A Look into Japan (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides concise information on Japan and Japanese culture, live videos in Tokyo, and numerous photos of Japan. This site would be used for both junior high and high school students. Topics and materials included in this site are information about general information of Japan and Japanese culture, history of Tokyo, Kyoto, and Mt. Fuji, major cities in both Tokyo and Kyoto, photo gallery, quiz of Japan, discussion forum on Japan and Japanese culture, and live videos in Tokyo. Start by “Culture of Japan”. This unit provides general information about Japanese geography, traditional arts, cooking, language, holidays, religions, festivals, and legends. It is also recommended that you can show live videos in Tokyo through “Tokyo”. Be aware of the fact that this site provides “Quiz Japan” so that students are able to review what they learned from this site. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Discover Korea : School and Community (1988) Grades: Elementary Education, Secondary Education

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because a series of three video packages prepared for use in elementary and junior high schools. This popular series introduces Korean life as seen through the eyes of Korean schoolchildren. Each 2Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute video centers on a theme introducing Korean culture and society from different perspectives. FAMILY AND HOME A visit with a Korean middle school student and his family. SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY A trip to a Korean school and an opportunity to join in community life. GEOGRAPHY AND INDUSTRY A guided tour of diverse regions of South Korea emphasizing geography’s impact on lifestyle. An easy-to-use teacher’s manual and a double-sided classroom poster accompany each video. Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Discover Korea: Family and Home (1988) Grades : Elementary Education, Secondary Education

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because a series of three video packages prepared for use in elementary and junior high schools. This popular series introduces Korean life as seen through the eyes of Korean schoolchildren. Each 2Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute video centers on a theme introducing Korean culture and society from different perspectives. FAMILY AND HOME A visit with a Korean middle school student and his family. SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY A trip to a Korean school and an opportunity to join in community life. GEOGRAPHY AND INDUSTRY A guided tour of diverse regions of South Korea emphasizing geography’s impact on lifestyle. An easy-to-use teacher’s manual and a double-sided classroom poster accompany each video. Reviewed by Asian Educational Media Service.

Media Type: Media

Dreams (1990)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because This film consists of eight episodes exploring the costs of war, the perils of nuclear war, and humankind’s need to harmonize with nature. Man is Genius When he is dreaming.
Reviewed by University Center for International Studies (UCIS) of University of Pittsburgh.

Media Type: Media

Favorite Icon

East Asia in Transition: An Instructional Guide and Video (1996) Southern Center for International Studies World in Transition Series

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of an educational package divided into five topics, including an overview, politics, economics, social issues, and US interests in East Asia. Comes with a videotape. Recommended for secondary schools. Can be ordered online for $20.00. Reviewed from the Indiana University East Asian Studies Center Selected Bibliography of Resources. Please check this URL — http://www.indiana.edu/~easc/respub.htm

Media Type: Media

Echoes of the White Giraffe (Grade 7-9) (1993)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is a sequel to Choi’s autobiographical novel, Year of Impossible Goodbyes (1991). Sookan, aged 15, has escaped with her mother and younger brother from the bombing of Seoul during the Korean War. They live in a refugee mountain community in Pusan, and when the war ends, return to rebuild their home in Seoul. The death of Sookan’s father is another emotionally upsetting experience as she struggles for independence within the restrictions of her society. Readers will experience the joys and bittersweet emotions of her first love and learn that the Korean courtship ritual is very different from American dating customs. This resource was originally reviewed by Mary Miller, East Asian Library, University of Pittsburgh.

Citation: Choi, Sook Nyul. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. ($13.95) ISBN 0395647215

Media Type: Book

Electronic Journal of Contemporary Japanese Studies (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because the EJCJS is a journal in the social sciences that is dedicated to publishing academic research and scholarly writing on all issues related to contemporary Japanese society, economy, politics, and culture.
This resource was originally reviewed by Outreach Asia, Center for Asian Studies, The University of Texas at Austin.

Encountering the Chinese: A Guide for Americans (2nd Ed.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Encountering the Chinese is an insightful book with the practical cross-cultural analysis of Chinese culture. The books intention is to decrease anxiety and make things easier for Americans interacting with Chinese. It is neatly structured, and the language is kept as simple as possible with a friendly tone. The authors provide a practical and sensitive cross-cultural analysis of Chinese culture along with insights into how best to communicate and interact with Chinese people. As the economic and diplomatic climate in China has changed, the frequency of contact between Chinese and Americans has increased in all areas: business, academic, scientific, professional, personal and cultural, making this book even more valuable. Relying on Hus innate knowledge of Chinese culture and Groves American perspective including his substantial experience in China, this informative and practical handbook for cross-cultural interaction will enable Westerners and Chinese to establish more productive and rewarding relationships both inside and outside the PRC.

Citation: Hu, Wenzhong and Grove, Cornelius L. (1999). Intercultural Press. $21.95.

Media Type: Book

Ethnic Minority Groups in China (2003)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this unit challenges students to examine a notion of homogeneity of Asian countries and also offers students a chance to examine the experiences and challenges of another country’s ethnic groups. 221 pages, 5 lessons CD-ROM with images for each lesson Secondary While many outside of China believe that China is an ethnically homogeneous nation, it is actually quite diverse. Although roughly 92 percent of the Chinese population is classified as ethnically “Han,” there is great diversity even within this majority group. For instance, within the Han nationality, there are 7

Citation: Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE) http://spice.stanford.edu/ldml/viewpub_sp.lasso?id=20202 $49.95

Media Type: Book

Ethnicity in Asia (2003)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this book attempts to report general information and insights into issues relating to ethnicity in East and Southeast Asia. Topics and materials included in this book are a collection of articles on ethnicity and relating issues in various Asian countries such as China, Japan, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Start by Introduction as this chapter discusses general information about ethnicity in the world, human rights, and definitions of some terms such as indegenous people or minority. Be aware of the fact that each chapter includes a list of recommended books for further reading.

Citation: Mackerras, Colin. (Ed.). New York: Routledge Curzon.

Media Type: Book

Ethnologue country index — Languages of the World

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it lists all languages for each country with very detailed explanation, including the languages which are not commonly spoke and almost extinct. Start by the World , which provides an overall picturee. Be aware of the “more information” link for each language. This function will take viewer to more details about the langauge as well as its speakers.

Faces of Change. Film/video essay series. Color, 13-34 minutes each

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this revolutionary series of 26 – 16mm films and videos, funded by the National Science Foundation, produced by Norman Miller and documented by some of the finest ethnographic filmmakers of our time is now available through D.E.R. The films examine 5 cultures selected for the diversity of their geographic location:starting with the China Coast at sea level and moving up to Taiwan, then to Afghanistan, Kenya and finally to the mountains of Bolivia. Each location is examined through 5 themes: Rural Society, Education, Rural Economy, Women and Beliefs. Detailed instructors notes are available for an additional $10.00.
Contact them for rental or sale information.
Reviewed from Documentary Education Resources website www.der.org

Media Type: Media

Families of the World: Families of South Korea (2000)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because like the other videos in the Families of the World series, Families of South Korea is composed of two 1Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute segments, one detailing the family life of a rural child and the another the life of an urban child. This video is the most recent addition to the series and makes the most mention of political issues. Recommended for Grades K-4. Review by Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Media Type: Media

Family (1931)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it shows three sons of a traditional extended family confronting the contradictions between the feudal past and a modernized future. Each one compromises or rebels in a different way, reflecting not only the social unrest in China of that period but also the varied psychological responses to a time of social transition. Filled with highly dramatic events, the novel’s force springs largely from the tragedy involved in broken family ties. Recommended translation: Olga Lang (Tanslator). Family. New York: Anchor/Doubleday, 1972.
Reviewed by East Asian Project of Columbia University. http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/

Citation: Ba Jin (Pa Chin)

Media Type: Book

Famous Japanese (Kansas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site presents a list of detailed information about Japanese famous figures. Topics and materials included in this site are information about Japanese famous people in modern-day Japan by dividing them in seven categories: musicians, politicians, sports figures, TV & movie personalities, cultural leaders, writers, and others. Start by searching for detailed information about particular famous Japanese that they are interested in or already know. This resource was originally recommended by the Center for East Asian Studies at University of Kansas.

Farmers’ Dance : Poems (1999)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of the SHIN KYONG-NIM’s first volume of poems, Farmers’ Dance (Nong-mu), marked a major new step in the development of modern Korean poetry when it was published in 1973. The life of Korea’s oppressed rural masses had never before been highlighted in such a manner. For years, the poet had shared that life as a laborer and salesman, and the poems reflect a deep identification with classes and situations that were normally not considered suitable subjects for poetry. This volume offers a full translation of the poems of the expanded 1975 edition, making available in English for the first time one of the most influential works of modern Korean poetry. Reviewed by Korean Studies Review, Intercultural Institute of California.

Citation: Kyong-Nim, Shin Translated by Brother Anthony of Taize and Young-moo Kim. Cornell Univ East Asia Program($17.00)

Media Type: Book

Finding My Voice (Grade 7-9) (1992)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of the story that Korean immigrant parents pressure high school senior Ellen sung to get into Harvard. The high school senior tries to find time for romance, friendship and fun in her small Minnesota town as she faces simmering racism from some of her classmates and even a teacher that becomes impossible to ignore. This resource was oroginally reviewed by Mary Miller, East Asian Library, University of Pittsburgh.

Citation: Lee, Marie G. Boston: Houghton Mifflin ($ 13.95) ISBN 0395621348

Media Type: Book

Folktales from China (1998-2002)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of about a dozen folktales from China are reproduced on this site. Each tale includes a brief description of its type and sometimes a comparison to others in the genre. The source of the tale is given and several are from Chinese collections. Recommended for middle and high school. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 4/04/02.

Citation: Selected and edited by D.L. Ashliman http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/china.html#goldcolt

Media Type: Book

Folktales from China (Pittsburgh)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides Chinese folktales and relevant links. Topics and materials included in this site are eight Chinese folktales and three links to other three Chinese stories. These folktales and stories will be suitable for higher elementary school students since most of them are long and complex. Be aware of the fact that this site is a part of “Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts,” collection of folktales around the world, by Dr. Ashliman of University of Pittsburgh, which helps students to learn similarities and differences among the folktales by comparing them. This resource was originally recommended by Asian Studies Program at University of Pittsburgh.

Folktales from Japan (1998-2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site has the texts for eight Japanese folktales and a link to seven legends of “supernatural sweethearts.” There is a brief description which gives the source of the tale and sometimes some cultural information. Suitable for middle and high school. Selected and edited by D.L. Ashliman. Reviewed by Mary Anne Flournoy, 4/04/02; updated by Masataka Kasai, 7/16/03.

Geographic Perspectives: North Korea (2004)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book offers a geographic analysis of North Korea. Topics and materials included in this book are 13 chapters including some aspects of both physical geography and a human geography such as inhabitants and their way of life. Start by chapter 2 Location as this chapter attempts to help readers better understand North Koreas geography. It discusses the fact that North Korea is roughly equivalent in size to New York State. Be aware of the fact that there are some colorful photos on North Korea and its geographic portrait.

Citation: Palka, J. Eugene., & Galgano, A. Francis. Guilford, Connecticut: McGraw-Hill/Dushkin.

Media Type: Book

Glimpses of Japan Through Comics (1985)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this text presents a slice of Japanese culture and family life through a series of nine short comic strips. Each strip is preceded by a background essay and followed with frame by frame explanations and questions for discussion. (Grades 6 and up.)
Reviewed by Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Citation: Allen, Caron. Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Media Type: Book

Great Tales in Asian Art, Kultur International Films (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because filmed on location, four beloved stories of India, Indonesia, Korean and Japan are told through the masterpieces of visual art and the stirring performances tehese tales have inspired for centuries. “The Ramayana,” the epic adventures of India’s legendary hero, are illustrated with Indian paintings, Indonesian sculpture, Javanese shadow play and dramatic reenactments. In the “Korean Masked Dance Drama,” told by actors wearing audaciously conceived masks, social satire is “masked” by bold humor and comic dance. “Gita Govinda,” Indonesia’s great erotic poem, is interpreted by a danger and celebrated in lyrical painted images. Finally, “The Tale of Genji” is told by a Japanese woman in period costume, as colorful paintings from scrolls and screens illustrate Japan’s most famous romantic novel. (Running time: 82 min.)
Reviewed by East Asia Resource Center University of Washington.

Media Type: Media

H-Japan: History of Japan (Michigan)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is an international nonpartisan electronic discussion group sponsored by H-Net, Humanities-On-Line (http://www2.h-net.msu.edu/) and the Kansai Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies (KIAPS) (http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~kiaps/) of Osaka University of Foreign Studies. Topics and materials included in this site are a list of electronic discussion groups that scholars, graduate students and professionals discuss Japanese history, culture, religion, and society, including contemporary political, diplomatic, security, and economic issues, and book reviews. Start by “Recent Messages” in the front page since it provides you an opportunity to find out what topic participatns discuss in this on-line discussion forum. Be aware of the fact that you need to register to obtain their discussion postings. This resource was originally recommended by the Centers for Japanese Studies at University of Michigan.

Hakka – An important element of Chinese culture

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site attempts to promote cultural diversity and explore certain historical and cultural aspects of the Chinese people. Topics and materials included in this site are discussion forum, current news, history, language, Hakka people, Hakka houses, Hakka Associations, resources, Hakka links, and Chinese culture. Start by the front page of this site since it provides information about Who are the Hakkas. Be aware of the fact that “America” discusses who the first Chinese in America was.

Half Korean (Stanford)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides many personal websites and stories of “half Koreans” whom you might meet in your classroom. It will be very helpful for teachers to understand Korean American students. Topics and materials included are half Koreans

Han Sorya and North Korean Literature: The Failure of Socialist Realism in the DPRK (1994)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of this first and only study of North Korean literary history by a Western scholar deals with the crucial role played by Han S(rya, chairman of the D.P.R.K.’s Federation of Literature and Art from 1948 to his purge in 1962, both in devising the iconography of Kim Il Sung’s personality cult and in defining the early course of North Korean letters. Through brief studies of Han’s own canonical works the author also sets out to dispel the widely-held assumption that North Korean literature is compatible with Soviet and Chinese socialist realism. The appendix includes a complete translation of Han’s 1951 novella Jackals (Svngnyangi). Reviewed by East Asia Program, Cornell University.

Citation: Myers, B. Ithaca, N.Y.: East Asia Program, Cornell University. ($17.00)

Media Type: Book

Handbook of Korean Vocabulary (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this first-ever “root dictionary” of Korean designed for second-language learners contains more than 1,500 lists of words built from shared roots. The lists offer a unique and efficient way for learners to acquire new words. On encountering a word, one can consult the lists for its component roots and discover many other semantically related words built from the same elements. The Handbook consists of two sections, one presenting roots of Chinese origin and the second containing native Korean roots. Within each section, each list begins with the relevant root written in Korean script together with the Chinese character (if there is one) and its English translation. The entries for individual words within a list include information about each item

Citation: Choo, Miho., & O’Grady, William. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press

Media Type: Book

Hands-On Africa: Art Activities for All Ages

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it is a good resource for the elementary grades. This text invites children to explore the wildlife and indigenous peoples of Africa. Mask making from Zaire and hats in Nigeria are two of the many ways readers encounter knowledge of Africa. The crafts use common materials in unusual ways.

Citation: Y. Merrill and M. Simpson (2000) .

Media Type: Book

Hangul: Korea’s Gift to the World (1997) Korean Language Information Society (Planning) Cheong Soo Suh (Script and Producer) Seung Ho Park (Photography) Bong Won Yi (Director) Cinepia Production, Inc. (Production) Korea, Ministry of Culture and Sport

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this popular series introduces Korean life as seen through the eyes of Korean schoolchildren. Each 2Slavic and Eastern Europe-minute video centers on a theme introducing Korean culture and society from different perspectives. An easy-to-use teacher’s manual and a double-sided classroom poster accompany each video. Media/Type: 1 videocassette (41 min.): sd., col, 1/2 inch; VHS format. Description: Through interviews and animated sequences, explores the origins of the Korean han’gul alphabet and its interest today to linguists and speakers of the Korean language. Also gives a brief overview of the han’gul characters and the sounds they represent. Other Information: Title also in Korean characters. Call Number: PL918 .H36 1997 Review by the University of Kansas East Asian Library.

Media Type: Media

Homes Apart: Korea (1991)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of the one-hour documentary of one man’s journey to find his lost sister in North Korea to examines the Korean division from both sides of the border. From the Japanese occupation through the Korean War, the film provides both a historical and personal introduction to this embattled peninsula, along with a critical look at contemporary North and South Korea. Broadcast on PBS. By filmmakers J.T. Takagi & Christine Clay. Excellent video. Reviewed by Columbia University, East Asian Curriculum Project.

Media Type: Media

Hong Kong in Transition: A Look at Economic Interdependence (1999)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because students will come away with a clear understanding of the concept of economic interdependence, as well as key facts about Hong Kong’s role in Asia, past and present. In 1997 the world watched with mixed feelings as Hong Kong was returned to Chinese rule. The handover was politically and historically significant, but foremost in many minds were the economic implications. Recommended for secondary schools. Reviewed from SPICE catalog on line

Citation: SPICE http://spice.stanford.edu/ldml/viewpub_sp.lasso?id=10051

Media Type: Book

House of the Winds (2002)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of the story of a girl’s childhood in Korea, Yun’s first novel is a warm and vivid reminiscence of the relationship between a girl and her mother. The Korea of her memories was occupied by the Japanese, whose harsh rule was followed by the devastation of the Korean War. Young Wife, her mother, is a quietly courageous woman who keeps her three children together. Though abandoned by her husband, she manages to provide food, clothing, shelter, and schooling while she nourishes the children?s souls with tales of a forgotten peaceful time in Korea: a time when tigers smoked pipes and history, tradition, and magic blended together to create an exciting and viable culture. Eloquently written in language that is both metaphorical and poetic, this is an excellent addition to the series. Reviewed by Janis Williams, LIBRARY JOURNAL, October 1, 1998

Citation: Yun, Mia New York : Interlink Books($ 10.36)

Media Type: Book

Images of Korea II (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is made of contents about Korean alphabet, Korean sports, Korean handicrafts, Korean architecture, Korean music (Samulnori), Masterpieces of Korea. Reviewed by Center for East Asia Studies, University of Kansas.

Media Type: Media

Individual Rights in International Perspective: Lessons on Canada, Mexico, Japan, and Nigeria (1993)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this book makes an effort to develop curriculum materials on the significance of the U.S. Bill of Rights in the framing and exercise of government in other nations. The lesson plans presented in this book could be used in middle and high school classrooms. Topics and materials included in this book are lesson plans about four countries: Canada, Mexico, Japan, and Nigeria in terms of the political and social systems influenced by the U.S. Bill of Rights, and bibliography in each section. Start by the last three lessons in Japan section since these three lessons provide a comparison of constitutional rights in postwar Japan and the United States and two case studies of the exercise of individual rights in postwar and contemporary Japan.

Citation: Miller, Barbara., Parisi, Lynn., et al. Social Science Education Consortium

Media Type: Book

International Society for Educational Information (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides information about Japan and Japanese traditional culture, and lived video of various places in Japan. This site would be good for junior and high school students. The topics and materials included in this site are information about Japanese traditional culture, real-time view of various places in Japan including Mt. Fuji, Tokyo, or Lake Biwa, a map of Japan in prefectures, and a table of Japanese history. Start by “‘Japan Now’ Window” since it provides brief information about the places that can be viewed through a real time view camera. It is also recommended to use “Prefectures of Japan” in order to introduce all prefectures of Japan and their locations. Be aware of the fact that you can purchase CD of photos of Japan and books issued by International Society of Educational Information. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Internet Chinese Music Archive (Wisconsin)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides large collection of audio files (in SUN Audio format) of many types of music in China. Categories include traditional, modern, popular, ceremonial, foreign, and Revolution-era Beijing Opera. Start by hearing historical speeches in Chinese by Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai, Deng Xiaoping, and Zhu De. Be aware of the fact that the site is located at the University of North Carolina. There is a new category of Children’s Songs. When you enter the site, click on “Mirror Sites” to get to links to other Chinese music web resources and FTP sites for users to download the audio files.
This resource was originally reviewed by Center for East Asian Studies at University of Wisconsin Madison.

Japan 2000 (1997)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because there are three series of the video to introduce various aspects of Japan.

Japan 2000
Nebraska Educational Television Network in cooperation with US-Japan Public Television Council. Lincoln, NE : Great Plains National Instructional Television Library, 1988.2 videocassettes (27 minutes each)
Program 1. The view from within
Program 2. Global perspectives
Examines the Japanese and their leadership in the global community, and how they view themselves and their work. Looks at the changing role of women in Japan, its aging population, economic restructuring, and regional development.
Call Number: DS889 .J295 1988
Location: Watson Library-Reserve

Japan 2000
BBC. [Princeton, N.J.]: Films for the Humanities & Sciences, c1997.
1 computer optical disc. System requirements for Macintosh; System 64030, 68040 or Power PC that supports a 640×480, 256 color (8 bit) monitor ; dual-speed or better drive; system 7.1 or later, with CD-ROM extensions and Quick Time 2.0 or later (included); 4MB RAM.

Call Number: DS806 .J14 1997
Location: Watson Library-Reserve

Japan 2000
Director, Andy Walker ; producer, Susan Francis ; a Case Television production for BBC Education in co-production with NOT (The Netherlands) and in association with NRK (Norway), YLE (Finland) and NHK (Japan).
Princeton, N.J. : Films for the Humanities & Sciences, c1998.
4 videocassettes (20 min. each).
Four BBC programmes focus on the topics of transport, energy, industries, agriculture and quality of life in Japan. Originally broadcast in the schools television series: The geography programme.

Call Number: HC462.95 .J37 1998
Location: Watson Library-Reserve

Media Type: Media

Japan and Global Migration: Foreign Workers and the Advent of a Multicultural Society (2003)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because the twelve essays collected here bring together the most up-to-date, original research on foreign workers and households from a variety of perspectives. Throughout, three key questions are addressed: Does the recent wave of migration constitute a new multicultural age that challenges Japan

Citation: Douglass, Mike. & Roberts, Glenda. (Eds.) University of Hawaii Press

Media Type: Book

Japan in the Classroom Elementary and Secondary Activities (1993)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this activity book presents information and insights on Japanese culture and society. The activities presented in this book could be introduced to K-12 students. A list of activities including title, grade level, time required, topic, and activity description provided in this book will help teachers. Topics and materials included in this book are 26 classroom activities organized into three sections: Society and Culture, Japanese Language, Literature, and Art, and Japan and the world. Start by “The Japan Connection in Your Community” and “The Japan Connection in Your State” since these two activities provide students with an opportunity to realize cultural connection between their own communities and states and Japan.

Citation: Parisi, Lynn., Johnson, Jacquelyn., & Weiss, Patricia The National Council for the Social Studies

Media Type: Book

Japan Past and Present (The Age of The Shoguns; 1600-1868) (1989)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this film attempts to present the age of the Shoguns in Japan. During the era of Edo, the two and a half centuries when Japan was sealed off from the rest of the world, only a handful of Dutch and Chinese, constantly watched and treated like pariahs, were allowed to live on Japanese soil and trade with the Japanese. This program treats the history of Japan during this period: the established classes of daimyo, samurai, farmer, and merchant; the political organization of the shogunate; the growth of the merchant class and the development of Kabuki; the delineation of Japanese sensibilities and the meaning of seppuku.
Reviewed in the EAP Resouce Lending Library Catalog at Cornell University.

Media Type: Media

Japan Thru Young Eyes (UCLA)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site makes an effort to present Japan as it appears in the eyes of young people living in Japan today. Topics and materials included in this site are information on various topics including “Living Tradition,” “Superstition in Our Life,” food, One-Day Training at a tofu shop, Japanese ghost stories, and survival information. This page will be nice to show students what Japanese young people value and how. Start by any topic that students are interested in. But I think “Superstition in Our Life” will be interesting to elementary students since the superstitions are deeply embedded in Japanese people’s life and affect their beliefs and behaviors. Be aware of the fact that the information is gathered by students at Kanda University of International Studies and Bunkyo Women’s College. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at University of California Los Angeles.

Japan Times Online (Texas)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its up-to-date information about Japan and life in Japan. Topics and materials included in this site are general news, business, opinion, arts & culture, life in Japan, sports, festivals, and cartoon. Start by “Life in Japan” as it presents current trends or lives of Japanese people. Be aware of the fact that this site provides “Weekly Roundup” offering a list of key words for weekly news in Japan.

Japan- Snapshots of Asia Big Book (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this big book offers an excellent way to develop literacy and introduce knowledge and appreciation of our Asian neighbours to the classroom. Self contained double page spreads display appealing full colour photographs, fact files, board games and stories of daily life which capture the distinctive physical and cultural aspects of life in Japan.The teacher guide (which is available separately- $32.95) contains additional information, classroom activities designed to develop reading and writing, speaking and listening skills, and blackline masters.
Reviewed by Access Asia.

Citation: Sue Ledger and Richard Ledger. Carlton South, Vic: Curriculum Corp.

Media Type: Book

Japan-Guide: Japanese History (Washington)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is designed to describe Japanese history. It would be good for high school students. Topics and materials included in this site are critical information on Japanese history divided into distinctive time periods: early Japan, Nara and Heian periods, Kamakura period, Muromachi period, Azuchi-Momoyama period, Edo period, Meiji period, Taisho and Early Showa period, and Postwar period, and other history related pages such as emperor, atomic bomb, and religions, and historic photo exhibitions. Start by “Periods of Japanese History” since it presents an overview table on Japanese historical events. Be aware of the fact that the page in each time period includes key words hyperlinked to the relevant websites. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asia center at University of Washington.

Japan: A Country Study (Library of Congress) (California)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site offers overview of Japan and Japanese culture. This site would be good for junior high and high school students to learn about general aspects of Japan and Japanese culture. Topics and materials included in this site are country file of Japan, Japanese history, society and environment, education and arts, economy, politics, foreign relations, national security, bibliography of books cited in this site, and glossary. Start by any topic provided in this site. This site would be used as primary resource when introducing Japan. This resource was originally recommended by the Institute of East Asian Studies at University of California Berkeley.

Japan: Images of a People (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides brief, but concise essay about general aspects of Japan and screens of Japanese traditional arts, and three lesson plans to teach about Japan and Japanese traditional arts. This site would be good for junior and high school students. Topics and materials included in this site are short essay about geography, climate, vegetation, rice growing and processing, architecture and furniture, clothing, and screens of Japanese traditional arts, three lesson plans to teach about Japanese geography and Japanese traditional arts, and resources related to Japanese traditional arts. Start by “Getting Started” in the frong page of this site to learn about how to use this site and “Introduction” with “Background Essay” to teach based on it. Be aware of printable lesson plans including materials in Adobe Acrobat format. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Japanese Cultural Encounters and How to Handle Them.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book attempts to present Japanese unique culture or customs that people coming to Japan usually encounter. This book would be good for junior high and high school students. Topics and materials included in this book are 56 situations, each characterized by a conflict or misunderstanding, which are introduced by dividing them into four topics: human relations at work and leisure, etiquette, formalities, and customs, Japanese expressions, and handy trivia. Reviewed by Masataka Kasai, 5/1/02

Citation: Kataoka, Hiroko C., & Kusumoto, Tetsuya. (1991). Lincolnwood, IL: NTC Publishing Group. $9.95.

Media Type: Book

Japanese Culture Constructed by Discourses: Implications for Applied Linguistics Research and ELT (1999)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this article critiques the assumed representations of Japanese culture in the applied linguistics literature and the West – East dichotomy of cultural representations, and discusses nihonjinron (theories on the Japanese) and critical multiculturalism. Topics and materials included in this site are Japanese culture in the applied linguistic literature, the cultural representation of the other as constructed by discourse, the discourse appropriated by the other, counterknowledge from recent research on Japanese education, and critical approaches to culture and language.

Citation: Kubota, Ryoko. TESOL Quarterly, 33 (1), 9-35.

Media Type: Book

Japanese Girls and Women (2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this book provides information about various aspects of girls and women in Japan that seems to be usually left out or misunderstood in the books introducing Japan and Japanese culture. Topics and materials included in this book are childhood of Japanese girls, education that Japanese girls and women receive, marriage and divorce, wife and mother, old age, court life of Japanese women, life in castle and yashiki, samurai women, life in the cities, domestic service that Japanese women serve, within the home, and ten years of progress. Start by “TEN YEARS OF PROGRESS” since this chapter presents how status of Japanese women have been promoted for the last ten years. I would use this chapter to make students aware of change of position of Japanese women from 1990s to present.

Citation: Bacon, Alice New York : Kegan Paul

Media Type: Book

Japanese History and Literature (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this material helps students discover what Japanese literature reveals about the history and culture of this innovative country. The Programs include interviews with specialists from Columbia University and excerpted permoances of major works.
Individual Programs
Classical Japan and the Tale of Genji (552-1185)
The Japanese genius for cultural borrowing, waka poetry, prose, and the literary contributions of women. Program length: 45 minutes.

Medieval Japan and Buddhism in Literature (118Slavic and Eastern Europe-1600)
The warfare and disruption of Japans feudal era and a comparison to medieval Europe, along with the influence of Buddhism on literature and drama. Program length: 45 minutes.

Tokugawa Japan and Puppet Theater, Novels, and the Haiku of Basho
The dramatic changes of this era, which laid the basis for the Meiji period, and how literature gave voice to the new urban population. Program length: 70 minutes.

Curriculum Package
3 Programs (varying lengths) on 3 cassettes
Guide
Right to duplicate one set of videos
CA98101-JPSVE — $110
Each program with guide — $49.95
Coordinated Print Guide: Japanese History and Literature (1997)
Enrique and Martin, The Annenberg/CPB Project ($15.00)

Media Type: Media

Japanese Old Photographs in Bakumatsu – Meiji Period

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is an English-Japanese site for a collection of hand-tinted photographs of Japan, 1860-1920, showing foreign settlements, urban and rural scenery, culture, people, in Tokyo, Nagasaki, Osaka, Kobe, and elsewhere. Start by any search engine depending upon what image you are looking for. This site provides four types of search engine so that you can find images based on words, key words, areas, and shelf number. Be aware of the fact that the collection holds over 5000 images.

JapanKit.

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because JapanKit is a teaching resource appropriate for grades K – 12, however it is focused on grades K – 5. It is available to educators in Michigan, northwestern Ohio, and northern Indiana. The JapanKit consists of three boxes of goods and articles that represent or explain some aspects of culture and life in Japan. Each box is aimed at a certain grade level: Lower Elementary, Upper Elementary, and Middle/High School. It is a resource tool in which you may find fun-filled, hands-on items to explore and share with your curious students. The JapanKit includes: A teacher’s notebook with suggested student activities Books and magazines Video and audio tapes Maps, posters, and art work Japanese clothes Toys and crafts A full inventory of each kit is available as follows: Lower Elementary Upper Elementary Middle/High School The use of the JapanKit is free. The Center for Japanese Studies will pay the shipping charge to send out the kit; the user agrees to pay a $25 damage/replacement refundable deposit for each kit and return shipping fee prior to loan. Remit checks to “The University of Michigan.” There is a maximum of ten days for use.

Citation: Center for Japanese Studies (CJS) at the University of Michigan. http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/cjs/resources/teacher.html

Media Type: Book

Jing, A Chinese Girl (1990) Leslie Schwartz (VHS, 18 minutes, English)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this video features a typical Saturday and Sunday in the life of a fifth-grade student In Hangzhou, China. Viewers meet her family and friends, and follow her to school.
Recommended for its glimpse of everyday life for elementary/middle school.
Reviewed from East Asia Program Resource Lending Library online catalog.

Media Type: Media

Jurist – World Law (Pittsburgh)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because of its attempt to provide laws around the world. This site is edited by a team of Net-literate law professors from law schools across the United States and around the world. Topics and materials included in this site are information about laws around the world including Asian countries. Start by any country that you would like to introduce since each country page offers information about its constitution, government, and legislation.
This resource was originally recommended by the Asian Studies Program at University of Pittsburgh.

Kaebyok (The Convulsion) (1991, 146 min.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because (Synopsis) This film revolves around the life of Choi Shi-hyong, head of the religious sect, Chondogyo, in the later part of the Chosun Kingdom. He is constantly sought and harassed by the authorities. In 1864, Choi Jeh-woo, the reformist and founder of the Chondogyo sect is executed on charges of “deluding the world and deceiving the people”. His successor, Choi Shi-hyong, begins to receive a ground swell of support from an increasing number of people. He then finds himself the subject of oppression by the court. He is separated from his family and goes to hide in a hermitage in the Taeback Mountains. With the belief that his wife is dead, Choi burns the tablet delicated to her and flees to an even more remote region of the mountains. Reviewed by Korea film organization. http://www.koreafilm.or.kr/english/index.asp.

Media Type: Media

Kids Peace Station Hiroshima (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site makes an effort to present a life of Sadako Sasaki who was a victim of the atomic bomb and provide a chance to talk about peace. Topics and materials included in this site are The Sadako Story 21, Sadako and the Atomic Bombing, Kids Peace Plaza (Discussion Forum), Kids News, and relevant links. Start by “The Sadako Story 21″ since this movie file provides students with an opportunity to learn about a life of one kid victim of the atomic bomb and what we can do. Be aware of Be aware that you need Flash Player (plug-in) in order to watch the movie files (A link to the website to download Flash Player is provided in this site.) This resource was originally recommended by East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Kids Web Japan (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides a wide range of general information, plentiful pictures, and photos on Japan and Japanese culture, and contents for elementary students. It would be good for low elementary students. Topics and materials included in this site are cultural, historical, political, economical overviews of Japan, daily lives of Japanese school children, maps of Japan, and quizzes on Japan and Japanese culture. Start byExplore Japan” since this page presents basic information of various topics about Japan such as geography, weather, daily life, politics, culture, economy, history, and sports. Be aware of the selection of the topics and contents that elementary school children learning about Japan seem interested in and other languages are available to see this site. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Kilsottum (1985, 105 min.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because (Synopsis) During the summer in 1983 when the campaign for reunion of the dispersed family members are proceeding, Hwa-Young goes to participate in it by husband’s recommend searching for her son. In past, she had moved to Kilsotteum and lost her parents. Thence, she lived with father’s friend Kim Byeong-Do and falls in love with his son Dong-Jin. She happens to meet Dong-Jin who’s been waiting for her though he had married another woman and looks for her son Seok-Cheol with him. She meets Seok-Cheol, but because of awkwardness of 33 years, they get parted with each other again. But she acknowledges him as her son with tears on her cheeks. Reviewed by Korea film organization. http://www.koreafilm.or.kr/english/index.asp.

Media Type: Media

King Sejong’s Secret (2001)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because set in Korea in the mid-1400s, this enchanting tale takes place during the reign of real-life King Sejong, who is credited with the creation of Korea’s hanguel alphabet. In Farley’s fictional account, the compassionate king is inspired to create a simple system of writing to replace the complex 10,000-character Chinese method after a young boy who tends his garden expresses a deep desire to learn to read and write. It turns out that creating the 28 symbols of the new alphabet is considerably easier than convincing the Korean people that using it will not anger the gods. Again the young gardener provides the inspiration–and also the handiwork needed to get the job done. The result is a magical ending in which village elders and teachers, when they see the symbols etched in the leaves of the garden, believe the gods are now embracing the new alphabet. Highly detailed, beautifully rendered scenes provide important visual clues about the story, and an informative author’s note enhances the tale. Ages Slavic and Eastern Europe-8.
Reviewed by Lauren Peterson, American Library Association

Citation: Farley, Carol., Cooper, Floyd., Jew, Robert. Lothrop Lee & Shepard. ($15.89)

Media Type: Book

Kokoro (1957)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site presents his great novel, Kokoro, in English translation by Edwin McClellan. “The subject of ‘Kokoro’, which can be translated as ‘the heart of things’ or as ‘feeling’, is the delicate matter of the contrast between the meanings the various parties to a relationship attach to it. In the course of this exploration, Soseki brilliantly describes different levels of friendship, family relationships, and the devices by which men attempt to escape from their fundamental loneliness. The novel sustains throughout its length something approaching poetry, and it is rich in understanding and insight. The translation, by Edwin McClellan, is extremely good.”
Reviewed by Anthony West in The New Yorker.

Citation: Natsume, Soseki http://www.eldritchpress.org/ns/soseki.html

Media Type: Book

Kokoro by Soseki Natsume (Duke)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site presents his great novel, Kokoro, in English translation by Edwin McClellan. “The subject of ‘Kokoro’, which can be translated as ‘the heart of things’ or as ‘feeling’, is the delicate matter of the contrast between the meanings the various parties to a relationship attach to it. In the course of this exploration, Soseki brilliantly describes different levels of friendship, family relationships, and the devices by which men attempt to escape from their fundamental loneliness. The novel sustains throughout its length something approaching poetry, and it is rich in understanding and insight. The translation, by Edwin McClellan, is extremely good.” This resource was originally recommended by Asian/Pacific Studies Institute at Duke University and reviewed by Anthony West in The New Yorker.

Korea and Komestay (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its efforts to help international visitors to find their place to stay in Korea. Topics and materials included in this site are information about a home-stay program in Korea, Korean language, useful link, and tour and travel. Start by “tour and study” since it provides basic information to live in Korea such as history, culture, and environment. Be aware of the fact that this site offers BBS where you can interact with people interested in Korea. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Korea Broadcasting System Website (Written in Korean) (Stanford)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site is one of three nationwide Broadcasting Systems’ websites. You can see a lot of Korean TV programs, which will make you look inside the Korean culture. Topics and materials included in this site are TV programs, radio programs, news, music studio, sports, and TV commercials. Start by just clicking and looking around this website to figure out what are the differences and similarities between KBS and one of American nationwide broadcasting websites because this site is written in Korean. Be aware of the fact that you need to sign up in order to see the programs broadcasted and you probably can’t read the contents. But I hope you will meet Korean contemporary culture with Korean letter and language. This resource was originally recommended by the Center for East Asian Studies at Stanford University.

Korea in American Textbooks and Reference Works (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site contains a large amount of information about how Korea is treated in textbooks and written for the secondary schools in the United States. This site rates the qualities of textbooks and corrects the wrong information about Korea. Topics and materials included in this site are not only information about Korea in world history, world geography, world culture, and American history textbooks but also information about Korea in encyclopedias and CD ROMs in the United States. Start by “Overviews” since it shows us this research methods, findings, and conclusion which arouse us the importance of treating other countries and cultures correctly and fairly.
Reviewed by Sung Choon Park, 5/26/02. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Korea National Tourism Organization (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site provides extensive information on the capital city in Korea, Seoul, where is the center of political, economical, cultural lives of Korean. Topics and materials included in this site are sightseeing, food & shipping, festivals, and culture. Moreover, “Essential Info” contains the basic and essential information on Korea. Start by “AD Gallery” which will give you the beautiful images of Korea. And I also encourage you to find the mixed combination of the traditional and contemporary culture. Be aware of the fact that you need to log in to receive full service. This resource was originally recommended by East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.

Korea.net: Korean Government Homepage (Indiana)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of the official South Korean English-language web site. This site was reorganized a while back and is a bit confusing. However, it is the portal to a treasure trove of official South Korean government information, from press releases to white papers to statistics. Start by a diagram showing the current structure of the South Korean government as it is VERY difficult to find elsewhere. Also, a list of current high government officials, the press releases, reports, and bulletins of the Ministry of Unification are recommended. Be aware of the fact that it will take some time to explore this site since this site holds tons of information.
Reviewed by The Korea Society. This resource was originally recommended by the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.