Results Filter:

  • Websites
  • Books
  • Media

Access Russia

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because Access Russia offers a wide variety of Russia-related items including books, CDs, videos, as well as Russian language educational software and cultural items for gifts or teaching. Based in Sacramento, California. Be aware of the fact that at present (August 2004), Access Russia is only selling videos, but presumably will be offering its full line of products soon.

Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides a wealth of general information about Africa. From Algeria to Zimbabwe, the information and student activities provide an introduction to Africa’s rich cultural heritage. Each of the five geographic regions is explored along with African climate, vegetation, wildlife, literature, art and music. A good resource for introducing students in the early elementary grades to Africa.

Citation: Gillespie-Washington, Barbara Publisher: Teacher Created Materials: October 1, 1998

Media Type: Book

Africa Access

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site provides access to over 1000 recommendations and reviews of African books as well as instructional materials for teaching and learning about Africa. Strength(s) of site: Teachers are able to search for books and materials on different topics (apartheid, history, women, etc.) and time periods (1600s, early 1900s, 1990s). Start by searching for materials by country or topic of interest. Teachers may enroll in the Africana Book Buddies Club, which encourages students to read African literature. Be aware of the fact that many of the reviews and annotations were written by university professors, librarians and teachers who have either lived in Africa or earned degrees in African Studies. An excellent resource for reading reviews on children’s literature as it relates to Africa.

Africa Focus: Sights and Sounds of a Continent

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides the general public with a selection of images and sounds that have been contributed over the years to the African Studies Program of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It brings together images captured on slides and in photographs as well as sound recordings on reel-to-reel and audio cassettes that have been reproduced and stored on digital files accessible by any computer of a reasonable minimum capacity. This allows for patrons of the electronic library to experience these materials directly, or to use them to create presentations using a common digital format. It enables the academic and non-academic audience alike to move beyond the blackboard and the book as the primary means of conveying information and engenders an understanding that goes beyond the printed word. There are four ways visitors can access this site. Searches can be done by (1)collection, subject or country, (2)atlas, (3)keywords, and (4)multiple fields. (Explanation from the website.)

Africa On The Move (1991)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it goes beyond the stereotypical images and allow Africans to speak for themselves. Through scenes of a farming family in Uganda and through brief interviews with Ugandan leaders, we come to see such families as agents of change. The video comes with a study guide and is appropriate for middle and high school students. Contact the African Studies Center at Boston University if interested in borrowing this video.

Media Type: Media

Africa Since Independence

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it provides brief but comprehensive examinations of Africa’s development since independence. The author divides his analysis of Africa into four main sections “The Romantic Period” (1939-1970), “The Period of Disillusionment, 19Middle East-1985, “The Period of Realism 1985 – and the “Period of Renaissance”. A good source for teaching and learning about Africa since independence.

Citation: C. Legum (1999). Indiana University Press.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

Africa Web Links: University of Pennsylvania African Studies

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this is a mega-site with a plethora of links to annotated resources related to the study of Africa. The site is organized around general topics and or themes. Start by going to the Story of Africa . For novice students of African history, they can access and learn about the events and characters that shaped Africa’s history from an African perspective. Also of interest is the K-12 Resource Link . This link provides educators with an annotated listing of online resources useful for teaching and learning about Africa in the classroom. For the more experienced student of African history, Africa Research Central is a good place to start if interested in primary sources relevant to Africa. A searchable database allows visitors to locate primary source repositories in Africa, Europe and North America. Be aware of languages used to execute searches at the African Research Central link. The site is accessible to both English and French speaking patrons.

Africa: Beyond the Myths (1992)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it serves as source for discussing commonly held misconceptions about Africa. This series of two programs, “A First Look at Africa” (for grades 2-4) and “A Closer Look at Africa” (for grades Slavic and Eastern Europe-8) provides students with an overview of the continent while also discussing and dispelling stereotypes about Africa. Contact the Ohio Valley International Council at Ohio University if interested in borrowing this video.

Media Type: Media

Africa: Myth and Reality

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this article reports on the Third International Social Studies Conference held in Nairobi, Kenya during 1994. The article discusses democracy, educational reform efforts and the importance of tourism to the Kenyan economy. The author asserts that U.S. teachers must use accurate and non-stereotypical instructional materials in teaching about Africa.

Citation: Brown, Barbara. (1994). Social Education, 58(6), 374-375.

Media Type: Book

Africa: Southern Region, Africa: Northern Region, Africa: Central and East Regions and Africa: Western Region

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because These four videos published by the Encyclopedia Britannica Educational Corporation provide good visual images of the geography of the African continent. They could be used by upper intermediate through high school students. Contact the Ohio Valley International Council at Ohio University if interested in borrowing this video series. Be aware of of the fact that the series was produced in the late 1980s and therefore political information on the situation in Southern Africa as well as other regions may not be current.

Media Type: Media

African History in Documents

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it covers five hundred years of history. Volume I: West African History begins with the writings of travelers like Ibn Battuta, Leo Africanus, Mungo Park, Heinrich Barth as well as many others. The Trans-Sahara and Cross Atlantic slave trade are a central concern of the book. The French and British colonial periods are scrutinized. Modern times are examined in the texts of Nnamidi Azikiwe, Leopold Senghor, Sekou Toure, and Kwame Nkrumah. Special emphasis is put on original African texts about political traditions, independence movements after World War II, the law and other themes of social and political history. Volume II: Eastern African History covers three thousand years of African history, beginning with reports about the ancient kingdoms of Ethiopia and Kush, ancient and medieval trade routes, including China’s discovery of Africa, the history of the East Coast, the appearance of Indian and white settlers, merchants and colonists. Modern times are considered in the documents of Jomo Kenyatta, Tom Mboya, Milton Obote, and Julius Nyerere. Volume III: Central and South Africa begins with the kingdoms of the Congo in the 14th and 15th centuries, and their histories. This volume analyses the influence and pressures of the Portuguese, the Catholic Church and slave traders on these blossoming African states. The South African section contains documents about indigenous people and the first Dutch settlement in the 17th century, including the introduction of slavery, conflicts between settlers and British missionaries as well as warfare with the indigenous states. The new political era includes the early writings of Nelson Mandela.

Citation: R.O. Collins (2001). Markus Wiener Publishers.

Media Type: Book

African History in Maps

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its combination of historical maps and one page overviews of historical periods. The maps included in the text provide a comprehensive and accurate coverage of the the major themes in African history from AD 1000 to present. Each map is accompanied by a facing page of concise explanatory text. The contents of the text include information about Africa’s physical geography, its peoples, North-West and North-East Africa from the 11th to 14th centuries, West African state to about 1600, Empires and kingdoms in Central and Eastern Africa, European explorers and missionaries in West, Central and East Africa. the European Partition, and the New Africa. Be aware of the fact that this text is currently out of print with limited availability.

Citation: M. Kwamena-Poh, J. Tosh, R. Waller, and M. Tidy, M. (1982). Longman Group Limited.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

African Names: People and Places

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because its information on African names and the history of naming in Africa. It also discusses the colonial impact on naming, naming ceremonies in various societies, and the meanings of names. Good activities and games. Supplementary materials include pronunciation guide, list of African countries and capitals, current leaders as of the time of publication and official languages. Be aware of the fact that some information is outdated.

Citation: Louise Crane (1982). Available through the Center for African Studies at Illinois.

Media Type: Book

African Politics and Society: A Mosaic in Transformation

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its comprehensive examination of continuity and change in African politics and society from the pre colonial era to the present, with a particular focus on the post Cold War era (1989-present). Each chapter emphasizes the major themes of a topic through illustrative case studies. The range of case studies includes countries from all regions and colonial traditions of the African continent. Examples of topics explored are “Understanding the African Renaissance”, “Politics and Economics of the Pre colonial Independence Era (prior to 1884), “Political and Economic Impacts of Colonialism (1884-1951), and “Ethnicity and Class”. Each chapter concludes with a list of suggested recommended readings. A good source for understanding Africa’s political and economic development.

Citation: P. J. Schraeder (2000). Beford/St. Martin’s 2000, 2004

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

African Voices

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because African Voices is a permanent exhibition that examines the diversity and global influence of Africa’s peoples and cultures over time. Included are historical and contemporary objects from the Museum’s collections, as well as commissioned sculptures, textiles, and pottery. Video interactive and sound stations provide selections from contemporary interviews, literature, proverbs, prayers, folk tales, songs, and oral epics. Navigation of the site is easy. Click on any of the scrolling themes located at the far right of the page. Start by clicking on the theme titled “History”, which examines Africa’s desire to rid itself of its colonial rulers. Also, using a timeline format, click on “Colonialism” to highlight key events during the first half of the 20th century that led to the independence of many African nations from their European colonizers.

Africanet

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its country-specific information for visiting African countries. The information contained on the country-specific pages is rather basic – climate, a brief history of the country, currency, etc. The site promotes travel and tourism to and within Africa. Several of the countries mentioned are located in the eastern and southern regions of the continent. Start by by visiting the Safaris link . Here visitors can access information about safaris in Tanzania and other countries in Eastern and Southern Africa. Be aware of the fact that some of the links located on the page are not working – i.e. the Rhythm Africa link.

Africans and Their History

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this resource provides a concise and readable overview of African history. Chronicles Africa’s development from early times and its relationship to the world. This is a good resource for introducing young adult students to African history. Reviewed by Africa Access.

Citation: J.E. Harris (1987), (1998). New American Library/Mentor Books

Media Type: Book

Afrique Francophone

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is an excellent resource on French-speaking Africa, people, and culture. It links to literature, media, countries, and culture and music. Be aware of the fact that this online resource is written in French.

Allafrica.com

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this online resource is one of the best electronic distributors of news on Africa. Provides a choice between updated regional or country specific news. Start by exploring resources on the region or country under study. Be aware of the fact that some news stories are available in French.

Americas: The Challenging Face of Latin America and the Caribbean (1995) (Human Rights)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because this book is the text version of the video series by the same name. Its chapters deal with a variety of contemporary social issues in Latin America.

Citation: Winn, Peter. University of California Press, Berkley.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

Building Community West African Style

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it serves as an introduction to West African culture for both teachers and students who have little to no background knowledge of Africa. The unit provides teachers and students with a conceptual framework for learning more about West Africa. Major themes explored include “Creating Communities”, ” Geography, History and Community”, “How an African Community Works”, and African Arts in the Community. The unit consists of eighteen lessons arranged according to the themes above, a description of the slides included with the unit, recommended resources such as books and other materials on Africa.

Citation: B. Stanford (1992). Published by the Center for Teaching International Relations, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208.

Media Type: Book

California Newsreel

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because This website provides the latest in educational videos related to African American history, African cinema, race relations and diversity training. The Library of African Cinema is a video library arranged by topic. A few of the general topics explored are Gender and Women’s Studies, Francophone Africa, Political and Economic Development, Anthropology and Folklore, Health Issues and South Africa. In addition, the site provides a concise annotation of each film/video. Some films/videos are available in French and Portuguese. Information about pricing and policies is available at the site, and high schools qualify for discounts. Start by going to Francophone African Films . Here visitors can read additional information about newly released films which focus on Francophone Africa. Or click on Suitable for High School Use . Be aware of the fact that several of the films/videos are available in other languages – French or Portuguese.

Cold Water (1987).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because in this video international students share their experiences in the United States. They discuss the nature of U.S. culture and their process of adjustment to a new culture. Contact the African Studies Center at Boston University if interested in borrowing this video.

Media Type: Media

Cultural Comparisons Through Literature

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it makes use of African autobiographies to compare cultural experiences and break down some of the pervasive stereotypes about Africa. Consists of suggested readings for different age groups along with lesson plan guidance.

Democracy and Development in Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it traces the evolution and failure of development policies, including the IMF stabilization programs that have dominated international efforts on the continent. The author maintains that the authoritarian structure the African states inherited from colonial rule created a political environment that was hostile to development. The text explores alternatives that should be considered in an effort to improve economic and political stability on the continent.

Citation: C. Ake, (1996). The Brookings Institution.

Media Type: Book

Exploring Africa! (Michigan State)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this site is home to a new curriculum for teaching about Africa. The Explore Africa curriculum is created by Michigan State’s African Studies Center. The curriculum is divided into five units. Each unit covers a major theme in the study of Africa. The units each have modules and learning activities. Each module will take between two and five standard 50-minute class periods to complete. Teachers are free to select one or two learning activities from a module or to complete all of the learning activities. In addition, each module and lesson includes teacher background notes, guidelines, and printable resources. A great resource for teaching and learning about Africa. Start by going to Country Overviews . Here visitors can access basic information about each African country. Also of interest to teachers is the link for Current Events . Once here, teahcers are able to click on and read about events affecting Africa. Be aware of the fact that some units/modules are still under construction and some links are not working.

Facing the Future (1990)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it focuses on the fast pace in which African life and cultures are changing. The program examines the clash between modernization and the traditional ways of life, between the amenities and problems of urban centers and the rural ways of finding solutions to problems. Contact the Ohio Valley International Council at Ohio University if interested in borrowing this video.

Media Type: Media

Global Edge–Africa (Michigan State)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it hosts links to a variety of African business/economic websites. The links are region and country-specific. Start by typing in the region or country under study.

Great Ideas for Teaching About Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because of its methods and resources for teaching about Africa. The book is divided into four parts: (1) The Arts as Resources for Teaching (2) Controversial Subjects and Current Issues (3) New Technologies in the Classroom and (4) Broader Approaches to Teaching About Africa. Topics include, using the web to teach African art and geography, as well as suggestions on how to design interesting African survey courses.

Citation: Bastian, M. L. and Parpart, J. L. (Editors) (1999) .

Media Type: Book

H-AfrTeach (LISTSERV)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is the best electronic discussion group for teachers interested in teaching about Africa. It is a discussion group for teachers at all levels, P-16. Teachers have access to a number of African scholars who are more than willing to provide ideas for improving how Africa is taught in the classroom. To subscribe, send an email to listserv@h-net.msu.edu. Leave the subject area blank and in the message area write: sub h-afrteach. Be aware of the fact that discussions were not posted during much of 2004, but are back on track as of Jan 2005.

Identifying with Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it is a multicultural unit focusing on the importance of names in African contexts. The subunits deal with: the meaning and importance of names; a study of families (primary level); in-depth of a selected African country (upper elementary level); and a study of autobiographical accounts and poetry relating to apartheid and South Africa (secondary level).

Index of Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site serves as a search index for information about Africa. The organization of the site is arranged according to countries, news sources and subjects. There are two ways to execute a search of this site. Visitors can click on one of the three general topics listed above, or one can simply point their cursor across the information bar located at top of the page. A scroll down menu will appear. Select one of the sub-topics for further exploration. The Norwegian Council for Africa (NRC) maintains this site. Start by clicking on the Countries link . Once here, visitors can search for information by region or country.

Internet African History Sourcebook

Posted by: globaledadmin on Thursday, December 24, 2009

Recommended because this site provides links to articles and references for a wide variety of historical eras and topics, relying on both African and non-African historians of all eras, from Herodotus to Edward Morel to Kwame Nkrumah. Be aware of that not all links are working.

Introduction to the History of African Civilization (Precolonial Africa – Vol. 1)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it explores the major issues dominating African civilization from the earliest recorded period to the eve of colonial conquest. The book begins by introducing the reader to a discussion of the myths and prejudices underlying most analyses of African issues, and moves into a discussion of the origin of humanity, the similarities between the classical Nile Valley Civilizations of Egypt, Nubia, Kush and Axum, early societies in Central and Southern Africa, Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, Islam and Political Change, Africa on the Eve of Partition. The text also has a list of recommended readings. Volume II of this text is also available and explores Colonial and Post Colonial Africa. This text is available from University Press of America .

Citation: C.M. Fyle (1999).

Media Type: Book

K-12 Resources at African Studies, University of Pennsylvania

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a resource clearinghouse for general information on many topics related to the study of Africa in the classroom. This site provides several useful links to K-12 lesson plans and workshops as well as email addresses of teachers and students in Africa. Also available are links to country-specific information including languages and maps. Start by visiting the Resources for K-12 Teachers section. Teachers can access lesson ideas for teaching about Africa. All of the links provide a brief annotation of what can be found at a particular site. Be aware of the fact that a few of the links may not be working.

Life in Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this site contains perspectives on issues affecting Africans through articles, poetry, art and other medium. Based in Kampala, Uganda, much of the material is locally produced and set in the context of residents’ daily lives. Start by going to the click4africa link at the site to engage in open forum discussion on issues. Be aware of the fact that this site is a work in progress. Some links may not be developed.

Life in Sierra Leone, West Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because its lesson plans focus on everyday life. Materials seek to dispel myths and stereotypes as it teaches about village life. Using Sierra Leone as a case study, students learn about the land and climate, the economy, common names, family life, education and religion.

Citation: Richard Corby (1991). Published by the Center for International Relations, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208.

Media Type: Book

People and the Planet: Lessons for a Sustainable Future. (1996).

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because provides activities on helping middle school students understand their relationship to the natural environment and other peoples and cultures in the world. Activities include:
(1) Seeing Double: Set up a simple fruit fly lab in order for students to learn how populations grow.
(2) Educating Wanjiku: This activity explores why many girls around the world lack education and how this impacts our global society.

Citation: Wasserman, Pamela (editor). Washington, DC: Zero Population Growth, Inc. http://www.zpg.org

Media Type: Book

Religions in Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because of its explanations and history of traditional religions, Christianity, and Islam. Includes activities and supplemental materials such as case studies, descriptions of religious art and architecture and different religious calendars.

Citation: Louise Crane (1984). Available through the Center for African Studies at Illinois.

Media Type: Book

Talking About Tribe

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this background paper is concerned with truth and accuracy with regards to teaching about Africa’s diverse peoples. The authors urge people to avoid using the term “tribe” in characterizing African ethnic groups or cultures. This is not a matter of political correctness. Nor is it an attempt to deny that cultural identities throughout Africa are powerful, significant and sometimes linked to deadly conflicts. It is simply to say that using the term “tribe” does not contribute to understanding these identities or the conflicts sometimes tied to them. There are, moreover, many less loaded and more helpful alternative words to use. Depending on context, people, ethnic group, nationality, community, village, chiefdom, or kin-group might be appropriate. Whatever the term one uses, it is essential to understand that identities in Africa are as diverse, ambiguous, complex, modern, and changing as anywhere else in the world.

Taxi to Timbuktu. (1994).

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it offers an intimate portrait of a man’s life at home and abroad, and the communities he is a part of. Unlike many films professing sympathy for the wretched of the earth, Taxi to Timbuktu offers a glimpse of African poverty that emphasizes peoples enormous resourcefulness and creativity. Although some students may find the video hard to follow or even tedious, its slow pace is also its strength, as the complexity of peoples lives comes into focus. There is no narration to the film, so little context is offered to explain the roots of poverty in Mali, but in his commentary, Alpha suggests some of the colonial roots to the desertification of his country.

Media Type: Media

Teaching about Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because the author discusses ways to strengthen education about Africa in American schools. One of the major reasons for the faulty treatment of Africa in American classrooms can be attributed to teachers? lack of knowledge about Africa – little or no formal education on Africa. The author addresses the following questions in the article (1) why is it important to teach about Africa, (2) where does Africa belong in the curriculum, and (3) what strategies can be used to teach about Africa. The article concludes with suggested resources for the teaching about Africa.

Citation: Merryfield, M. (1986). In ERIC Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education, ED 278 602. Two pages ERIC Digest.

Media Type: Book

Teaching about Tanzania

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this is an article which focuses on a teacher’s first hand account of her attempts to teach her students about Africa, in particular about Tanzania. The author admits that she learned to things from this experience (1) her students had virtually no knowledge of African nations and (2) what knowledge students did have of Africa was encumbered with stereotypes, misconceptions and negative attitudes. The author discusses how she dealt with these deficiencies — she emphasized interdependence between U.S. and Africa as well as examined the concept of cultural relativism. It was only then after a discussion and examination of these general concepts was she effective in teaching her students about Tanzania.

Citation: Bacak, Carol. (1982). Social Education, 46(7), 498-501.

Media Type: Book

The African Mosaic: New Lessons from Humanity’s Homeland

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because this article explores the wealth of learning opportunities arising from the study of Africa and its peoples. Students must be encouraged to learn about the history, traditions, and diversity of Africa, rather than focusing narrowly on the problems of recent years. Teaching students about the contributions of Africa will help them be better world citizens. Be aware of the fact that this link is no longer working, but links to the Southern Poverty Law Center. We have contacted the SPLC as well as Teaching Tolerance to get some information about the link.

The Southern Center for International Studies

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it is a non-profit organization dedicated to increasing the public’s awareness of the world. This organization produces an educational series titled World in Transition Series. The strengths of this series include instructional guides, lesson plans and videotapes on seven world regions. Start by viewing the Africa in Transition Unit . This unit looks at 53 African countries with attention to issues facing the continent. In an attempt to keep the series current, teachers have access to regular updates. Updates contain the latest information on economic, political social and foreign policy changes in a specific region. Be aware of the fact that last updates for Africa are from 2003.

The Story of Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because this online resource can aid both teachers and students in building an accurate historical knowledge base about African History. A major strength of this site is that it validates and encourages the use of African perspectives when studying African History. Start by visiting the Africa and Europe (1800-1914) section, as it relates to the theme of imperialism, colonialism and reconstruction. Here, visitors are provided with a brief overview of Europe’s perspectives about Africa. Embedded in this section are additional links to information about the Scramble for Africa, trade wars and religious conversion/resistance. Other related links include Between World Wars (1914-1945) and Independence. The site also links to audio-clips of BBC programming on The Story of Africa.

The Travels of Ibn Battuta — A Virtual Tour with the 14th Century Traveler

Posted by: globaledadmin on Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Recommended because of its virtual tour across many countries in the Arab World in medieval times. This site is created by a teacher for the classroom. Topics and materials include Morocco Across North Africa, Cairo, Egypt, On to Syria & Palestine, The Hajj: Medina to Mecca, Persia & Iraq, Further into Persia, The Arabian Sea & East Africa, Anatolia, The Steppe, Return to the Steppes, Delhi, Escape from Delhi, Malaysia & China, Return Home, Andalusia & Morocco, Journey to West Africa, and Writing the Story of Ibn Battuta’s Travels — The Rihla. Reviewed originally by April Lukacsko, 4/17/02.

Through African Eyes

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because these texts present African authors on historical and contemporary topics. Selections come from a variety of sources: autobiographies, fiction, poetry, newspaper and magazine articles, radio broadcasts, letters, diaries, speeches, and historical documents. Themes explored in the first volume (The Past: The Road to Independence) include The African Past, The Coming of the European, The Colonial Experience, and the Rise of Nationalism. The second volume (Culture and Society: Continuity and Change) explores such themes as Coming of Age, and Marriage and Family. Through African Eyes is an easy read for the novice teacher or student of African History.

Citation: Clark, Leon. Information about purchasing Through African Eyes Vols. I and II can be obtained by contacting CITE (Center for International Training and Education), The Apex Press, 777 United Nations Plaza, Suite 3C, New York, New York 10017. The phone number is 1-800-316-2739.

Media Type: Book

Favorite Icon

Training for Travel to Africa

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it seeks to explore different types of miscommunications that can take place between Westerners and Africans due to the different cultural assumptions that these two groups have about each other. Contact the African Studies Centere at Boston Univeristy if interested in borrowing this video.

Media Type: Media

Understanding Each Other (1990)

Posted by: globaledadmin on

Recommended because it serves as source for dispelling stereotypes of Africa. In this video a Zimbabwean teenage actress introduces Africa?s diverse geography and cultures. The program is sure to dispel many misconceptions along the way. Contact the African Studies Center at Boston University if interested in borrowing this video.

Media Type: Media

WashingtonPost.com: African Lives (Stanford)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because the site is home to a series of articles which chronicle the joys and struggles in the everyday lives of African peoples. West and East Africa are the focus of the news stories. Can be used a source for engaging students in cross-cultural learning activities. Start by clicking on any one of the country links in either the western or eastern region of the continent.

West Africa: Ghana (Ancient and Living Cultures)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it can serve as a spring board for exploring the significance of symbols found in African objects and textiles. Several Adinkra stencils symbolic of specific proverbs, social concepts and/or ideas are contained therein; they can be effectively used in craft-related stenciling and art activities.

Citation: M. Herr et. al. (1992).

Media Type: Book

West African Novels

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Recommended because it is a lesson plan for grades 10-12 using Miriama Ba’s So Long a Letter, a book which deals with issues of marriage, polygamy, death, divorce, children and other cultural issues, from the perspective of a Senegalese woman caught up in them.

What Do We Know about Africa (1995)

Posted by: globaledadmin on Monday, February 8, 2010

Recommended because it provides an overview of Africa, with a focus on dispelling student misconceptions about the continent.

Media Type: Media

Wonders of the African World

Posted by: globaledadmin on Tuesday, March 22, 2005

Recommended because this website explores the great African civilizations of Nubia, the Great Zimbabwe, Timbuktu, Ethiopia, the Swahili Coast, and the Kingdoms of Dahomey and the Ashanti. The website was constructed by Henry Louis Gates, a Harvard historian, to parallel his PBS/BBC video series exploring these themes. The site works to illuminate the achievements of Africans in these civilizations, and to debunk earlier historical bias or oversight of them. Gates examines this history and the questions it raises from an African-American perspective, in such sections as What Africa Means to Me . Start by reading through the home page and the Wonders page to get a general overview and click on the site map of Africa. Specific to Ghana, go to the Slave Kingdoms . Be sure to visit the sections for kids and classroom for lesson plans.