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A Garden of Eden In Decay (The Africans). (1986. 58 min. Video/C 945.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this resource identifies the problems of a continent that produces what it does not consume and consumes what it does not produce. It shows Africa’s struggle between economic dependence and decay and examines economic and agricultural failures and successes in Algeria, Ghana and Zimbabwe.

Media Type: Media

A Life Like Mine

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, March 3, 2010

A Life Like Mine tells the story of how children live around the world through four themes:  survival, development, protection, participation.  Excellent images and text suitable for upper elementary and middle school students. Truly has a global perspective. Includes many visuals and maps.

Is is published by UNICEF.

Media Type: Book

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A Man of the People (1966).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this novel foreshadows the Nigerian coups of 1966 and shows the color and vivacity as well as the violence and corruption of a society making its own way between the two worlds. This book is a satirical expose of a corrupt post-colonial government. Recommended for young adult readers.

Citation: Achebe, Chinua

Media Type: Book

A Story, A Story (1970)

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Recommended because this tale explains how Anansi obtained the world’s stories from God. Anansi the Spider is determined to buy back the stories taken from the people and kept by the Sky God. It has lively, evocative language and compelling illustrations that extend and illuminate the narrative, although Aardema’s version may be more suited to preschool listeners.

Citation: Haley, Gail

Media Type: Book

Adinkra Cloth (PBS Kid’s Africa)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides basic information about the Adinkra Cloth, a hand-printed fabric made in Ghana. Developed by the Ashanti people, Adinkra cloths were traditionally made for royalty to wear at religious ceremonies. This site teaches kids how to make their own Adinkra cloths and to tell a story or to express their thoughts or feelings though the decoration on the cloths with traditional Ashanti symbols. Great for elementary school kids.

Africa Access

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Recommended because this site provides access to over 1000 recommendations and reviews of African books as well as instructional materials for teaching and learning about Africa. Strength(s) of site: Teachers are able to search for books and materials on different topics (apartheid, history, women, etc.) and time periods (1600s, early 1900s, 1990s). Start by searching for materials by country or topic of interest. Teachers may enroll in the Africana Book Buddies Club, which encourages students to read African literature. Be aware of the fact that many of the reviews and annotations were written by university professors, librarians and teachers who have either lived in Africa or earned degrees in African Studies. An excellent resource for reading reviews on children’s literature as it relates to Africa.

Africa on Roots World

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Recommended because this site offers reviews of African recordings by region, interviews with African musical artists and sound files such as the ensemble Samsu from Serrekunda, Gambia, or some new voice to the sounds of Cameroon from the artist Gino Sitson. There are also links to related sites.

Africa World Press and Red Sea Press (Publisher & distributor of books from Africa

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Recommended because these two publishers offer books from Africa that can provide primary sources, fiction and other excellent sources of African content. See sections on African women, children’s lit, history and specific countries.

Africa’s 100 Best books of the 20th Century

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Recommended because this site is a showcase of print and electronic resources on Sub-Saharan Africa from the Zimbabwe International Book Fair. Start by visiting the Links section in order to access information on other international book fairs, library and research-related sites, publishing & book selling sites, literature & cultural sites, etc.

African Beginnings (1998)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a picture book which introduces various African kingdoms and events, including several in Ghana. This informative picture book is a handsomely illustrated overview of Africa’s ancient empires. Readers learn that Egypt was once ruled by the Kushites, whose kings were shown in temple and tomb depictions as black pharaohs. There is just enough information in the text to leave children curious to learn more about these ancient empires, and the extensive bibliography points to more detailed sources.

Citation: Benson, James & Kathleen

Media Type: Book

African Books Collective (Publisher & distributor of books from Africa)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because African Books Collective is owned and governed by 63 independent African publishers. It seeks to strengthen indigenous African publishing through accessibility to African scholarship and culture. It is non-profit making, and supported by government agencies and development organizations. See sections on folklore, children’s books, literature, history, law, humor, and many other topics. Start by clicking on children’s books .

African Images (1984).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it details the vast diversity of wildlife found within each of Africa’s various habitats – forest, river, soda lake and Rift Valley, swamp and marsh, bush, grassland, and savanna and examines the way animals interact within these environments.

Citation: Dorcas MacClintock, pictures by Ugo Mochi. NY: Charles Scribner’s Sons

Media Type: Book

African Jim (1995. 51 min. Video/C 4008)

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Recommended because made on the eve of apartheid’s inception, this is the first full length feature film made in South Africa with an all native African cast. Featuring top African singers and music of the 1950′s, this is a unique record of a lost era.

Media Type: Media

African Music Encyclopedia

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides rich introduction about African music, including a list of musical artists organized alphabetically by artists’ name or by country. It also offers links to general, country-specific information on all the countries of Africa. Be aware of the fact that there is a Glossary of African music terms, which will be useful to those new to the music in this region.

African National Congress

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Recommended because this site provides historical documents about the ANC movement from its incipient struggle against apartheid to its transition into the dominant political party of the modern South African state. Documents concerning conventions, speeches, and constitutions, affiliate organizations, major campaigns, and political trials are included. Photographs, international allies and responses, and biographies are also available.

African Odyssey Interactive

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Recommended because this interactive site offers a listing of African art from around the world as well as a variety of educational resources. African Odyssey Interactive also features a section titled “Spinning Africa: Stories from Life”. This section invites teachers and students to share their own interpretation and understanding of African cultures through stories, music, dance, and other forms of creative expression.

African Writers: Voices of Change (by University of Florida)

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Recommended because this site provides access to short biographical pieces on Chinua Achebe, Ama Ata Aidoo, Ayi Kwei Armah, Buchi Emecheta, Bessie Head, Alex La Guma, Dambudzo Marechera, Ezekiel Mphahlele, Alan Paton, Okot P’Bitek, and Amos Tutuola. A substantial page for Francophone African poets in English translation is also now available, including brief biographical sketches as well as short excerpts from each author’s work. Lastly, the site also provides additional links for accessing resources about African literature.

africancraft.com

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Recommended because this site brings together african craftsman, artists, and designers, as well as artists influenced by african art. The site profiles artists and artistic techniques for both traditional and modern art forms. Start by going to the section on education to view detailed lesson plans on kente cloth weaving and other activities. The site also features an on-line shopping mall, with items that can be used for teaching such as adrinka stamps.

Akan Cultural Symbols Project

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Recommended because it provides information about the art of the Akan people of Ghana and kente weaving. This project is designed as an educational resource to show the relationships between Akan visual arts and Akan verbal genres. It is also to show some aspects of the rich cultural heritage of the Akan of Ghana. Topics and materials included in this site are architecture, metal casting, wood carving, textiles and pottery. Be aware of the fact that sample lesson plans recommend purchase of CD of artistic slides from the site.

Akan Goldweights

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Recommended because of its rich collection of information and photos of Akan gold weights. The Akan people live in the southern part of Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire. The Akan gold weights exhibit animation, humor, and freedom of expression coupled with endless variety. Their details excite curiosity about their origins and meaning. Such inquiry is rewarding, because gold weight forms often reflect Akan history and life, from religion and politics to social behavior and responsibilities of the individual. Site also contains similar display of the Yoruba culture of Nigeria.

Ake: The Years of Childhood (1981).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is an autobiography of Nigeria’s Nobel laureate in literature, Wole Soyinka. He describes the subject in intimate and humorous detail from a very early age to age eleven. Soyinka, a playwright, poet, novelist, teacher, and activist delights us with a remarkable memoir of his growing up in the urban Christian, Yoruba home of his parents in western Nigeria during the 1930s and 1940s. This book will be a classic in its genre and gives insight into life in contemporary Nigeria. For the non-specialist, it is a more accessible piece of literature than his novels and it is a good compliment to other African literature that gives readers a sense of rural community life. Soyinka brings to life his adventures and delights as a three year old, the vitality and busy life of the compound of a school headmaster, describes his siblings, extended family, and his parents (especially his mother, whom he refers to as “Wild Christian).” This very Nigerian autobiography provides memories so that readers can identify with the universal childhood experience.

Citation: Soyinka, Wole. Random House.

Media Type: Book

Alan Paton’s Beloved Country ([1999?] 54 min. Video/C 7677)

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Recommended because Alan Paton — teacher, author, politician — was one of South Africa’s most remarkable sons. This documentary reveals the man and the complex relationship he had with his country. Repelled by the racism he saw in the homeland he loved, his Christian conscience propelled him into the world of political action. He wrote Cry the Beloved Country, the novel that had the most profound impact in the world-wide struggle against apartheid. This documentary relates the author to his work and includes Paton reading extracts from his novel.

Media Type: Media

America, Spare Somalia for God’s Sake

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an insightful source of information and opinions on Somalia. Please review the following information: Nuruddin Farah, January 2, 2002 in the Monitor, Kampala. A version of this opinion column by the renowned Somali novelist also appeared in the New York Times on January 9 under the title “Somalia is No Hideout for Bin Laden.”

Amoko and Efua Bear (1989)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is a picture book about Amoko, a little girl living in Ghana, who takes her favorite teddy bear everywhere that she goes and is heartbroken when she thinks he’s lost.

Citation: Appiah, Sonia

Media Type: Book

Anansi and the Moss-Covered Rock (1993)

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Recommended because it tells the story of Anansi the Spider, who uses a strange moss-covered rock in the forest to trick all the other animals, until Little Bush Deer decides he needs to learn a lesson. The text is rhythmic, nicely building suspense to the inevitable conclusion. Stevens’ complementary, colorful illustrations add detail, humor, and movement to the text. Here, Anansi is portrayed as a large eight-legged arachnid; his expression is in his motion. The other animals are almost realistic, although with facial expressions that are characteristic of the artist’s work. This new picture book Anansi tale will be welcomed by all trickster fans.

Citation: Kimmel, Eric A.

Media Type: Book

Anansi Does the Impossible (1997)

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Recommended because it tells the story of how Anansi and his wife outsmart the Sky God and win back the beloved folktales of their people. Retold from Aardema’s The Sky God Stories (Coward, 1960; o.p.), the tale rollicks along at a rhythmic merry pace, full of descriptive ideophones (sounds that express movement or emotion). The lively narrative is perfect for reading aloud, and the inclusion of Aso is a particularly nice touch. Desimini’s textured collages portray the spider couple as cheeky and cherubic in their boldly patterned clothing. The extravagant, vibrant illustrations fill the pages and complement the text beautifully. The depictions of the defiant Anansi confronting the Sky God, a gigantic, disembodied head, are particularly effective.

Citation: Aardema, Verna

Media Type: Book

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Anansi, the Spider: A Tale from the Ashanti (1972)

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Recommended because this picture book uses Asante art forms to tell the story of Kwaku Anansi and his six sons. This story, retold and illustrated by Gerald McDermott, relates the tale of father Anansi and his six spider sons. When Anansi sets out on a dangerous journey and gets into all sorts of trouble, each son does one thing to help, and all their efforts together save their father. This profound story reaches children of many ages; younger ones see it as an exciting rescue story, but older children are intrigued by the larger themes of cooperation and “the whole being more than its parts.”

Citation: McDermott, Gerald, Henry Holt

Media Type: Book

Ancestor Tree (1994)

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Recommended because this is a story of an old man Nna-nna and the children who eagerly come to listen to his wonderful stories every morning. The old man gets sick and he is sad because he has no children and there will therefore be no one to plant an Ancestor Tree in the Forest of the Ancestors when he dies. Only someone who has living children can have an Ancestor Tree planted for them. The children promise to plant an Ancestor Tree for him. After Nna-nna’s death the children convince the Village Council to plant an Ancestor Tree for Nna-nna. One of the elders says, “You children have taught us that customs have a beginning, customs can change, and sometimes, customs come to an end. We have decided to end one custom and begin another.” Apart from being a good story, The Ancestor Tree provides a corrective to the view of traditions in African societies as static. Here we see tradition evolving as is always the case.

Citation: Echewa, T. Obinkaram. New York: Dutton/Lodestar.

Media Type: Book

Art and Life in Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because the site provides an introduction and guide to the related CD-ROM project. Online resources include profiles of 107 African cultures and 27 sub-Saharan African countries, a databank of 47 lesson plans for K-12 teachers, and a Teacher’s Forum with a discussion group and chat room.

Asante: The Gold Coast (1996)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides a well-written and historically accurate account of the Asante kingdom. Gives myths of origin of the Akan peoples, early history of Akan clans and explains how they came to unite in more recent centuries especially during the British invasion. Photos are rich and helpful in picturing the historical periods. For middle school and up.

Citation: Koslow, Philip. Chelsea House.

Media Type: Book

Asinamali! ( 1995. 66 min. Video/C 4012)

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Recommended because This play, commissioned by the BBC, is written, directed, and acted by “The Committee Artists”, a South African performing group. Five prisoners in a South African jail recall–through word, song, and dance–the events which have brought them there. “Asinamali” means we have no money. The men portrayed in “Asinamali” have been victimized by the laws, police brutality, unemployment, and humiliation of apartheid. Based on the play by Mbongeni Ngema.

Media Type: Media

Azikiwe, Dr. Nnamdi

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides an account, in four parts of the life of Nigeria’s first President, Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe. The site also provides historical photographs of Dr. Azikiwe. For links to parts 2-4 go to the following web address:http://www.greatepicbooks.com/epics/.

Black Hawk Down (newspaper series, November-December, 1997) (Somalia)

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Recommended because it provides access to newspaper articles which focus on the motion picture Black Hawk Down, the American helicopter operation in Somalia in 1993. Start by browsing through the “Analysis” and “Background” sections at the top right corner of the index page, with an analytical article by Mark Bowden.

Black Man’s Cry (1992)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because Fela Kuti, one of Nigeria’s most controversial and unique musicians, dubs his sound, “Afrobeat.” In this recording, as in others, he incorporates elements of West Africa highlife, James Brown-style funk, jazz and traditional Yoruba rhythms. He combines intense often-political messages with call-and-response vocals. Anikulapo-Kuti, Fela. (sound recording) An audiocassette consisting of six songs.

Media Type: Media

Bopha! = Arrest! (1995. 59 min. Video/C 4006)

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Recommended because of its portrayal of the play, Bopha!, which depicts South Africa’s dreaded black police force, the tool of apartheid. Through the play the audience sees the reality and effects of South Africa’s apartheid. Includes additional live footage of the black force in action. A classic of the South African township theatre movement of the 1980′s. The Earth Players production of Percy Mtwa’s Bopha! was produced at the Market Theatre, Johannesburg, South Africa. Start by Information about purchasing videos or video distributors should be directed to Ann Moen (amoen@library.berkeley.edu) or Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)

Media Type: Media

Breaking the Cycle (Africa: Search for Common Ground; 2.) (1997. 26 min. Video/C 5345)

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Recommended because Part of a series profiling formal efforts by various Sub-Saharan African countries to peacefully resolve contemporary conflicts. Examines the issue of domestic violence were we meet abusers and victims working to break the vicious cycle in South Africa’s Alexandra Township.

Media Type: Media

Bride Price (1976)

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Recommended because this book is a tragic novel of love and rebellion set in Nigeria in the 1950s. The Bride Price is both an easy and enlightening read. Buchi Emecheta deftly captures the girl’s adolescent fragility and power as she struggles to carve out her identity amongst the dictates of patriarchy, which her mother upholds to the point of betraying her own vulnerable daughter. Recommended for young adult readers.

Citation: Emecheta, Buchi. Braziller.

Media Type: Book

Business Day (Johannesburg)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an online edition of South Africa’s main financial newspaper. Has stock exchange news, back issues which are keyword searchable, a Document archive will have publications such as the national budget, white papers, company announcements, has a free, for now, personalized news service, one can email questions about doing business in South Africa, there is a discussion forum, glossary of financial terms, an economic calendar of events, has audio and video files from its TV program.

California Newsreel

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Recommended because This website provides the latest in educational videos related to African American history, African cinema, race relations and diversity training. The Library of African Cinema is a video library arranged by topic. A few of the general topics explored are Gender and Women’s Studies, Francophone Africa, Political and Economic Development, Anthropology and Folklore, Health Issues and South Africa. In addition, the site provides a concise annotation of each film/video. Some films/videos are available in French and Portuguese. Information about pricing and policies is available at the site, and high schools qualify for discounts. Start by going to Francophone African Films . Here visitors can read additional information about newly released films which focus on Francophone Africa. Or click on Suitable for High School Use . Be aware of the fact that several of the films/videos are available in other languages – French or Portuguese.

CARE in Kenya

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Recommended because this site provides basic information about Kenya and describes the CARE projects in Kenya. Be aware of the fact that Users may also key in “Kenya” at the homepage of http://www.careusa.org/ to check out more related information about Kenya.

Changing This Country: The Testimony of Four South African Workers (1988. 58 min. Video/C 1265)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a narrative of the life and political activism of four workers in Port Elizabeth, a heavily industrialized city on the southern coast of South Africa , in 1987. Subtitles when a speaker uses a language other than English.

Media Type: Media

Channel Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is an International short-wave radio service operated by the South African Broadcasting Corp. Visitors to this site can read news stories in English, French, Portuguese, Chinyanja, Silozi and Swahili. Has continent wide news and the broadcast schedule. For those with sound cards/speakers/Real Player you can listen to the news from Johannesburg, see SABC TV news such as the opening of the South African Parliament (transmission may not be very good), or listen to music. I recommend beginning with Africa Perspective. This is an in-depth discussion program with experts sharing their views on political, economic, cultural and social events happening on the continent.

Chiefs and Strongmen (Struggle for Democracy). (1989. 57 min. Video/C 1888)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this program looks closely at three African nations where western-style democracy has not taken root; Nigeria, Zimbabwe, and the Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

Media Type: Media

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Children of Apartheid ( 1987. 49 min. Video/C 1263)

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Recommended because this is a film about young people in South Africa in 1987 hosted by Walter Cronkite. Interviews with black and white youth, including Zindzi Mandela and Roxanne Botha, daughters of Nelson Mandela and President P.W. Botha. A look at the country’s troubled present and at those who will shape its future.

Media Type: Media

City Press (Johannesburg)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an online edition of the print Sunday paper aimed at an urban black readership. Nearly half the paper’s readers are from Gauteng Province. The newspaper was first established in 1982 as Golden City Press and was the first national Sunday newspaper aimed at the Black market.

Coalition on Violence Against Women (COVAW) – Kenya

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Recommended because this is a membership-based non-partisan, secular, feminist network of individuals and organizations who are committed to eradicating violence against women. Be aware of the information on COVAW available at: http://www.covaw.or.ke/html/programmes.html

Coastweek.com (Mombasa)

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Recommended because it is the online edition of the weekly print newspaper. The site has information related to news, sports, entertainment, weather etc. Start by visiting the Headlines section to know more about the current events in Kenya from a local perspective.

Colors of Ghana (1999)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it explores the different colors found in Ghana?s history, culture and landscape. Colors of Ghana is a delightful introduction to a plethora of facts about Ghana. The book starts with a solid introduction about the country: flora and fauna, borders, population, ancient and modern history and languages. It then goes on to enlighten the reader using ten colors: gold, white, orange, gray, green, black, tan, blue, brown, and silver. Each color is used to introduce various cultural, geographical, historical and other aspects of Ghana.

Citation: Littleford, Holly

Media Type: Book

Cora Connection

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Cora Connections provides an introduction to the music of the Mandinka people of West Africa including information on the land, the local instruments, including the harp-lute, kora and the ancient African lute, ngoni, as well as the Mandinka culture.

Corridors of Freedom (1987. 51 min. Video/C 1047)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it focuses on economic interdependence and collective self reliance of the Southern African states in the framework of the Southern African development coordination.

Media Type: Media

Cross Cultural Collaborative

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Cross Cultural Collaborative, Inc. is a non-profit educational organization that promotes cultural exchange and understanding. Artists and educators from Ghana and the US make up the board and staff of the organization. Their programs bring together artists of different generations and cultures, encouraging them to get to know each other through the language of art. CCC, Inc. invites artists and scholars from all over the world to work with Ghanaians on collaborative projects that range from mosaic walls to adire cloth to documentary films. Start by looking at
workshop descriptions to see the descriptions of past and future workshops being given at CCC’s center in a suburb of Accra. A teacher’s workshop is being planned for 2006. You can also look at video clips of adrinka printmaking and other activities.

Cry Freedom (1987. 157 min. Video/C 999:226)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because as this film stars Denzel Washington and Kevin Kline, it is based on books Biko and Asking for Trouble by Donald Woods. Director, Richard Attenborough. It is a story of South African Black activist Stephen Biko and liberal White newspaper editor Donald Woods who risks his own life to bring Biko’s message to the world.

Media Type: Media

Cry, The Beloved Country (1995. 106 min. Video/C 999:1467)

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Recommended because directed by Darrell Roodt, with actors like James Earl Jones, Richard Harris, Vusi Kunene, Leleti Khumalo, Charles S. Dutton, this is a story of two fathers living in South Africa, a black minister and a white farmer, whose lives are bound together by mutual tragedy. Based on the novel of the same title by Alan Paton.

Media Type: Media

Cutting to the Essence, Shaping for the Fire

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is an experimental online catalog for an exhibit of Yoruba and Akan art. This website includes photographs of a variety of pieces along with their histories. It presents its catalog in three sections: “The Doorway,” which begins on this page and includes an “Introductory Essay,” and other background on the exhibit;
“Cutting to the Essence,” an illustrated essay-exhibit by Michael Conner on Yoruba art in wood and metal; and
“Shaping for the Fire,” a similar exploration of Akan goldweights by Martha Ehrlich.

Death and the King’s Horseman (1987).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book is based on a real incident, this riveting play reveals the power of Yoruba culture and cautions against the hasty imposition of foreign values. It is seen as a good introduction to African thought and tradition. While it is frequently read, however, the play is seldom performed outside of Africa. Soyinka himself has directed important American productions, in Chicago in 1976 and at Lincoln Center in New York in 1987, but these productions were more admired than loved. Although respected by critics, Soyinka’s plays are challenging for Westerners to perform and to understand, and they have not been popular successes. Death and the King Horseman is considered by many to be among the best of Wole Soyinka’s plays, which number more than a dozen. In awarding Soyinka the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1986, the Swedish Academy drew special attention to Death and the King

Citation: Soyinka, Wole. Hill and Wang.

Media Type: Book

Delta Force (1995, 54 minutes)

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Recommended because this video chronicles events in the mid-1990s when the Ogoni people of southwestern Nigeria stepped up their efforts to oppose environmental pollution caused by the extraction of oil by Royal Dutch Shell in the Niger Delta. Nigeria’s military regime responded with extensive military operations, in particular targeting supporters of MOSOP (Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People) and its leader, the prominent writer Ken Saro-Wiwa who was executed for his efforts November 10, 1995. Catha Films Production for Channel Four (UK).

Media Type: Media

Don’t Leave an Elephant to Go and Chase a Bird (1996)

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Recommended because it tells the story of how Anansi Spider Man trades various items with the people he encounters, until he himself is distracted by a bird and ends up empty-handed.

Citation: Berry, James

Media Type: Book

Drum (1979).

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Recommended because this is an example of Nigerian folklore. The story focuses on a tortoise’s quest for power, which brings disharmony to the world.

Citation: Achebe, Chinua

Media Type: Book

Ear, the Eye and the Arm

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Recommended because this is a science fiction adventure story about three Zimbabwean children who are kidnapped in the year 2194. They pass through several situations that test their strength psychologically and physically and lead them to understand better their own values. Their parents hire three detectives, the Ear, the Eye and the Arm, to find the children. The book may capture the interest of middle school age children because it poses dangerous situations for the kidnapped children and shows how they use their ingenuity to escape. To a more mature reader, the book is very didactic, an allegory of what the author sees as Zimbabwe’s choices for its future.

Citation: Farmer, Nancy. (1994). New York: Orchards Books.

Media Type: Book

East Africa Living Encyclopedia — Kenya

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides genaral introduction and detailed information about Kenya in the fields of demography, education, ethnic groups, folklore, food, government, history, human rights, languages, religions, etc. Be aware of the fact that besides Kenya, there are also living encyclopedia for Tanzania, Uganda, Burundi and Rwanda.

East Asia at the Center: Four Thousand Years of Engagement with the World (2000)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its efforts to present the extensive involvement of the peoples of East Asia in world affairs before the beginning of recorded history. Topics and materials included in this book are maps of East Asian countries in particular time periods, tables of some notable dates, figures, and events of certain time periods, and fourteen chapters on development of international system and connection in East Asia from 3500 B.C.E. to the present in a chronological order. Start by the first chapter titled “The Emergence of an International System in East Asia” since it provides information about how people in East Asian countries, especially for Chine, Japan, and Korea were involved as active participants in the international relations of the regions in ancient time.

Citation: Warren, I. Cohen. New York : Columbia University Press. $22.50.

Media Type: Book

Educating Lucia. (Life, Part 25), (2000. 24 min. Video/C 7785).

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Recommended because this media resource focuses on the story of three African sisters who want to graduate to secondary school but are more likely to receive no formal education, working as seasonal laborers on one of Zimbabwe’s large tobacco farms. They’re being raised by their grandmother who can only afford school fees for one girl. In African countries such as Zimbabwe, Uganda and Benin the odds are dramatically against girls getting an education.

Media Type: Media

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Egyptology Resources

Posted by: globaledadmin on Thursday, December 24, 2009

Recommended because of its resources on Egyptology. Click on “Essential Resources“, under “Main Pages” for links to sites on Copts, Byzantine Egypt, Ptolemeic Egypt, an Ancient Egyptian dictionary, and many others.  I recommend teaching about Christian Egypt to get away from stereotyping, and provide a fuller picture of the history and culture.  Materials include: journals, magazines, organizations, societies, interesting Egypt pages, personal Egypt pages, other resources.  This site comes recommended by Education Index, Suite101.com, Excellence in Education, and LookSmart Editor’s Choice and the University of Texas.

Electronic Outreach re Africa, Latin America and the Middle East

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Many U.S. Title VI Centers for International and Area Studies are developing electronic databases for teachers. Scroll down this page to find several exciting new resources on Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Emeka’s Gift, An African Counting Story (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this photo/essay/picture book for young children is an improvement over the author’s earlier book A is for Africa. This story tells of the little boy Emeka, who is on his way to visit his grandmother and is seeking ideas for a gift to bring her, finally reaching her village to be told that this his visit is the best gift of all. Both the text and the pictures show more diversity and give interesting explanations for objects, but sadly, one would have no clue from any segment of this book that Nigeria is the most populous and most urban West African nation.

Citation: Onyefulu, Ifeoma. New York.

Media Type: Book

ePals: Classroom Exchange

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because ePals allows students K-12 to connect with peers around the world through a global social learning network.  Educators looking to collaborate internationally on projects for their classrooms can find specific information links from the homepage- geographically or topically.  Be aware that registration is required, but access is free.  This website also provides a safe, secure learning environment for students.  Updated by Sara Adducchio 2012.

Ethiopia: Traditions of Creativity

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Recommended because this site celebrates the expressive cultures of Ethiopia. It is a place where one can learn about the rich and diverse aesthetic traditions of Ethiopia. Start by the “Artist Profile” section in which each profile is comprised of five parts: a brief autobiography, a short essay that places the artist in a cultural and social context, a gallery of examples of the artist’s work, a map that locates the artist’s home in Ethiopia, and a list of suggested readings for people interested in learning more about the artist and the tradition with which s/he is associated.

Ethnologue country index — Languages of the World

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Recommended because it lists all languages for each country with very detailed explanation, including the languages which are not commonly spoke and almost extinct. Start by the World , which provides an overall picturee. Be aware of the “more information” link for each language. This function will take viewer to more details about the langauge as well as its speakers.

Everyone’s Child, (1996. 83 min. Video/C 5253).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because through the tragic story of one Zimbabwean family devastated by AIDS, the film makes an eloquent call for action on behalf of Africa’s millions of orphaned children. The film was produced in direct response to the prediction that by the year 2000 there will be over 10 million AIDS orphans on the African continent. At the same time, the film focuses attention on millions of other children left homeless by civil wars or abandoned because their parents could not support them.

Media Type: Media

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Favorite! Ghanaian Review International

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a Ghanaian owned news agency. Ghanaian Review International is an independent publication and is not aligned with any political party or interest group, within or outside of Ghana. Strengths of site – easy navigation, seeks to provide a reliable source of information for Ghanaians and non-Ghanaians alike. This magazine will be of interest to any person with an interest in Ghana, Ghanaians and Africans. Ghanaian Review International (GRi) has a moderated list server from Portsmouth University, UK, sends you daily clips on the latest news from Ghana. Start by the link titled Ghana Info (this link could not be located by the reviewer). Here visitors will find information about Ghana?s geography, festivals and regions. Be aware of the fact that now you can automatically subscribe and unsubscribe yourself from this list server by simply sending a message to: maiser@pbs.port.ac.uk. Do not include a subject heading. In the body of the mail type: subscribe gr-L. Do not include any signatures. This website is the on-line arm of the publication. It contains news and reviews on Ghana and the international communities.

Favorite! Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this text is a stunning picture book, Mufaro’s beautiful daughters, one selfish and unkind, the other sweet and generous, go before the king, who is choosing a wife. Review: Steptoe’s last offering before his untimely death in 1989 is an adaptation of a Xhosa tale from South Africa. Steptoe has changed the setting of the story from Xhosa land to old Zimbabwe and he used African Americans rather than southern Africans as the models for his illustrations. Despite these and other alterations, the story works well. As in the old tale, the focus is on sisters with opposite natures. One is kind and gentle, the other bad-tempered and selfish. Each hopes to be chosen by the king to be his wife. In addition to learning that good behavior is rewarded and ill deeds are punished, children soak up the atmosphere of rural and city life in an ancient African kingdom. The book can serve as a useful means of introducing children to the variety of architectural structures in ancient Zimbabwe. Thatched houses and massive stone structures are both featured in the illustrations. The drawings of buildings and people are detailed and stunningly realistic. Storytellers searching for a good read aloud will find this book ably fills the bill.

Citation: Steptoe, John (1987). Publisher: Lothrop.

Media Type: Book

Final Frontier? Land Environment and Pastoralism in Kenya

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Recommended because this guide focuses on the Maasai of Kenya, a small minority group that has received a disproportionate amount of attention in the West. Surprisingly, the authors of this work manage to avoid the stereotypical depictions so commonly found in materials on the Maasai. To begin with, the photographs are not designed as exotic representations rather they convey messages of value as illustrations of Maasai lifestyle. The Maasai are represented as living in a modern state in a real-life manner and the people are dressed in a variety of ways. The focus here is on pastoralism as a means of production that is linked to modern economic and environmental realities. Pastoralism is used to instruct students about the impact of external interventions – tourism, debt and land/resource maintenance – on real people and the earth. The lessons are interactive. Students are invited and motivated to role play in a realistic manner. They are exposed directly to causes and effects, external decision-making, specific domino examples and the results as they affect human lives and resources at various levels.

Citation: Borowski, Richard, Kisopia, Peter and Sayer, Geoff, (1993). Leeds Development Education Center 151-153 Cardigan Rd., Leeds LS6 1LJ, England.

Media Type: Book

Financial Mail (Johannesburg)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is an online edition of the well-known South African business, economic, and political weekly magazine. A subscriber option provides more information than the free site. Past issues are only open to subscribers. Published by Times Media Ltd. who also publishes Business Day.

Focus on South Africa: Time Running Out

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a 56-page issue consisting of 12 lesson plans and student hand-outs about apartheid in South Africa. The issue has good sections on apartheid, but the curriculum is weak on the anti-apartheid struggle and on U.S. relations with South Africa.

Citation: No Author Intercom (a journal published by Global Perspectives in Education, November 1983).

Media Type: Book

Games of Strategy

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Recommended because this book contains useful descriptions, game rules and information on building game boards for a number of games of strategy from Ghana.

Citation: Crane, Louise Available from the Center for African Studies, University of Illinois, 210 International Studies Building, 910 South 5th Street, Champaign, IL 61820, (217) 333-6335.

Media Type: Book

Gamji.com

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is just one of several online news sources in Nigeria. Strength(s) of site – provides links to other online newspapers, which focus on Nigeria, easy to navigate, has chat room capabilities, and has links to international news services. This site has current as well as older news stories from Nigeria. Start by reading the day’s top stories.

Georgina Williams of Ghana (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a teachers’ guide. This video explores the life of children in Ghana by following Georgina Williams, a 9-year-old girl, as she goes through her daily activities. Viewers get to know Georgina as she does her household chores, attends school, hangs out with her friends, and goes shopping with her mother.

Media Type: Media

Ghana (1987)

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Recommended because This text provides a good introduction to Ghana. The book covers the country’s culture and history.

Citation: Hintz, Martin. Children’s Press.

Media Type: Book

Ghana (1994)

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Recommended because it provides large, clear photos and simple explanations. This book manages to cover a great deal of ground very quickly. Readers learn about Ghana’s history, economy, city and rural life; students also briefly “meet” several families, both wealthy and working class.

Citation: Brace, Steve. Wayland Publishers.

Media Type: Book

Ghana Life

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it provides an excellent overview of Ghana today, although not completely up to date. Strength of site — Includes information about the coat of arms, social etiquette, family, geography, regions and their capitals, government, legal system, journalism, clothing, festivals, local time in Ghana and other interesting links.

Ghana Profile From the Library of Congress

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Recommended because the site has a tremendous amount of general information about Ghana ranging from geography, history to Ghana’s educational system. Strength of site – well organized, a good general resource for information about Ghana in the 1990s. Start by visiting the Precolonial Period section, which provides historical information about 16th century Ghana. Be aware of the fact that the information provided was last updated in 1994.

Ghana: A Core Curriculum Teaching Guide (1988)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because provides a highly detailed set of lesson plans on a variety of topics for teaching about Ghana in the first grade.

Citation: Bowens, M., et. al. Published by Wellesley Public Schools.

Media Type: Book

Gift of the Tortoise : A Musical Journey through Southern Africa (1994)

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Recommended because this recording includes Zulu stories and songs. The well-known storyteller, writer and actress Gcina Mhlophe provides narration and Ladysmith Black Mambazo sing the songs.

Media Type: Media

Global Fund for Children (Washington, D.C.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it publishes books that introduces children to cultural, social, and environmental diversity from around the world. The fund makes grants to small community-based organizations around the world that champion the human rights of children. Grants have gone to Kenya, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia. Start by visiting the Shakti for Children section. Shakti for Children is a publishing venture by the Global Fund for Children to help young readers expand their appreciation for the multicultural world they live in. A book of particular interest to elementary teachers and their students: Children from Australia to Zimbabwe. Readers are taken on on photographic journey through the alphabet – exploring a different country with each letter. Readers get a glimpse into the lives of children from diverse nations and cultures.

Gold and Workers, 1886-1924

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book provides a concise overview of historical inforomation on the rise of the gold mining industry in South Africa. Maps, charts, diagrams, and bibliography included. Rather than focusing solely on the struggle between wealthy gold magnates and rural Boers, The author directs much of her attention to the African men and women who labored to make South Africa?s industrial revolutions possible.

Citation: Callinicos, Luli. (1985). Athens, OH: Raven/Ohio University Press.

Media Type: Book

Grain of Wheat

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Recommended because This novel explores tensions and loyalties in colonial Kenya.

Citation: Ngugi wa Thiong’o, (1968) Heinemann.

Media Type: Book

Grandfather’s Work: A Traditional Healer in Nigeria (1998)

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Recommended because this book that explores traditional healing practices in Nigeria. A child describes the work of his grandfather, a traditional healer in a Nigerian village, comparing it to the work of other family members. It includes information about plants used in healing. Recommended for ages six through ten.

Citation: Onyefulu, Ifeoma. Millbrook Press.

Media Type: Book

Great Zimbabwe (African Civilizations Series)

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Recommended because this text provides a survey of the history and culture of Great Zimbabwe, the capital of a powerful city-state that flourished in southern Africa from about 1300 to 1525.

Citation: Bessire, Mark. (1998). New York: Franklin Watts.

Media Type: Book

Guardian

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it serves as another online newspaper in Nigeria. The site provides the latest news stories from Nigeria. Strength(s) of site – easy to navigate. Start by exploring the Education link. Once here, visitors can read the latest news stories concerning Education in Nigeria. Most of the stories tend to address the educational issues of college and university students Nigeria.

Hands-on Culture of West Africa (1997)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a book of reproducible pages, which contain hands-on activities related to a variety of West African cultures, including a number of activities for Ghana. Each project is placed in its cultural context.

Citation: O’Halloran, K. et. al.

Media Type: Book

Harambee Schools Kenya

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is one of several charity organizations that work with rural Kenyan communities to improve educational standards and opportunities. Strength(s) of the site – loads quickly and is easy to navigate. Start by visiting the link titled The Schools . Visitors can read about the schools that comprise Harambee Schools in Kenya. Also available are news stories about education in Kenya.

Hausa Home Page, UCLA

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Recommended because it provides information about the Hausa of Northern Nigeria. Strength(s) of site – offers online Hausa grammar lessons, patrons can hear the pronunciation of Hausa sounds and phrases, some Hausa lessons are downloadable, provides references for the study of the Hausa language. Start by visiting the Who are the Hausa? section and also Why Study Hausa, which provide information about the language and its peoples.

Hausaland : The Fortress Kingdoms (1995).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it specifically focuses on the Hausa. The Hausa are an influential ethnic group in Northern Nigeria. Renowned as traders and architects, the Hausa people of West Africa developed a rich literature filled with proverbs, stories, and historical sagas. About 1,000 years ago, they began building fortress kingdoms. This book recounts the history of their kingdoms.

Citation: Koslow, Philip

Media Type: Book

Hopes on the Horizon: Africa in the 1990s

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site chronicles the rise of pro-democracy movements and the expansion of civil society in Benin, Nigeria, Rwanda, Morocco, Mozambique, and South Africa during the final decade of the 20th century. For each country, there is a profile which includes information such as the official name of the country, population, languages, climate etc., a brief background to the democracy movement, an essay, questions (for high school/university students), suggested readings, and the complete transcript. Start by visiting the South Africa: Story Synopsis section. This segment focuses on building an educational system for all of South Africa’s citizens. The case of Aha Thuto – a high school in the township of Orange Farm, South Africa.

How Anansi Obtained the Sky God’s Stories (1991).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because in this trickster tale from West Africa, Anansi the Spider sets out to retrieve all the stories of the world from Nyame, the Sky God. It is one of the many African tales about Anansi, a spider-trickster in the African oral storytelling tradition. It is an explanatory tale which recounts the genesis of stories.This is a picture book.

Citation: Washington, Donna. Children’s Press.

Media Type: Book

Human Rights Watch. Scared at School: Sexual Violence Against Girls in South African Schools

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this full text report discusses sexual abuse and harassment of girls by both teachers and other students in South Africa. In each of the three provinces visited, cases of rape, assault and sexual harassment are documented.

iafrica.com

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Recommended because it provides general news, business news, entertainment, classified ads, sports, entertainment news, etc. Offers a daily e-mail news service (headlines with links to stories). Partners with 702 Talk Radio, and others. Start by visiting the “Africa” section and find out more about information on African news, travel in Africa, African sites.

Igbo Information

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Recommended because it provides basic information about the Igbo people of Nigeria. The Igbos are the third largest ethnic group in Nigeria. This link is part of the Art and Life in Africa Interactive CD-ROM Project affiliated with the University of Iowa. Strength(s) of site – provides information on more than 100 ethnic groups and 27 countries in Africa, easy to navigate, good resource for accessing background information. Start by visiting the Nigeria Information section. This link provides a map and outlines the regions where major ethnic groups are located.

Igbo-Net

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Recommended because provides information on all aspects of Igbo life, including politics, culture, education, business, entertainment, etc. The site aims to positively showcase Nd’Igbo to the world while creating an enabling environment that will foster a closer relationship between Nd’Igbo in Diaspora and in the homeland. Start by the “Igbo Kaleidoscope” section to find out information about the society, culture and technology of Igbo.

Illustrated History of South Africa: The Real Story

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book provides a general history of South Africa from early times to the late 1980s. Excellent color photographs.

Citation: Cameron, Trewhella & Spies, S. B. (2nd edition, 1995). New York, NY: Random House/Reader’s Digest.

Media Type: Book

In Darkest Hollywood: Cinema and Apartheid (2 videocassettes, 1993. 108 min. Video/C 4010)

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Recommended because it turns the lens on filmmakers and the South African society they so often misrepresented. Films generally supported the ethos of racial domination that led to apartheid and it was only after Africans insisted on being heard that they began to be portrayed on-screen as more than mere adjuncts of whites. Includes newsreel footage of violence in South Africa and interviews with producers, directors, screenwriters, authors and actors who expound upon films they have been instrumental in producing which explored the conditions of black South Africans.

Media Type: Media

In Search of History, Primary Book I

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Recommended because it is part of the In Search of History Series. This workbook uses the family and modes of production as springboards for learning South African history. Three types of African families are introduced and personalized, a gatherer-hunter family, a farming family, and a slave family. Students examine changes in the work and social organization of the families following European settlement. This is an excellent and innovative way to teach history to young students.

Citation: Beck, Leslie, et al. (1995). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Media Type: Book

In Search of History, Secondary Book

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Recommended because this textbook is a collaborative work using the expertise of teachers and respected scholars to introduce historical methods and examine South African history from the late 19th century to the 1994 election. The author challenge stereotypes, correct errors, and stimulate students to think and ask questions. A teacher’s guide for the text is also available.

Citation: Bickford-Smith, Vivian et. al. (1995). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Media Type: Book

International School of Kenya

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides information about K-12 education in this private international school in Nairobi. The site has a brief history, information on their Rafiki Club, a directory of students and faculty, present and past. The directory is very long so only print if one has lots of paper.

Internet African History Sourcebook

Posted by: globaledadmin on Thursday, December 24, 2009

Recommended because this site provides links to articles and references for a wide variety of historical eras and topics, relying on both African and non-African historians of all eras, from Herodotus to Edward Morel to Kwame Nkrumah. Be aware of that not all links are working.

Interracial Books for Children

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because these issues are entirely devoted to South Africa. Contains an excellent review of the depiction of South Africa in U.S. textbooks and other useful materials for preparing a curriculum.

Citation: No Author Bulletin v. 15 #7/8 and v. 16 #5/6.

Media Type: Book

IOL

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because IOL is the biggest news, classifieds and info site on the Web in South Africa. With hundreds of local news items and the latest on a fast-breaking story every day, it is an online site of the print newspaper published by the Independent News and Media Group, along with 14 national and regional newspapers, including most of the country’s best-known titles.

It Needs Political Decisions (Race to Save the Planet), (1990. 60 min. Video/C 1796).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this video examines the power of politics in protecting the environment. Three nations in varying stages of economic development – Zimbabwe, Thailand, and Sweden – offer three different strategies for conserving the environmental future.

Media Type: Media

Jali Kunda : Griots of West Africa and Beyond

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Recommended because this music CD and book, featuring Foday Musa Suso, provide an introduction to one of the world’s richest traditions, that of West Africa’s Griots. For 800 years since the beginning of the Malian Empire, Griots (or Jali) have preserved their region’s history and lore, passing them down orally. Suso, a Mandinka Griot from Gambia, describes the Griot tradition and performs Griot music on the enchanting kora.

Media Type: Media

Jens Finke’s Traditional Music and Cultures of Kenya

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides access to the author’s essays on Kenya’s peoples, cultures, fables and legends, and particularly music, complete with audio clips and photos. Currently 12 out of Kenya’s roughly 42 tribes are covered as part of this on-going project.

Jit (1993. 92 min. Video/C 999:1093.)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because in this film, the beat of jit-jive drives the story, set in Zimbabwe, of a fun-loving youth called UK, who is determined to win the heart of Sofi, a stately beauty closely guarded by her gangster boyfriend. UK’s efforts are both helped and hindered by Jukwa, a pesty ancestral spirit. Directed by Michael Raeburn.

Media Type: Media

Journey to Understanding (1990)

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Recommended because a teenage actress from Zimbabwe in these videos introduces Westerners to modern Africa. Particular attention is given to Zimbabwe. This video collection consist of six videos. Each video lasts about 15 minutes. Beacon Films. Hosted by Eldinah Tshatedi.

Media Type: Media

Joys of Motherhood (1979).

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Recommended because this is a novel of a Nigerian woman’s struggle to find fulfillment as a mother and a woman. This novel explores family ethics. Nnu Ego exhausts herself to provide for her sons, but they do not cherish her before her death. What kind of financial and moral support do children owe to parents who are mentally or physically ill? Or even to parents who are healthy? The novel also makes clear the immense importance placed on male offspring–an issue of great significance in these days of selective abortion. Nnu Ego’s anguish over the death of her first son evokes empathy for parents facing crib death or still birth. The novel is also a troubling account of British imperialism and its effect on the people of Nigeria. Emecheta’s work, interestingly, has received much attention by American and British literary critics but very little from African critics. Mostly, her work is read in non-academic circles.

Citation: Emecheta, Buchi. Heinemann.

Media Type: Book

Kenya

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Recommended because it is an introduction to this East African Country.

Citation: Ng’Weno, Fleur, (1992) Trafalgar Square.

Media Type: Book

Kenya African National Union, KANU

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides information about the government political party. Information accessible about this political party include the party’s history, structure, constitution, manifesto, KANU branch directory, KANU members of parliament, election statistics etc.

Kenya Community Abroad

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Recommended because KCA is a socio-political non-partisan organization, registered in the states of Pennsylvania and Minnesota. The organization is primarily composed of Kenyans living outside Kenya. KCA was founded March 1997 with a view of giving Kenyans abroad a platform in which they can exchange views and help bring change back home. The site contains press statements as well.

Kenya Page by Tim and Lara Beth

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Recommended because this site provides access to basic information about the country of Kenya. Information is provided about Kenya’s history, geography, its peoples, languages and politics. RealPlayer is needed to download and hear the Kenyan national. The national anthem is available is both Kiswahili and English. Very good site for introducing students to Kenya.

Kenya Web

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Recommended because it provides comprehensive information on Kenya’s history, government, economy, tourism, business, education, and etc. It is one of the largest Internet Service Providers and World Wide Web consultancy in Kenya. It can be best described as an on-line encyclopedia showcasing our country, with detailed information on the country’s geography, history, people, culture, economy, and business amongst other sectors.

Kenya, Entering the Politicians Den (Africa: Search for Common Ground; 12), (1997, 25min).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is an interview with Kenya’s Wangari Maathai, the founder of the Green Belt Movement, which organizes rural women to plant and raise trees. Professor Wangari Maathai is a globally recognized environmental leader and an outspoken opponent of the entrenched power structures in Kenya.

Media Type: Media

Kenya: Teaching Resources

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides a collection of books and other resources for teaching about Kenya to K-8 graders as well as adults. Boston University lends many materials out to teachers. Materials are categoried into Children’s Materials, Adult Materials and Additional Resources.

Kiboko Projects

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Recommended because this project, based in Nakuru, Kenya, brings together student groups from Kenya, the US, Russia, and other countries to share experiences through stories, painting, maskmaking, photodiaries, and other medium. Participants include people with HIV/AIDS, the physically challenged, drug users, soldiers, students, and artists. The artistic expressions of these groups are recorded and circulated as a way of promoting dialogue.

Kodua’s Ark (1994)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this is the story of a man, considered a good-for-nothing, who decides to do something positive with his life.

Citation: Boateng, Yaw Ababio

Media Type: Book

Kodua’s Ark (1994).

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Recommended because this is the story of a man, considered a good-for-nothing, who decides to do something positive with his life. Grade level is upper elementary in subject matter but elementary in reading level.

Citation: Boateng, Yaw Ababio.

Media Type: Book

Kofi Annan (2000)

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Recommended because this a biography of the Ghanaian statesman who was elected Secretary General of the United Nations in 1997.

Citation: Tessitore, John

Media Type: Book

Kofi Annan (2000).

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Recommended because this biography of the UN secretary general covers Kofi Annan’s childhood in Ghana, his college days at Macalester College in St. Paul, his rise at the United Nations, and his current challenges. Written by award-winning author John Tessitore, this volume gives shape to the life of the world’s highest ranking diplomat and most prominent black political leader. Tessitore also addresses the formation of a permanent international war crimes tribunal and the UN’s controversial financial concerns.

Citation: Tessitore, John

Media Type: Book

Kutambura, Struggling People, (1987. 30 min. Video/C 1667).

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Recommended because it tells about the Kubatsirana Project, a trial program to teach literacy and financial independence as well as family planning via community-based teachers in Zimbabwe. The goal is to reduce population growth by encouraging women to take control over their lives.

Media Type: Media

Kwame Nkrumah (1987)

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Recommended because this is a biography of Ghana’s well known president, Kwame Nkrumah. The book is readable and accurate.

Citation: Kellner, Doug

Media Type: Book

Kwame Nkrumah (1987).

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Recommended because it is a biography of Ghana’s well known president, Kwame Nkrumah, the first independent black African state and also a leader in espousing nonalignment and socialism. Interpretations of him range from adoration to scorn. Writing from a Soviet perspective, Smertin sees Nkrumah as fighting global anti-imperialism and states that Nkrumah’s importance lay in his recognition that the laws of class struggle are universal and that developing nations need to adhere to principles of scientific socialism. Acknowledging that Nkrumah did not practice what he theorized, Smertin finds that the leader’s influence on Africa is still enormous. Recommended only for specialized academic collections.The book is readable and accurate.

Citation: Kellner, Doug

Media Type: Book

Lagos: Rich Man, Poor Man (1994. Films for the Humanities and Sciences. Monmouth Junction, NJ.)

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Recommended because it is part of the Geographical Eye over Africa series. This video shows the enormous contrast between the lives of two families in Lagos, Nigeria. The technical quality is excellent, pejorative terms are avoided and one gets a fairly accurate representation of the realities of life for the two families. However, the video lacks historical and regional perspectives on urban life. Also, it would have been useful to learn of the strategies Nigerians have envisioned to address Lagos’ ills.

Media Type: Media

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Land and People of Kenya

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Recommended because Maren’s opening chapter, “A Morning in Kenya,” feels like Africa. It touches first on the morning rhythms of rural peoples in different parts of this diverse country, moves to the bustle of morning Nairobi, and then returns to small city and rural Kenya. The geography of the country is clearly presented and related to the lives of individuals and communities. The author describes different ethnic groups straightforwardly, with an appreciation of the uniqueness of each. Differences are neither romanticized nor presented in hostile or problematic ways, as is too often the case in Kenya books. The section on history, starting appropriately with the emergence of humankind, is clear and well-balanced. Readers should be able to understand why colonial rule emerged and why and how Africans resisted it. The author deals openly with major post-colonial problems, yet respects the efforts of Kenyans to deal with them. Aspects of present-day life — sport, music, education, tourism, the hunger for land — are discussed in terms of how individuals and families experience them. Throughout the book boxed sections treat significant subjects that do not fit into the narrative flow, for example: terminology used to describe Africans; Swahili, age groups; one-party states; and women’s rights. The maps lack detail but are easy to read, and they locate the concepts emphasized in the text. The value of the well-chosen black-and-white illustrations is extended by informative captions. The annotated bibliography and filmography and a discography should be especially useful for teachers. Maren’s experience in the Peace Corps in Kenya probably contributed to his writing a “country” book that goes beyond the formulae to touch humanity there.

Citation: Maren, Michael, (1989) Lippincott.

Media Type: Book

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Land and People of Zimbabwe

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Recommended because this text introduces the reader to geographical and historical information about the country of Zimbabwe.

Citation: Cheney, Patricia (1990). Harper Collins.

Media Type: Book

Leaving Home for Sugar (Commodities Series; 2). (1985. 54 min. Video/C 3495.)

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Recommended because it discusses British involvement in the sugar industry in the West Indies and Zimbabwe, where companies have turned semi-desert land into modern plantations, but at the cost of local farmers who were dispossessed or brought in as forced laborers.

Media Type: Media

Let Your Voice Be Heard: Songs from Ghana and Zimbabwe (1996)

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Recommended because this kit includes a book and an audiocassette. There are nineteen songs from the Akan of Ghana and Shona of Zimbabwe. The book offers a detailed guide for teaching songs.

Citation: Adzenyah, A., Dumisani, M., Cook, J. Published by World Music Press.

Media Type: Book

Library of Congress: Nigeria A Country Study

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site serves as a good general resource for information about Nigeria?s geography, history (includes pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial perspectives) and much more. Strength(s) of site – easy to navigate, well organized, loads quickly. Start by visiting the Nigeria’s Early History section, which provides information about early settlements in Nigeria. Be aware of the fact that this site was last updated in 1991.

Long Night’s Journey Into Day: South Africa’s Search for Truth and Reconciliation

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it is a film about the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC or Commission). The TRC was established in 1995 by the country’s first democratically elected Parliament. According to former Justice Minister Dullah Omar, who introduced the Promotion of National Unity and Reconciliation Act (1995) that created the Commission, the TRC was envisaged as part of the bridge-building process designed to help lead the nation away from a deeply divided past to “a future founded on the recognition of human rights, democracy and peaceful co-existence.”[1] Its overarching mandate was to promote national unity and reconciliation. In order to fulfill it, the TRC set out to uncover “as complete a picture as possible” of the gross human rights violations committed between 1960 and 1994 (from the Sharpeville Massacre to the election of the first democratic government), in the belief that telling the truth about the violations from the various perspectives of those involved would lead to greater understanding and reconciliation between South Africans. Thus the TRC became popularly known as the Truth Commission.

Media Type: Media

Maasai Association

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because the information and perspectives one will find on this web site are unlike most web sites on the Maasai. The information presented represent the perspectives of the Maasai, not the perspectives of outsiders as it relates to the people, land struggle, ceremonies, art, school and water projects, community, lion hunting, and conservation. Also information is available about purchasing the video – The Maasai and Agents of Change — a documentary filmed in southeastern Kenya near Mt. Kilimanjaro in the Merrueshi region.

Maasai Environmental Resource Coalition

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Recommended because this organization was founded to address the illegal appropriation and destruction of the natural environment in Maasai peoples’ traditional lands in Kenya and Tanzania. The site includes information about the history of the Maasai people. The organization is based in Nairobi and Washington, D.C.

Magic Tree: A Folktale from Nigeria (1999)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book shares the perspective of an orphan child in Nigeria. Living with relatives as an orphan is not easy. In many Nigerian societies, orphans are sent to live with family members since there are few institutions for parentless children. The author describes some of the frustrations that Mbi encounters dealing with work and loneliness.

Citation: Morrow, William. New York.

Media Type: Book

Mail & Guardian (Johannesburg)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this online source provides extensive current information on South and Southern Africa. Produces twice daily updates of news, business and sports, with links to background articles from the Mail’s past issues or to primary sources elsewhere on the net. The full text of past issues back to July 1994 plus a database of biographies of over 150 South African political figures are searchable by keyword at http://www.mg.co.za/mag/archive/. Be aware of the listed archival link that is no longer working.

Maneno Magazine for Kids

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Recommended because it is an online resource from Kenya for young students. ica. Strength(s) of site — provides fun, educational activities, and seeks to expose young learners to an African – Kenyan perspective. Maneno Magazine for Kids . Maneno is a superior, children’s magazine targeting African children aged between 6 – 14 years old. It is a full color 40-page smorgasbord of informative and educational stories, comics and interactive activities designed to captivate & entertain its target readers, releasing them from the fear of their own curiosity. The content is strongly African though contemporary recognizing global relevance.(Description of magazine provided by website). Be aware of the fact that this site can be accessed in English and French. It was formerly linked to a Kids Only section of Africa Online.

Master Weaver from Ghana (1988)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this beautiful picture book introduces a contemporary Ghanaian weaver and his art.

Citation: Ahiagble, Gilbert and Louise Meyer

Media Type: Book

Mastering a Continent (Africa series), (1984, 60 min).

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Recommended because Looks at two important developments in early African society, the growth of cattle keeping and agriculture. Focuses on the activities of three communities, the Pokot in Northern Kenya, Sukor in Nigeria and the Dogon of Mali.

Media Type: Media

Mcheshi Goes on a Journey

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Recommended because in this third book in the series, Mcheshi travels with her aunt from rural Kenya to the capital city of Nairobi and continues on to the coastal city of Mombasa. The story shows how traditional and modern forms of transport are used in today’s Kenya.

Citation: Kitsao, J. (1991). Jacaranda Designs.

Media Type: Book

Mcheshi Goes to the Game Park

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Recommended because in this second book in the series, Mcheshi and her younger brother visit a game park in Kenya with their uncle, the game ranger.

Citation: Kitsao, J., (1991) Jacaranda Designs.

Media Type: Book

Mcheshi Goes to the Market

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Recommended because , produced completely in Kenya but available in the U.S., this beautifully illustrated book is published in both Kiswahili and English. The production team includes four Kenyan artists in collaboration with the Department of Linguistics and African Studies at the University of Nairobi. It tells about the visit of a little girl, Mcheshi and her mother to the weekly market and the exchanges and visits that they make together. It is a welcome addition to the lifestyles category for young readers and helps them to see that there may be diverse ways of living and different settings for similar activities. The mother- daughter excursion for quotidienne needs, the enticement of stopping for refreshment, and the allure of purchasing unforeseen goods are all activities that will be familiar to children in the U.S. At the back of the book there are a couple of activity pages which present a matching game for children to play. This type of skill is one that is useful at the early education level and combining African content with a cognitive skill such as this is a much welcome addition. Highly recommended.

Citation: Kitsao, J., (1991). Jacaranda Designs.

Media Type: Book

Miss John (1991).

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Recommended because it tells a story of Joanna who loves adventures but is always getting into trouble. Everyone tells her she behaves like a boy. But why can’t girls run in races or go to the airport on a field trip? Joanna decides to prove she can do anything boys can.

Citation: Boateng, Yaw Ababio.

Media Type: Book

Motherland Nigeria

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site offers a variety of information related to Nigeria. Strength(s) of site – site is created by a Nigerian woman, offers a plethora of links to news, business, travel, health, culture and society as it relates to Nigeria. Start by visiting kid zone , which has suggested reading, message exchange,and other resources for youth. Also check out the links on geography, peoples, languages and history. These links provide basic background information about Nigeria and her peoples. http://www.motherlandnigeria.com/kidzone.html

Moving On, the Hunger for Land in Zimbabwe, (1983. 52 min. Video/C 935).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this film documents the history of the independence movement in Zimbabwe. Shows the continuing disparity between Black farmers, who barely make a living on their inferior land, and affluent whites, who employ modern agricultural techniques on their lush acres.

Media Type: Media

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Multicultural Books to Make and Share (1994)

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Recommended because this is a hands-on book of projects, which contains activities for elementary children around Ghana’s Adinkra cloth

Citation: Gaylord, S. K. Published by Scholastic.

Media Type: Book

Music of the Spirits

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Recommended because a little mbira or “thumb piano” goes a long way in Ron Hallis’s video portrait of Stella Nekati-Chiweshe, of the Shona people of Zimbabwe. Denied knowledge of the spiritual instrument because she was a woman, Stella persisted in her quest, and now plays the instrument with gusto. She says: “I play and go back and imagine how the ancestors lived.” At another point she says: “The spirit comes and talks to you, and does the work.” That’s about as detailed as the workings of the spirit world get, so for the most part we watch Stella play (occasionally stopping to snort some substance) an instrument that is quite lovely to look at, and is melodious to a point, but then begins to sound terribly repetitive. Viewers are not going to learn much about the religious beliefs of the Zimbabwe people from this video, nor are they likely to be enthralled by the long musical performances in the tape. To its credit, Music of the Spirits has won both a Special Jury Prize from the Vues d’Afrique Festival in 1990 and a Global Africa Award from the Global Africa Festival in 1991. University libraries will certainly want to consider this for its scholastic value in African studies, but for public libraries this is not a necessary purchase.

Media Type: Media